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IMPORTANT (Please read to avoid confusion):
Some items below may be tagged with a bold, red, all-caps "out of print/unavailable" notice. This does NOT mean that all other items not so tagged are, in fact, in stock -- or for that matter, in print and available, though there's a good chance they are. Some folks get confused on this point, and we can see why, so please read this for further clarification and other important before-you-order information. Unlike some mailorder websites, we don't have an electronic inventory system linked to our site, so you can't be sure of what we actually have or don't have in stock at any given moment without asking us -- please email our mailorder department for availability status -- or better yet, just go ahead and place your order using our shopping cart function and we'll get back to you with the status of each item. If you have general non-mailorder questions, email the store.


H.P. LOVECRAFT Dreams In The Witch House: The Complete Philips Recordings (Rev-Ola) cd 17.98

album cover H>OST Cin (V/VM Test Records) cd 14.98
First V/VM Test release that isn't a completely moronic conceptual art piece of shit. H>OST is the work of Polish artist Jacek Toszek. Cold and beautiful sonic landscapes much like those found in his native land, Toszek captures and embraces the frigidity inherent in electro-acoustic music and exploits it in the context of lifeless electronica.

HAACK, BRUCE Electric Lucifer Book 2 (Normal / Q.D.K.) cd 14.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
This is the previously unreleased 1979 sequel to Bruce Haack's 1970 "Electric Lucifer" LP, perhaps the most awesomely bizarre psychedelic pre-Kraftwerk electronica album ever to be released on a major label (Columbia) or elsewhere. The robotic voices and mechanical rhythms that made the first "Electric Lucifer" such a cult kitsch classic are still present on Book II, although it's perhaps more poppy and goofy and less disturbingly weird than its predecessor. Aside from that one (not-too-successful) major label release, Haack's career from the '60s through the early '80s focused on self-released electronic children's records, which while perhaps amusing (and of interest for his innovative home-built synths), of course don't come close to the trippy electro-rock and serious religious themes of the Electric Lucifer concept. With only portions of the original available on cd via the Bruce Haack "Hush Little Robot" collection, we can only hope that someday it will see a full cd reissue!! In the meantime, Book II is a treat for Haack fans.
RealAudio clip: "Mean Old Devil"
RealAudio clip: "Stand Up Lazaras"

album cover HAACK, BRUCE Electric Lucifer Book II (In Which Lucifer Tempts Jesus Of Nazareth) (Telephone Explosion) lp 21.00
Wow, now someone's done a first-time-on-vinyl version of this interesting Bruce Haack artifact. It came out on cd about 13 years ago, that's now out of print, and this is what we said then:
This is the previously unreleased 1979 sequel to Bruce Haack's 1970 Electric Lucifer LP, perhaps the most awesomely bizarre psychedelic pre-Kraftwerk electronica album ever to be released on a major label (Columbia) or elsewhere. The robotic voices and mechanical rhythms that made the first Electric Lucifer such a cult kitsch classic are still present on Book II, although it's perhaps more poppy and goofy and less disturbingly weird than its predecessor. Aside from that one (not-too-successful) major label release, Haack's career from the '60s through the early '80s focused on self-released electronic children's records, which while certainly amusing (and of interest for his innovative home-built synths), of course don't come close to the trippy electro-rock and serious religious themes of the Electric Lucifer concept. Book II is a definite treat for Haack fans, nice to have it on vinyl, and lookin' good.
MPEG Stream: "Mean Old Devil"
MPEG Stream: "Stand Up Lazaras"

album cover HAACK, BRUCE Farad (Stones Throw) cd 16.98
If you're like us, you can never get enough Bruce Haack. Pretty much everything he touched was amazing, as well as way ahead of its time from a technical standpoint. Haack's genius, however, is that at the core of his strange electronic music is real emotional depth.
The most obvious comparison for Bruce Haack's sound would be Kraftwerk, and surely both parties were taking electronic music into unprecedented new territories. It's a bit of a lazy comparison though, as Haack's pioneering work actually predated Kraftwerk as most people know them, and it overlooks how unique Haack's approach to songwriting was. Haack is most famous for the Electric Lucifer album, definitely his strongest and most conceptually realized statement, but he also made children's music, as well as some more, shall we say "adult-themed" compositions. There was even an Electric Lucifer Book 2 and a number of perfect pop singles. Farad (the name of the homemade vocoder he used extensively, named in honor of famed British scientist Michael Farraday but also sounding a bit like "far out") collects prime cuts from 1970 to 1982, showing an artist who remained true to his initial vision while continuing to break boundaries. Haack was a man who wanted to share his songs with the world, as evidenced by a quote in this album, and accordingly, his music is very fun to listen to. Songs like "Rita" are really beyond any sort of reference point, just weird and beautiful and insanely poppy gems that even today sound beyond anything else. Other numbers like "Man Kind" from the Haackula album are spacey sci-fi romps filled with all kinds of great analog atmosphere and evocative vocoded lyrics that flow like bizarre little nursery rhymes. Then you get some racier stuff from the 80s like "Snow Job" and "Program Me", the latter of which resurrects a song from the Electric Lucifer and re-envisions it in a colder, more robotic way for some great results. Haack even proves with 1982's "Party Machine" that he was fully ready to embrace the progression of electronic dance music while still sounding unlike anyone else. It's crazy to listen to the more playful material alongside the epic storytelling of the Electric Lucifer tracks, as you realize Haack grasped so many types of music with a wide range of emotions, and merged this with bold electronic innovation. As a compilation, Stones Throw have done a great job here, making this the obvious place to start for anyone unfamiliar with Haack's work while also being a great collection of some of his strongest songs. Awesome.
MPEG Stream: "Rita"
MPEG Stream: "Noon Day Sun"
MPEG Stream: "Program Me"

album cover HAACK, BRUCE Farad (Stones Throw) 2lp 21.00
If you're like us, you can never get enough Bruce Haack. Pretty much everything he touched was amazing, as well as way ahead of its time from a technical standpoint. Haack's genius, however, is that at the core of his strange electronic music is real emotional depth.
The most obvious comparison for Bruce Haack's sound would be Kraftwerk, and surely both parties were taking electronic music into unprecedented new territories. It's a bit of a lazy comparison though, as Haack's pioneering work actually predated Kraftwerk as most people know them, and it overlooks how unique Haack's approach to songwriting was. Haack is most famous for the Electric Lucifer album, definitely his strongest and most conceptually realized statement, but he also made children's music, as well as some more, shall we say "adult-themed" compositions. There was even an Electric Lucifer Book 2 and a number of perfect pop singles. Farad (the name of the homemade vocoder he used extensively, named in honor of famed British scientist Michael Farraday but also sounding a bit like "far out") collects prime cuts from 1970 to 1982, showing an artist who remained true to his initial vision while continuing to break boundaries. Haack was a man who wanted to share his songs with the world, as evidenced by a quote in this album, and accordingly, his music is very fun to listen to. Songs like "Rita" are really beyond any sort of reference point, just weird and beautiful and insanely poppy gems that even today sound beyond anything else. Other numbers like "Man Kind" from the Haackula album are spacey sci-fi romps filled with all kinds of great analog atmosphere and evocative vocoded lyrics that flow like bizarre little nursery rhymes. Then you get some racier stuff from the 80s like "Snow Job" and "Program Me", the latter of which resurrects a song from the Electric Lucifer and re-envisions it in a colder, more robotic way for some great results. Haack even proves with 1982's "Party Machine" that he was fully ready to embrace the progression of electronic dance music while still sounding unlike anyone else. It's crazy to listen to the more playful material alongside the epic storytelling of the Electric Lucifer tracks, as you realize Haack grasped so many types of music with a wide range of emotions, and merged this with bold electronic innovation. As a compilation, Stones Throw have done a great job here, making this the obvious place to start for anyone unfamiliar with Haack's work while also being a great collection of some of his strongest songs. Awesome.
MPEG Stream: "Rita"
MPEG Stream: "Noon Day Sun"
MPEG Stream: "Program Me"

album cover HAACK, BRUCE Haackula (The Omni Recording Corporation) cd 17.98
Wow. This is a real "believe it or not" release. We thought we knew all about eccentric electropop pioneer Bruce Haack (1931-1988). Omni's reissue of Haack's 1969 psychedelic synth classic The Electric Lucifer was an automatic Record Of The Week for us. But we'd never heard of Haackula before. However, it lives up to its billing as a "lost classic of outsider electronica" for sure. At first, we weren't sure what to expect, putting it on with some excitement and trepidation... rest assured, we now have big smiles on our faces. Haackula is playful and perverse, and perhaps more than a little bit paranoid. Imagine Perrey and Kingsley on some bad acid. Haack's electronically effected vocals here continue the wordplay that he delighted in on The Electric Lucifer but now, shockingly, some swear words have crept in, for instance he drops the f-bomb in the first song "Lie Back", wherein he also rhymes "schizoid" with "shitzoid"!
Bruce Haack unleashed his Moogs (and warped imagination) in his bedroom studio to create Haackula back in 1978, but it remained officially unreleased until now. Possibly 'cause a large portion of Haack's discography consists of records for children, we were really surprised by the R-rated content of Haackula. And the R isn't just for robotic. There's a song called "Blow Job" fer chrissakes. Perhaps this is why it never saw the light of day in Haack's lifetime...
Haack's homebuilt synths and rhythm machines bleep and bloop, shuffle and shudder, conjuring an alternate universe of electronic computer funk wackier and weirder and way more off-kilter than anything Kraftwerk was up to at the time. The musical sense of childlike innocence with which Haack was so adept is still happening here, these tracks are as tuneful and catchy as ever, but his mystical ideas are joined by sexual themes... where The Electric Lucifer was astrological, Haackula is scatological. Adult realities are confronting the outsider, making Haackula's haunted house electronics all the more eerie, while the bizzaro-factor (plus Haack's aforementioned songwriting skills) insure that it's all very entertaining, gleefully so.
And if Haackula itself wasn't cool enuff, there two equally mindblowing bonus tracks. First there's Bruce Haack's 1982 proto-hiphop collaboration with Def Jam's Russell Simmons, an 8 minute track entitled "Party Machine" that features funky Herbie Hancock "rockit" style grooves and deep distorted vocals laying down such science as "Haack attack is back... Bruce Haack... Anti-wack." Damn!
The other bonus track included is an epic 32:15 piece called "Icarus" that would have made a fine release all by itself. Commissioned in 1979 to accompany an avant-garde art exhibition in Guadalajara, it's a sensational soundscape of everything from mad scientist laboratory burbling to faux-classical fantasias, frightening noise and groovy beats...
Omni has done their usual nice job with this. It's remastered from the original master tapes, and includes a thick booklet. Extensive, informative liner notes tell the story of Haack's "lost years", about his psychological ups and downs, how his passion for music and technology (and the two together!) never flagged despite his lack of major label success after The Electric Lucifer failed to take the world by storm... we also learn how he hooked up with hiphop producer Simmons, though we're left wondering if any DJs back in the day ever got their hands on it. As well, the cd booklet includes vintage photos and lyrics to all the Haackula songs.
Like we said, believe it or not, it's true. Haackula lives!!
MPEG Stream: "Man Kind"
MPEG Stream: "Blow Job"
MPEG Stream: "Party Machine"

HAACK, BRUCE Hush Little Robot (Q.D.K.) cd 16.98
Working with Raymond Scott, Bruce Haack developed his own very bizarre, though very distinct brand of electronic composition using self-built machines. These recordings, from between 1969 and 1970, are simple songs ostensibly for children (includes a strange version of "This Old Man") in the tradition of Raymond Scott. But this is no bliss for babies--this is analogue, vocoder, acid weirdness. Several of the tracks are pulled from his legendary album The Electric Lucifer, an electronic opera of the battle between Heaven and Hell. So don't buy this for your children, buy it for your next trip.

HAACK, BRUCE Hush Little Robot (Q.D.K.) lp 16.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
Working with Raymond Scott, Bruce Haack developed his own very bizarre, though very distinct brand of electronic composition using self-built machines. These recordings, from between 1969 and 1970, are simple songs ostensibly for children (includes a strange version of "This Old Man") in the tradition of Raymond Scott. But this is no bliss for babies--this is analogue, vocoder, acid weirdness. Several of the tracks are pulled from his legendary album The Electric Lucifer, an electronic opera of the battle between Heaven and Hell. So don't buy this for your children, buy it for your next trip.

album cover HAACK, BRUCE Hush Little Robot (Q.D.K) lp 17.98

album cover HAACK, BRUCE The Electric Lucifer (The Omni Recording Corporation) cd 17.98
Can you imagine if "Music To Moog By" maestro Gershon Kingsley had dropped acid, joined a commune, got religion, and jammed with the Silver Apples and Lothar And The Hand People? That might approximate what the unique, wondrous psych-pop "Mooglove" of 1969's The Electric Lucifer sounds like!
YES!!! It's about time. We've always wanted this album to come out on cd. This HAD to be our Record Of The Week. Heck, years and years ago, Allan (long before he worked at Aquarius) became a bit obsessed with this record. He'd found a beat-up old LP of it at a yard sale, bought it mainly 'cause of the title and the freaky colorful cover graphics, and then was blown away by the weird music within. It's what we've described as being "perhaps the most awesomely bizarre psychedelic pre-Kraftwerk electronica album ever to be released on a major label (Columbia) or elsewhere." Allan actually went so far as to try to track down Bruce Haack for an interview, but without any luck (turns out Haack had already passed away back in 1988, a couple years before Allan discovered the record). And Allan's not the only one here at AQ to have a longtime soft spot for this record... so we're all so happy that it's finally, FINALLY been given the cd reissue treatment. It's absurd, really, that this wasn't reissued sooner. The legend of eccentric electronica pioneer Bruce Haack has only grown in recent years. There's been several compilations of his work (Hush Little Robot was the best, since it featured a couple tantalizing cuts from this album), expensive imported Japanese reissues of several of his Moog music albums for kids, a posthumous Electric Lucifer sequel from the vaults, and even a documentary released on DVD, entitled Haack - The King Of Techno! But Haack's crowning glory, his masterpiece The Electric Lucifer, wasn't available at all. Until now. And The Omni Recording Corporation (a label new to us) have done it right, even down to the very welcome notion of including a 5-minute track of silence to separate the 13 tracks of the album proper from the over thirty minutes of additional bonus material that they've added on -- which consists of a 1970 Canadian radio interview with Haack on the subject of Electric Lucifer and an alternate take of "Electric To Me Turn". The packaging is top notch as well, reproducing the amazing artwork and Haack's trippy sleevenotes from the original LP (wherein he discusses his concept of "Powerlove"), plus cramming tons of additional stuff into the thick cd booklet. There's loving liner notes by several of Haack's friends and colleagues and lots of vintage photos and graphics. Nicely done.
How can we explain the utter charm of this album? Well it's about as psychedelic as you can get, a concept album that's futuristic and Biblically ancient at the same time. Haack used an electronic "computer voice" (long before it was cliche) that he named FARAD, as well as regular human vocals, to convey deep Age of Aquarius astrological/philosophical concepts, sometimes in the form of sinister liturgies, at others like playful rhyming lullabies. These Moogy, moody and groovy compositions feature churchy organ sounds, bleeps and bloops, and rhythmic percolations that wouldn't sound out of place in the Star Wars cantina. There's lugubrious droney passages, mechanical beats, switched-on classical flourishes, and musique concrete style sound collage. Very weird *and* oh-so-catchy. It's definitely every bit as wonderful and essential as the Silver Apples albums, which we know so many AQ patrons love dearly. Again, we're so happy this has been reissued. Highest recommendation. Listen to the love angel, people!
MPEG Stream: "Electric To Me Turn"
MPEG Stream: "National Anthem To The Moon"
MPEG Stream: "Program Me "
MPEG Stream: "Word Game"

HAACK, BRUCE The Electric Lucifer (Columbia) lp 12.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
Vinyl only reissue of this computerized classic.

album cover HAACK, BRUCE The Electric Lucifer (The Omni Recording Corporation) lp 23.00
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
YAY! Finally a super nice first ever official deluxe vinyl reissue of this all-time aQ fave!! We made Omni's cd reissue of this a Record Of The Week seven years ago, finally they got around to doing their own vinyl version! 180 gram, remastered from the original tapes! Here's what we said when we flipped out over the cd edition:
Can you imagine if "Music To Moog By" maestro Gershon Kingsley had dropped acid, joined a commune, got religion, and jammed with the Silver Apples and Lothar And The Hand People? That might approximate what the unique, wondrous psych-pop "Mooglove" of 1969's The Electric Lucifer sounds like!
YES!!! It's about time. We've always wanted this album to come out on cd. This HAD to be our Record Of The Week. Heck, years and years ago, Allan (long before he worked at Aquarius) became a bit obsessed with this record. He'd found a beat-up old lp of it at a yard sale, bought it mainly 'cause of the title and the freaky colorful cover graphics, and then was blown away by the weird music within. It's what we've described as being "perhaps the most awesomely bizarre psychedelic pre-Kraftwerk electronica album ever to be released on a major label (Columbia) or elsewhere." Allan actually went so far as to try to track down Bruce Haack for an interview, but without any luck (turns out Haack had already passed away back in 1988, a couple years before Allan discovered the record). And Allan's not the only one here at AQ to have a longtime soft spot for this record... so we're all so happy that it's finally, FINALLY been given the cd reissue treatment. It's absurd, really, that this wasn't reissued sooner. The legend of eccentric electronica pioneer Bruce Haack has only grown in recent years. There's been several compilations of his work (Hush Little Robot was the best, since it featured a couple tantalizing cuts from this album), expensive imported Japanese reissues of several of his Moog music albums for kids, a posthumous Electric Lucifer sequel from the vaults, and even a documentary released on dvd, entitled Haack - The King Of Techno! But Haack's crowning glory, his masterpiece The Electric Lucifer, wasn't available at all. Until now. And The Omni Recording Corporation (a label new to us) have done it right, even down to the very welcome notion of including a 5-minute track of silence to separate the 13 tracks of the album proper from the over thirty minutes of additional bonus material that they've added on - which consists of a 1970 Canadian radio interview with Haack on the subject of Electric Lucifer and an alternate take of "Electric To Me Turn". The packaging is top notch as well, reproducing the amazing artwork and Haack's trippy sleeve notes from the original lp (wherein he discusses his concept of "Powerlove"). Nicely done.
How can we explain the utter charm of this album? Well it's about as psychedelic as you can get, a concept album that's futuristic and Biblically ancient at the same time. Haack used an electronic "computer voice" (long before it was cliche) that he named FARAD, as well as regular human vocals, to convey deep Age of Aquarius astrological/philosophical concepts, sometimes in the form of sinister liturgies, at others like playful rhyming lullabies. These Moogy, moody and groovy compositions feature churchy organ sounds, bleeps and bloops, and rhythmic percolations that wouldn't sound out of place in the Star Wars cantina. There's lugubrious droney passages, mechanical beats, switched-on classical flourishes, and musique concrete style sound collage. Very weird *and* oh-so-catchy. It's definitely every bit as wonderful and essential as the Silver Apples albums, which we know so many AQ patrons love dearly. Again, we're so happy this has been reissued. Highest recommendation. Listen to the love angel, people!
MPEG Stream: "Electric To Me Turn"
MPEG Stream: "National Anthem To The Moon"
MPEG Stream: "Program Me "
MPEG Stream: "Word Game"

album cover HAACK, BRUCE The Electronic Record For Children (Dimension 5 / King) cd 26.00
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
There was a time not too long ago when Bruce Haack was simply an anomalous footnote in the history of electronic music. But thanks to the rise of (for the lack of a more specific term) experimental music and the good folks making it, the gospel was spread and steps were taken to lift Haack's dedicated life's work out of the doomed classification of 'incredibly strange music'. In the late '90s, a vinyl reissue of Haack's legendary Electric Lucifer album appeared. Then in 1999, the QDK and Emperor Norton labels issued separate compilations of tracks selected from Haack's massive oeuvre: Hush Little Robot and Listen Compute Rock Home, respectively. These compilations featured a huge chunk of material originally released on Haack's own Dimension 5 imprint (with Listen Compute Rock Home being tagged as a D5 'best-of'), and set off a new generation of record geeks and purveyors of oddly adventurous sounds on the lookout for the original small press LPs.
Introduced in 1963, Dimension 5 was a project created by Haack to reach children, as he believed that music could be a powerfully communicative, and ultimately educational, tool. Along with a host of guest musicians and educators (most notably Miss Esther Nelson), D5 set out to create inspiring and imaginative recordings -- both sonically and narratively -- for children of all ages. Having issued eleven LPs over a span of thirteen years, Dimension 5 is certainly a musical phenomenon worth investigating itself, in addition to the other works of Bruce Haack. Thanks to the sound preservationists at King Record Company over in Japan, we now have access to cd versions of five of the LPs, most of which are unobtainable to many of us due to the high demand and deep pockets of many an eBayer. And with the imminent release of the documentary Haack: The King Of Techno (!), these reissues couldn't be more timely. However, they're expensive, and so we thought maybe it would be best to take 'em one at a time...starting with 1969's The Electronic Record For Children, as it might be the best of the bunch.
This album is credited to Bruce Haack, but also prominently features Miss Nelson. Like the title implies, there is an emphasis on the use of electronics, but the narrative certainly doesn't take a back seat here. There are songs that are indirectly of an educational nature: "First Lady" is a skit in the style of a television game show in which a young girl lists off the names of the US presidents in chronological order, set to a robotic rhythm. Simple enough, but when the host asks the girl to recite the names in reverse order, Haack flips the tape backward, splices and cranks it -- a total mindfuck for kids! Other 'lessons' teach us about rhythmics ("Clapping With Katy"), the compositional use of call and response ("Echo") and the life and daily routines of arachnids ("Spiders"). Inspired by the classes that Miss Nelson and Bruce once taught is the activity song "Dance", a Raymond Scott-fueled rollercoaster ride with wacked out helium vocals. But what stands out most for me on this recording are the songs of an abstract nature. "Mara's Mood" tells the story of 'a boy who tried to grasp the moon' over a loop of fuzzed out psychedelic guitar and synth. "Upside Down" could easily be mistaken for late sixties era British psychedelia a la Twink or Floyd. Quintron fans just might toss out their Quintron records when they hear the completely insane organ and rhythm box track credited, incredibly, to the Planet Of Singing Mice's Greek Cathedral Childrens' Mouse Choir, "Saint Basil". Definitely one of the better of the Dimension 5 releases, though there's something for everyone throughout all of their wondrous recordings!
MPEG Stream: "Upside Down"
MPEG Stream: "Saint Basil"
MPEG Stream: "Mara's Moon"

album cover HAACK, BRUCE The Electronic Record For Children (Mississippi) lp 14.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
**MISSISSIPPI RECORDS ALERT**
This sixties electronic kids' classic reissued on vinyl!! Here's our review from when we listed the (now out of print) import cd version way back in 2004:
There was a time not too long ago when Bruce Haack was simply an anomalous footnote in the history of electronic music. But thanks to the rise of (for the lack of a more specific term) experimental music and the good folks making it, the gospel was spread and steps were taken to lift Haack's dedicated life's work out of the doomed classification of 'incredibly strange music'. In the late '90s, a vinyl reissue of Haack's legendary Electric Lucifer album appeared. Then in 1999, the QDK and Emperor Norton labels issued separate compilations of tracks selected from Haack's massive oeuvre: Hush Little Robot and Listen Compute Rock Home, respectively. These compilations featured a huge chunk of material originally released on Haack's own Dimension 5 imprint (with Listen Compute Rock Home being tagged as a D5 'best-of'), and set off a new generation of record geeks and purveyors of oddly adventurous sounds on the lookout for the original small press lps.
Introduced in 1963, Dimension 5 was a project created by Haack to reach children, as he believed that music could be a powerfully communicative, and ultimately educational, tool. Along with a host of guest musicians and educators (most notably Miss Esther Nelson), D5 set out to create inspiring and imaginative recordings - both sonically and narratively - for children of all ages. Having issued eleven lps over a span of thirteen years, Dimension 5 is certainly a musical phenomenon worth investigating itself, in addition to the other works of Bruce Haack. So here's 1969's The Electronic Record For Children, which just might be the best of the bunch.
This album is credited to Bruce Haack, but also prominently features Miss Nelson. Like the title implies, there is an emphasis on the use of electronics, but the narrative certainly doesn't take a back seat here. There are songs that are indirectly of an educational nature: "First Lady" is a skit in the style of a television game show in which a young girl lists off the names of the US presidents in chronological order, set to a robotic rhythm. Simple enough, but when the host asks the girl to recite the names in reverse order, Haack flips the tape backward, splices and cranks it - a total mindfuck for kids! Other 'lessons' teach us about rhythmics ("Clapping With Katy"), the compositional use of call and response ("Echo") and the life and daily routines of arachnids ("Spiders"). Inspired by the classes that Miss Nelson and Bruce once taught is the activity song "Dance", a Raymond Scott-fueled rollercoaster ride with wacked out helium vocals. But what stands out most for me on this recording are the songs of an abstract nature. "Mara's Mood" tells the story of 'a boy who tried to grasp the moon' over a loop of fuzzed out psychedelic guitar and synth. "Upside Down" could easily be mistaken for late sixties era British psychedelia a la Twink or Floyd. Quintron fans just might toss out their Quintron records when they hear the completely insane organ and rhythm box track credited, incredibly, to the Planet Of Singing Mice's Greek Cathedral Childrens' Mouse Choir, "Saint Basil". Definitely one of the better of the Dimension 5 releases, though there's something for everyone throughout all of their wondrous recordings!
MPEG Stream: "Upside Down"
MPEG Stream: "Saint Basil"
MPEG Stream: "Mara's Moon"

album cover HAAR 2010 EP (self-released) cd ep 8.98
A while back we reviewed a record by Scottish depressive doom laden black metal outfit Vostok, which ended up being a favorite among the aQ black metalheads, so we were psyched to discover that there was a Vostok offshoot called Haar, who take a similar approach to black metal, imbuing it with plenty of gloomy creep and midtempo lumber, even opening up the proceeding with a almost Sabbathy sounding stoner metal dirge, before launching into some proper black buzz. But even over the course of that first track the band constantly slip into a sound much more lurching and dynamic, mathy and a bit proggy, with some dirgey guitar chug, cool double kick drumming, and soaring guitars, all wedded to the weirdly lumbering tempos that only occasionally erupt into full on blast. "To Forgive An Enemy" offers up some darkly melancholy riffage, gnarled and blackened, wreathed in strange spidery melodies, the drums pounding away underneath, which gives way to closer "Without Form Or Void", which is the weirdest of the bunch, all woozy, warped start/stop chug and churn, super mathy and complex, the song's arrangement dizzying, flitting from grinding blast, to classic metal majesty, to murky dirgery and back again, weirdly dissonant, with bellowed clean vocals and hints of classic true doom infused into the band's otherwise twisted black doom crush.
MPEG Stream: "Whisper Serenities Eve"
MPEG Stream: "Without Form Or Void"

album cover HAAR Sky Of Grey (Brotherhood Of Light) cassette 5.98
One of two new tapes this week from the Brotherhood Of Light label, who over the last few months have brought us a bunch of killer releases from Sunchariot, Surt, Uruk Hai as well as a bad ass label sampler. This latest comes from a one band band called Haar, who as far as we can tell, is the work of the man behind the label, as well as both Sunchariot and Surt (or at least someone also involved in the Brotherhood Of Light horde), and like those two groups, Haar traffics in a mournful blasting black metal, super lo-fi, with frenzied insectoid riffing, bellowed vokills, and drums blasting away, but those drums mostly buried WAY down in the mix, the overall result definitely benefits from the raw production, turning minimal black buzz into something droney and almost psychedelic, the sounds blurring into one another, washed out and super hypnotic, doused in what sound like weird FX, but could just be fucked up tape and recording process, the tape hiss almost as loud as the guitars, which give the whole thing a sort of BM by way of Jeck or Tim Hecker vibe, at least a little bit. And yet, as primitive and low fidelity as the sound is, the guitars here are fucking fierce, some seriously bad ass riffing, that sometimes seem to soar into dense tangles of blackshred, the whole thing a dizzying blackened slab frantic blast and buzz, all underpinned by a haunting moody shimmer. And be warned, even with our Walkman as loud as it would go, it was still not very loud, so be prepared to CRANK IT, and be rewarded with ears full of glorious lo-fi hypno-trance, black buzz.

album cover HAARE Chemical Witchcraft (Kult Of Nihilow) lp 28.00
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
We listed the 7" by these guys ages ago, and in that review coined the term DRONOISE for whatever it is that Haare do. A roiling black mass of distorted dark ambient, and slow motion abstract free-doom, that record went out of print in no time (it was limited to 270 copies after all) and we've been waiting patiently for more. And now it's finally here.
Another split release between two Finnish labels, Kult Of Nihilow (Fleshpress, Dot [.]. Marzuraan, Boris, Church Of Misery) and Freak Animal (a noise/drone/industrial sublabel of the mighty Northern Heritage). This Finnish one man band continue of from where that 7", and their last full length (The Temple, a Julian Cope Head Heritage record of the month!) left off.
Beginning with an avalanche of skree and shimmer, Haare navigates his strange vessel, assembled from skulls and bones, sticks and twigs, leaves and dried flesh, through four extended soundscapes, each rife with high end, but offering much in the way of deep rumbling drones and buzzing black ambience. Everywhere fall hailstorms of corroded crumbling melody, so blackened they appear more as grey smears than anything resembling melodies. Malfunctioning machinery groans and whirs, clouds of warped effects are shot through with streaks of feedback like shafts of sunlight, explosions of post industrial chaos, riffs pulled to pieces, the parts nothing but jagged shards of crumbling shimmer and decayed drone, everything bathed in a gritty, grimey unearthly glow. It almost sounds like Avarus and Yellow Swans, dosed with LSD and sealed up in a cave with nothing but some busted amps, guitars with no strings, a junky 4-track and the spirit of the undead cave dwellers.
Creepy and noisy, heavy and drone-y, buzzy and blackened and almost psychedelic.
Unfortunately, like the 7" before it, this is crazy limited, ONLY 275 COPIES!! And almost out of print at the label. We got a bunch, but they won't last long. And once they're gone, there's a good chance we won't be able to get more.

album cover HAARE Death Happening (Turgid Animal) 7" 12.98

album cover HAARE Madon Evankeliumi (At War With False Noise) cd 14.98
A brand new record from Finnish psychedelic noise alchemists Haare, and it's a doozy, two tracks, nearly 32 minutes of thick, swirling, blackened, corrosive crunch, and crumbling blackdrone shimmer.
Ritualistic and caustic, this is the sort of noise music we can get behind. Not white noise, but more like dense clouds of grey and brown noise, gristly, and crunchy, and abrasive, but simultaneously textured and layered, an epic and expansive sprawl of industrial thrum and buzzdrenched ambience. And there's organ. Lots of it. Creepy and haunting and mysterious, turning the noisiness into something way more chilling, it's like a blacknoise haunted house, or the sort of soundtrack you wish real scary movies would have, where the music elicits and evokes the same sort of horror and the visuals. And here, the organ also manages to settle and smooth out the sound, turning it into a more tranquil, almost soft noise, a blurred, blasted, coruscating ambience that is also moody and mournful and melancholy. Imagine Merzbow or Ramleh reinterpreting the soundtrack to Carnival Of Souls. Fuck yeah.
The second track is like a super charged, extra filthy and crusty version of the first, the organ still present, but way lower in the mix, the other sounds more fierce and frantic, streaks of feedback and squalls of blackpsych swirl, a furious sonic storm that again deftly straddles the line between speaker melting pummel, and blown out atmospheric softnoise drone.
So killer. And definitely a possible entree into the noise world for those who have yet to take that first terrifying step. And for sure just psychedelic enough to appeal to folks into all that blissed out, heavy dronepsych weirdness.
LIMITED TO 500 COPIES! In a eye popping full color A5 sized sleeve, featuring cover art by Andrew Labanaris, who has done art for Electric Wizard, Moss and others...
MPEG Stream: "The Crimson Sabbath"

album cover HAARE Rautapilvi (Prison Tatt) lp 16.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
Almost before we even heard this, we knew it had to be an aQ Record Of The Week. A double dose of Finnish sonic insanity in the form of this insanely limited one sided 12", which finds Finnish one-man psychedelic noise project Haare, aka Ilkka Vekka, creating his new record, a single sprawling twenty minute soundscape, from various sounds, much of which is sourced from the 2004 album Forest by fellow Finns and all-time AQ faves, Circle!
Here Haare transforms what was already an atmospheric, sort of acoustic sinister spookiness, into something even more abstract, an arcane sonic ritual, all deep resonant rumbles, keening distant tones, rumbling thrums, haunting chimes, murky melodies, clouds of blurred metallic shimmer drifting over softly undulating sprawls of moody murk, a swirling smear of all manner of gauzy melodies, and ever-shifting texture. The sound barely obscuring creepy monstrous low end rumbles, that sound like some sort of demonic crooning. The upper register tones, sounding a bit like bowed metals, muted and muddied into sonorous tones, but that metallic buzz gradually breaking free from the murk and the mire, intensifying like some swarm of metal insects, way off in the distance, a sort of blurry buzz that billows ominously around the softly roiling ambience at the track's core. The sound obviously moving in a noisier direction, but finding a sort of swirling almost serene stasis just on this side of that ambience/noise barrier, the sounds gristly and crackling with energy, infused with a haunting dark mystery, that seems to imbue all the buzz and crunch with something much more soft focus and abstract, which somehow gradually attains a strange sort of next level dreamlike ambience, all the sounds blurring into a bleary bit of washed out thrum, a thick layered wall of super active sound, but with all the edges worn away, resulting in a slow pulsing stream of warm whir and dense warm dreamnoise, which reaches a sort of bliss out near-raga equillibrium in the last few minutes, and definitely has the listener in a total trance, and had us really wishing there was a second side.
LIMITED TO 100 COPIES, each one hand numbered!!
MPEG Stream: "Rautapilvi (Excerpt 1)"
MPEG Stream: "Rautapilvi (Excerpt 2)"

album cover HAARE Sacred Mushroom Clouds (Freak Animal / Kult Ov Nihilow) 7" 7.50
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
Released on Freak Animal (a Northern Heritage offshoot dedicated to noise and industrial and drone music) and Kult Of Nihilow (home to Fleshpress, Dot [.]. Marzuraan, Boris, Church Of Misery, Ox) this ULTRA LIMITED 7" (only 270 copies!!!) is a massive slab of "dronoise" (just made that up but it's the perfect genre for stuff like this): dense clouds of caustic feedback, murky and thick and heavy, a bit like Sunroof! on some seriously bad drugs, the blissful raga vibe twisted and distorted into a roiling pit of black guitars and crumbling buzz. Side A is relentless and like dunking your head into a black hole. By side B the sound smoothes out a bit (only a bit) into a super harsh low end dronescape, huge tectonic rumbles beneath a swirling swarm of high end feedback squeals and streaks of barbed fuzz. Like Total on PCP.
LIMITED To 270 COPIES, we got about a dozen so act fast.

album cover HAARE The Temple (Freak Animal) cd 14.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.

album cover HAARP The Filth (Housecore) cd 14.98
We originally thought these Southern sludgelords were just adding a letter to their name to make it cooler, you know, like Mutiilation with two 'i's, or Wooden Shjips with a 'j', or Celestiial also with two 'i's, but it seems that perhaps they are named after a certain High Frequency Active Aural Research Program, a program seemingly designed to explore radio communication via the ionosphere, but it reads more like some sort of weaponized sound to us. And hell, if weaponized sound is what you're after, look no further than these New Orleans heavies, who we had previously heard sharing a split with fellow Southern crushers Thou, and you know any band with the sonic balls to throw down with a group like Thou, well, needless to say, prepare to have your ass handed to you.
Which is precisely what'll happen, about 10 seconds into this, Haarp's debut, a crusty, filthy, pummeling slab of epic downtuned NOLA style crush. It's pretty impossible to not think of Eyehategod when it comes to this sort of stuff, and seeing as these boys were drinking the same water, it makes sense that The Filth definitely has the feel of EHG worship, but like Thou, they definitely have their own take on this sludge/doom/dirge thing, most notably the vocals, a fierce, monstrous bellow, WAY up in the mix, that sounds more death metal than sludge metal, sort of Chris Barnes crossed with Phil Anselmo (this was released on Anselmo's Housecore label after all), a voice that perfectly suits Haarp's slow-mo swagger and caveman pummel.
Slow, groovy, heavy as fuck, but with some surprising bits mixed in here and there, surprising super melodic stretches, psychedelic guitar leads, some classic metal harmonies, but for the most part this is an epic skull caving rib cage rattling avalanche of black hole slo-mo sound, absolutely required listening for doomlords into the usual slow and low suspects: Eyehategod, Cough, Thou, The Body, Buzzov-en, etc...
MPEG Stream: "The Rise, The Fall"
MPEG Stream: "All, Alone"
MPEG Stream: "The Blue Chamber Painted Red"

HAAS, ANDY Arnhem Land (Avant) cd 19.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
The unusual didjeridu of Haas meets up in improv duets with guests Fred Frith (guitar), Keiji Haino (voice), Ikue Mori (drum machines), Cyro Baptista (percussion), Anthony Coleman (organ), and Makigamai Koichi (voice).

HAAZZ & COMPANY Unlawful Noise (Atavistic / Unheard Music Series) cd 14.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
The Unheard Music series brings us another '70s free improv rarity. Dutch pianist Kees Hazevoet might not be a well-known name, but he was an early, integral player on the Amersterdam jazz scene back in the day, and on this 1976 album he is joined by what are certainly some big names: Peter Brotzmann, Han Bennink (and his brother Peter), Louis Moholo, and Johnny Dyani.

album cover HABIBIYYA, THE If Man But Knew (Sunbeam) cd 16.98
We were intrigued the moment we saw a copy of this reissued early '70s Eastern-influenced tranquil psych gem. The back cover displays dark and mysteries photos of the five men in The Habibiya. All clad in turbans and sporting long beards (whoops, actually one's a woman and she's not bearded!). We could almost hear the mystique before we pushed play. When we did finally listen we were steadily reeled into their raga like hypnotic sounds, influenced heavily by the music of Sufi Muslims from Morocco, where they visited on what was apparently an extremely moving trip for them in 1971. In fact we had no idea at first that The Habibiyya weren't from somewhere in the East, as the music we were hearing sounded so effortless and true. We later learned that they were in fact from London and featured ex-members of Mighty Baby (kind of the UK equivalent of The Grateful Dead). But where the Mighty Baby stuff we heard was cool and jammy it never really transported us like this recording does. It's music to close your eyes to, as the rich sounds sweep you away, aiming for the sky as its deep hitting core glows with an undeniable spiritual force. While most bands of the era had their backstage area filled with booze and groupies, The Habibiyya mostly just had books with them backstage like the I Ching and texts from mystic minds like G.I. Gurdjieff and Aleister Crowley.
Using zither, piano, banjo, oboe, koto, shakuhachis and an adaptation of classical Moroccan Andalusi singing they were able to create a sound that felt both ancient and timeless. We can all agree that what usually happens when Western musicians try to tap into an eastern sound and feeling, is that the sound can fall miserably short, sounding tepid and watered down, but there are those special rare occasions, when regardless of origin or location, musicians can tap into a special spirit and make sounds that transcend place and time. The Habibiyya did just that!
MPEG Stream: "The Eye-Witness"
MPEG Stream: "Peregrinations Continued"
MPEG Stream: "Bird In God's Garden"

album cover HABIBIYYA, THE If Man But Knew (Sunbeam) 2lp 34.00
Now availiable on 180g double-vinyl!
We were intrigued the moment we saw a copy of this reissued early '70s Eastern-influenced tranquil psych gem. The back cover displays dark and mysteries photos of the five men in The Habibiya. All clad in turbans and sporting long beards (whoops, actually one's a woman and she's not bearded!). We could almost hear the mystique before we pushed play. When we did finally listen we were steadily reeled into their raga like hypnotic sounds, influenced heavily by the music of Sufi Muslims from Morocco, where they visited on what was apparently an extremely moving trip for them in 1971. In fact we had no idea at first that The Habibiyya weren't from somewhere in the East, as the music we were hearing sounded so effortless and true. We later learned that they were in fact from London and featured ex-members of Mighty Baby (kind of the UK equivalent of The Grateful Dead). But where the Mighty Baby stuff we heard was cool and jammy it never really transported us like this recording does. It's music to close your eyes to, as the rich sounds sweep you away, aiming for the sky as its deep hitting core glows with an undeniable spiritual force. While most bands of the era had their backstage area filled with booze and groupies, The Habibiyya mostly just had books with them backstage like the I Ching and texts from mystic minds like G.I. Gurdjieff and Aleister Crowley.
Using zither, piano, banjo, oboe, koto, shakuhachis and an adaptation of classical Moroccan Andalusi singing they were able to create a sound that felt both ancient and timeless. We can all agree that what usually happens when Western musicians try to tap into an eastern sound and feeling, is that the sound can fall miserably short, sounding tepid and watered down, but there are those special rare occasions, when regardless of origin or location, musicians can tap into a special spirit and make sounds that transcend place and time. The Habibiyya did just that!
MPEG Stream: "The Eye-Witness"
MPEG Stream: "Peregrinations Continued"
MPEG Stream: "Bird In God's Garden"

album cover HABITAT SOUND SYSTEM Meets Prince Zohar And The Mystics (Gematria) cd 9.98
Wow! This is by far the best modern dub record we've heard in ages! And you know we love us some vintage dub (Lee Perry, King Tubby, Prince Jammy, etc.) but we've been pretty underwhelmed with so much newly recorded dub these days. Most dub records recorded in the last decade tend to be nothing more but slick exercises in smoothed out reggae and cheesy electronics. Maybe perfect for swanky lounges and as backdrops for radio dj's but when we want dub we want it to be in our face, raw and vibrant, sizzling and brimming with heat and magic. And the debut full length from Habitat Sound System delivers just that!
This is REAL dub, designed to ring in your ears and move your body. No laptops or electronic middle of the road shortcuts here, instead you get a record that echoes with the true sound of organic dub. The instrumentation includes bass, piano, melodica, harmonica, organ, trumpet, electric and acoustic guitar, array mbira, analog synth and of course tasty blown out vocals. When demos from this record started surfacing, dub folks were freaking out, as they were hungry for something new and exciting in a scene that had been overtaken by dull and predictable modern dub, drab and boring and so pointless. Even some of the true originals like Scientist and Mad Professor heard this and gave it major props, in fact Mad Professor ended up doing additional mixing, and even mastered the disc. We first heard Habitat Sound System, fronted by Irwin's brother Preston, earlier this year on a great split with Monosov Swirnoff on Eclipse records, and while this is a way different beast than what Swirnoff does when he plays with Ilya Monosov or in his psych-rock outfit The Shining Path, there is no doubt that he definitely has his finger on the pulse of dub in a way that's been totally kicking our asses! When we first got this in and were playing it in the store, it not only had everyone working nodding their heads and subtly sort of grooving, but customers who instantly bought copies didn't believe us when we told them it was a brand new record, as they were convinced that this was a lost seventies gem from Jamaica. Truth is, Habitat Sound System have created a timeless and near perfect slab of summery dub.
So damn good and of course highly recommended!
MPEG Stream: "Black Sugar Dub"
MPEG Stream: "Hard Rope Dub"
MPEG Stream: "Eritrean Lovers Dub"

album cover HABITAT SOUND SYSTEM The Honeydripper (Gematria) 10" 14.98
Many of you might remember that several years ago we flipped for the debut release from Habitat Sound System, a dub-centric project lead by Preston Swirnoff (Monosov/Swirnoff, The Shining Path, etc, and our very own Irwin's brother!). It was one of the most warm and authentic sounding new dub records we had heard in ages.
We've been patiently waiting for more, and the wait was so worth it! This new 10" finds HSS expanding their sound, into something warmer, more lush, more mystical. While it's still rooted in the history of classic dub, it's a looser and more expansive interpretation this time out. Any time you can make a record that sounds perfect alongside David Axelrod, Cedric Im Brooks, Count Ossie, any Ethiopiques collection, and even a Slits record, you've stumbled onto something so deliciously golden and unique!
It's refreshing to hear all these analog sounds set amidst some truly rich instrumentation - organ, piano, melodica, synths, guitar, horns, flute, balafon, bass. Swirnoff and his talented entourage (David Hurley, Ilya Monosov, Zuri Waters, Manny Vega, etc) are modern masters. One minute a song is riding a thick dubbed out groove, and then suddenly in comes some tripped out psych guitar transforming the sound into something impossibly lush and hypnotic...
While most modern groups trying to make classic sounding dub these days play it safe by going the predictable ultra minimal route, This 10" demonstrates the exciting possibility of having a more expansive musical vision and using dub as a backdrop to that music, stretching the sound, sparkling, twisting and turning, creating a whole new sound that hits so hard, deep and emotionally resonant... Highly recommended!
(There were only 300 of these pressed, and we only have a handful, so you know what that means.)

album cover HABITAT SOUND SYSTEM Zebras In The Dancehall (Gematria) 7" 4.98
Limited edition 7" from one of our favorite modern day dub makers. Features a brand new track that was not on the full length that we flipped out about a few years back. The 'b' side is a remix by Dub Traffik Control. We only have a couple of these laying around and then this is gone for good.

album cover HABOOB s/t (Long Hair) cd 27.00

album cover HABSYLL MMVIII (tUMULt / At War With False Noise / PsycheDOOMelic / Obscure Sombre / Odio Sonoro / Skyr) cd 11.98
We thought these were gone for good, having been sold out and out of print for several years now, but a stash was discovered tucked way, and thus this killer slab of abstract avant sludge is available again, but who knows for how long...
It's starting to get seriously tUMULtuous around here once again. With the arrival of this, the first full length record from French ultra-mega-abstract-doom trio Habsyll, which just so happens to feature one member of the mighty Fantastikol Hole, as well as the former drummer of faerical punk blasters Nuit Noire! Both BIG time aQ faves!
But nothing, and we mean nothing will prepare you for Habsyll's particularly virulent strain of ultradoom. Heavy and slow, yeah obviously, but it's HOW heavy (very) and HOW slow (ummm, so slow the songs seem to have almost zero forward momentum) that makes Habsyll something much more than a metal band or a doom band, it's almost like twentieth century classical played with downtuned guitars and massive drums. So much space, the notes and drum beats miles apart, the drums not so much beats and rhythms (although those do pop up occasionally) as brief explosions or percussive squalls, more for dynamics and texture, or if they are actually engaged in some sort of actual beat, it's mind bendingly abstract and extended and slow to the point of hovering around 2 or 3 bpm. Think Khanate, Monarch, Moss, Bunkur, Fleshpress? You're already thinking too fast, too structured, too riffy. This is some excessive extremist radical dooooooooom, the sort of chug and plod and buzz and bombinate that makes the rest of those bands sound like speed metal.
But in this slow sprawl, and these long stretches of decay, these sudden flurries of drum splatter and downtuned chug, there is a buried beauty, occasionally, these disparate parts mesh into a brief flicker of melody, or a single epic majestic hook filled swell, before slipping back into blackness. And once or twice the band ramps it up, and locks into some serious pounding crushing black hole sludge, but even then, it's a crawl, a glacial black ooze tempo, and before too long, the band abandon any sense of rhythm or tempo, opting instead to drift through some wide open stretch of outerspace ultra doom emptiness.
The guitars go from grinding and sharp, to muddy and massive, the chugs flung into the ether and carried along on streaks of whirring hiss and blackened buzz, spitting out huge jagged shards of feedback, and long smears of blurred anti-riffage, the bass is a massive cloud of low end, throbbing and pulsing, exploding like a brick wall to the side of the head before slipping back into a shadowy rumble, the vocals a caustic demonic shriek, raspy and hellish, slipping into an almost hysterical falsetto, and just as often offering up some alien ululations, and the drums, oh the drums, any drummer can tell you how hard it is to play slow, but they're talking slowcore slow, or even regular doom slow, this is something else entirely, this is doom drumming gone free jazz, pound and skitter in equal measure, meting out beats one at a time, like some sleek black submarine releasing depth charges.
Two lengthy epics, 17 minutes and nearly 29 minutes, neither very traditionally doomlike, but both most definitely doom, maybe more 'doom', than most actual doom we've heard. Like staring into the abyss, or looking up at a black moonless night sky, these sounds are the sounds of emptiness, of bottomless depths, of never ending expanses of space and time, the end of the world, the birth of new universes, the sound of black holes, of exploding stars, the soundtrack to the end of the world, to the end of everything. Slow and heavy and low and spaced out and damaged and fucked up and strangely beautiful and mysterious and abstract and far out and completely kick ass while remaining very very very difficult listening indeed!
This is a split label release, tUMULt of course, along with 5 other kick ass labels: At War With False Noise, Obscure Sombre, PsycheDOOMelic, Skyr and Odio Sonoro.
MPEG Stream: "II"
MPEG Stream: "I"

album cover HACKAMORE BRICK One Kiss Leads To Another (Sony / Real Gone Music) cd 14.98
Holy moly, at long LONG last a proper reissue of this should-be-much-better-known vintage rock classic! Seriously, this is one of those albums, where it's like, how come this hasn't been reissued before?! Why aren't the band's chief songwriters Chick Newman and Tommy Moonlight famous? Ok, it's been bootlegged previously, but not even as much as it "should" have been. You can hear these songs for the very first time and they'll sound like comfy old favorites. Hitherto lucky collectors only were hip to this (Allan here thanks Tim Ellison from the 'zine Rock Mag for tuning him on to Hackamore Brick years and years ago - we shoulda asked Tim to write this review, come to think of it, but we'll try to do it justice).
Hackamore Brick was a New York City band playing a special brand of laidback urban folk-rock / power pop, super catchy songs with jangly guitars, that are also very moody and bittersweet sounding. Their biggest influences seem to be both the Velvet Underground and The Byrds, and they live up to 'em on this, their only full-length, released in 1970 on bubblegum label Kama Sutra - though while sometimes sunny (through clouds) this sure ain't bubblegum. What this is, is a feast of great songs. They're all really good, it was tough for us to pick which ones to make sound samples for. One Kiss Leads To Another (a lyric from the track "Oh! Those Sweet Bananas" - they have a thing for quirky song titles) provides plenty of wonderfully melancholic, nostalgic earworm action, full of acoustic strum, hovering electric organ, clever if curious lyrics (with some unusual rhymes), and lovely, roughhewn vocal harmonies.
Of course, Hackamore Brick never made it commercially - you can hear maybe how this was a bit too REAL and raw and a bit too weird for the Top 40 pop charts of the day - but they belong in the Top 40 of anyone who appreciates offbeat brilliance. The Byrdisan West Coast element to their sound definitely means that folks who liked another recent reissue of a long-lost-obscure-gem, the Anonymous album, should also check this out. Also for fans of The Modern Lovers, Big Star, and plenty of latter day lo-fi indie pop.
Remastered, with new liner notes, this also includes bonus tracks, one on the vinyl and three on the cd, both formats including their pretty rockin' cover of Leiber & Stoller's "Searchin'" from their lone post-album single. We are so stoked on this!!! Buy it, you might find yourself a new favorite, formerly long lost album.
MPEG Stream: "Reachin'"
MPEG Stream: "Oh! Those Sweet Bananas"
MPEG Stream: "Got A Girl Named Wilma"

album cover HACKAMORE BRICK One Kiss Leads To Another (Sony / Real Gone Music) lp 22.00
Holy moly, at long LONG last a proper reissue of this should-be-much-better-known vintage rock classic! Seriously, this is one of those albums, where it's like, how come this hasn't been reissued before?! Why aren't the band's chief songwriters Chick Newman and Tommy Moonlight famous? Ok, it's been bootlegged previously, but not even as much as it "should" have been. You can hear these songs for the very first time and they'll sound like comfy old favorites. Hitherto lucky collectors only were hip to this (Allan here thanks Tim Ellison from the 'zine Rock Mag for tuning him on to Hackamore Brick years and years ago - we shoulda asked Tim to write this review, come to think of it, but we'll try to do it justice).
Hackamore Brick was a New York City band playing a special brand of laidback urban folk-rock / power pop, super catchy songs with jangly guitars, that are also very moody and bittersweet sounding. Their biggest influences seem to be both the Velvet Underground and The Byrds, and they live up to 'em on this, their only full-length, released in 1970 on bubblegum label Kama Sutra - though while sometimes sunny (through clouds) this sure ain't bubblegum. What this is, is a feast of great songs. They're all really good, it was tough for us to pick which ones to make sound samples for. One Kiss Leads To Another (a lyric from the track "Oh! Those Sweet Bananas" - they have a thing for quirky song titles) provides plenty of wonderfully melancholic, nostalgic earworm action, full of acoustic strum, hovering electric organ, clever if curious lyrics (with some unusual rhymes), and lovely, roughhewn vocal harmonies.
Of course, Hackamore Brick never made it commercially - you can hear maybe how this was a bit too REAL and raw and a bit too weird for the Top 40 pop charts of the day - but they belong in the Top 40 of anyone who appreciates offbeat brilliance. The Byrdisan West Coast element to their sound definitely means that folks who liked another recent reissue of a long-lost-obscure-gem, the Anonymous album, should also check this out. Also for fans of The Modern Lovers, Big Star, and plenty of latter day lo-fi indie pop.
Remastered, with new liner notes, this also includes bonus tracks, one on the vinyl and three on the cd, both formats including their pretty rockin' cover of Leiber & Stoller's "Searchin'" from their lone post-album single. We are so stoked on this!!! Buy it, you might find yourself a new favorite, formerly long lost album.
MPEG Stream: "Reachin'"
MPEG Stream: "Oh! Those Sweet Bananas"
MPEG Stream: "Got A Girl Named Wilma"

HACO Happiness Proof (Detector) cd 9.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
US release of a new solo album by Japanese avant-garde vocalist/composer Haco, who used to sing for the prog-pop band After Dinner. More recently, she formed the wonderful Hoahio trio with Sachiko M and Yagi Michiyo. Fans of that group (we listed their recent Tzadik album not long ago) will definitely enjoy "Happiness Proof". It's a similar sort of unpredictable electronic-infused avant-pop. Haco gets a little help from her friends, as lots of interesting folks appear on this disc -- it's almost a who's-who of Japanese underground scenesters: Tsuyama Atsushi (Omoide Hatoba, Acid Mothers Temple, Akaten, etc.), Yamamoto Seiichi (Boredoms, Omoide Hatoba, etc.), Uchihashi Kazuhisa (Altered States, Ground Zero, etc. -- he plays daxophone on here as well as guitar!), and turntablist Otomo Yoshihide (Ground Zero, ISO, etc.), among others. There's also contributions from Belgian Pierre Bastien and his Mecanium, a mechanical orchestra. Delightful. Note the nice price too!

album cover HADEN, PETRA Sings: The Who Sell Out (Bar None) cd 16.98
Ladies and gentlemen, may we direct your attention to the center stage for... The Petra Haden Singers! Well, not quite... make that singular not plural, but the classically trained lady's tackling a full chorus' worth of parts. This is Ms Haden's COMPLETELY acapella performance of the COMPLETE The Who Sell Out album. We've gotta give the gal props not only for her vocal arrangin' skills but also for the thoroughness of her savvy cover art replication job. Check out those photos! They're a total hoot! Nonetheless, we'd wager that whether or not this cd finds a permanent place in your library will ultimately depend not on your love for The Who, the original album, nor Ms Haden, but rather on your appreciation for acapella music. Each song is pretty much simple and straight up, somewhat generic female-sung acapella. Y'know the kinda bland but pleasantly out of the ordinary stuff they might have on some TV talk show to spice the afternoon up a little. So, although she's unarguably accomplished an impressive feat, unfortunately the end results make for much less remarkable listening than anticipated or hoped for.
MPEG Stream: "I Can See For Miles"
MPEG Stream: "Sunrise"

album cover HADEWYCH Nu (Black Horizons) cassette 8.98
It's been over 4 years since we last heard from these guys, having raved about a stunningly handcrafted cd release back in 2010. Their sound, at the time, described as "black rituals for the vastness-appreciative", which essentially amounted to haunting black ambience and dark, minimal dronescapery, and their M.O. hasn't changed too much on this new tape via local label Black Horizons. Three tacks of creeping sonic malevolence, and brooding sinister soundscapes, if anything, their sound has developed into something a bit more industrial, the opener all dark chimes and shimmering metallics, pointalist piano and soft swirls of FX, spoken word vocals, and motorik percussion, the black ambience seemingly blossoming into a sort of death industrial, a lumbering gloom rock, slowed way down, flecked with moaning horns, and thick rumbling bass, distorted synth blurt, smears of chordal shimmer, giving way to something almost like black jazz, a soft noise drenched drift that unfurls like a black fog, anchored by spare percussion, and twisted fractured anti-rhythms, culminating in the hazy, dreamy closer, a swath of distorted thrum, draped over more spoken word, glacial riffage, spread out into blurred drones, before letting all the distortion, grit and grim wash away, leaving just a stretch of hushed shimmer, woozy minimal buzz, and terrifying whispers, a gauzy, darkly psychedelic finale, a slow build/fade blackened, mysterious and otherworldly. Whew.
Like all Black Horizons release, the packaging is exquisite, a die cut six panel J-card, silver metallic ink on matte black, black and silver cassettes, and of course EXTREMELY LIMITED, only 100 COPIES!!

album cover HADEWYCH s/t (Tuchtunie) cd 13.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
We first heard about these guys via the awesome Hammer Smashed Sound blog, described as "black rituals for the vastness-appreciative", the band listing their influences as "Movement of woods, rocks, plants & nature as such - plus the vastness of it all. Abyssal fear, fire, wholeness, monolithic things, megaliths, human insignificance, occult systems of cosmology & meaning, open systems of cosmology & meaning, clean violence, swift violence, enlightenment..." PLUS there's the fact that this, their debut record, came housed in a hand crafted leaf encrusted wooden sleeve, so we were pretty much already sold. Thankfully, their blackened sonic rituals more than live up to those obtuse and abstract descriptors, and the stunning packaging.
Black ambience might be too reductive when trying to describe Hadewych's mysterious soundworld, but it's a start. Occultic, ritualistic, grim, mysterious, haunting, all of the tracks here exist in some sort of moonlit nether region, the whole record some sort of fantastic journey, rendered in abstract sound, huge heaving swells of dense drone, muted pits of abstract percussion, softly crumbling bits of ambient whir, the sounds clipped and layered and assembled into lumbering skeletal rhythms, deep processed vocals, intoning some strange prayer, while a bleak black melody plays out in the background, and some super freaky demonic vocals surface, belch out some wordless filth, before splintering and collapsing back into the swirling blackness below.
Dense walls of SUNNO)))-ish rumble dissolve into some skittery almost-electronica, wrapped around more of those freaky belchy vocals, and some shimmery choral vocals overhead, before the record switches gears, and sprawls into some softly glitched pop ambience, all shimmer and drift and hover, laced with haunting strings and whispered vox buried in the mix, chimes ring out, voices are stretched out into warm whirling sun dappled streaks of sound, layered acoustic guitars explode into squalls of blown out psychedelia, infused with intercepted radio broadcasts, a woozy washed out cloud of lumbering crunch and majestic soft noise, only to dissipate into another sprawling bit of rhythmic ambience, with warm soft focus guitars drifting over skittery electronics, and more hushed vox, giving way to a blown out, muffled in-the-red black folk drone, the notes and chords so saturated they sound almost percussive, and the more you listen, the more the various sounds ooze and blend and bleed into one.
Lilting echo drenched folk leads us toward the end of our journey, atonal and buzzy, the steel strings soon fade out, leaving a gorgeous low end stretch of looped and layered tones, a sort of murky minimal pulse, haunting and ominous, and totally hypnotic, a quick burst of clatter and crunch leads us into a field of dense harmonium drone, hissing and wheezing, a gloriously textured expanse of warm whirs, peppered with strange field recordings, the crunch of footsteps, the panting of panicked breathing, which finally leads us to the black path, leading to an emptiness in the center of the black forest, the sound emanating from that void a deep rib cage rattling rumble, shot through with bits of glitch and hiss, and long streaks of some mysterious reverbed rasp, tendrils of feedback, fragments of melody, the shimmer of vibrating steel strings, tolling bells, all gradually blurred into blackness. So intense. Epic and cinematic, like the score to a life lived beneath the looming shadows of the great black oaks, or the soundtrack to a doomed expedition to the underworld, mysterious and evocative, and so so hauntingly beautiful.
LIMITED TO ONLY 165 COPIES, housed in a red felt lined handmade wooden case, with four double-sided cards, the whole thing packed in incense-dried Norway maple leaves. Wow.
MPEG Stream: "Ava"
MPEG Stream: "A Forest For Riss"
MPEG Stream: "Prone"
MPEG Stream: "Bordun"
MPEG Stream: "Gentle Art Of Incineration Pt. 1"

album cover HAEMOTH Kontamination (Southern Lord) cd 14.98

album cover HAEMOTH Mortuales Delecti (Nihilward Productions) cd 13.98
We've said it before. A bunch of times. In lots of reviews, but we'll say it again. There's just something about FRENCH black metal. Not sure what it is exactly, some of it sounds similar, but plenty of it definitely does not, but somehow, there's some ineffable -thing- that makes French black metal, special, hell, maybe BETTER than most black metal. Just off the top of our heads here's a list of French black metal bands (one that we've probably enumerated in other reviews before, but again, it bears repeating): Deathspell Omega, Katharsis, Mutiilation, Antaeus, Blut Aus Nord, Diamatregon, Peste Noire, Vlad Tepes, Aosoth, Hell Militia, Alcest, Otargos, Arrival Of Satan, S.V.E.S.T., Wolok…
So yeah, we love French black metal, and one band we've dug for ages, but never reviewed on the list is this one, Haemoth, who released a couple full lengths back in 2003-2004, but this is a collection of all the band's demos, from 2001-2004, and they KILL. The sound appropriately raw and black, the guitars super distorted and blown out, the vocals sick and processed, and the songs oozing all sorts of crazy atmospheres, the opening track, with headphones on, there's all this weird low end thrum, and strange buried melodies, all swirling and pulsing beneath the buzz and pound, even without headphones it makes the song sound creepy and dense and really really cool. It might be some sort of bass or synth or processed guitar, cuz it's on the next track too, which has some seriously thick crumbling distortion, all laced with lots of drone and weird murk, the sound SO in-the-red, and so crazy heavy, check out the first couple sound samples, you'll be sold.
The older demos are more brittle and lo-fi, but still ooze menacing alien atmosphere, and are bizarrely arranged, and slip from crusty creepy plod to blurred and buzzy blast, the drums murky pulses in the thick swirls of guitarbuzz and howled vokills. There are plenty of drones and ambient breakdowns and lots of weird experimentalism scattered throughout, enough to satisfy folks into the more twisted shit, but raw and grim and black enough for the true / old school black hordes.
MPEG Stream: "Dependance"
MPEG Stream: "Aversion"
MPEG Stream: "Defects & Perversion"

HAEMOTH Vice, Suffering And Destruction (ISO666) cd 14.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.

HAFLER TRIO Mastery of Money (Korm Plastics) cd 22.00
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.

album cover HAFLER TRIO, THE A Ec Ad, Halda Afram? (Important) cd ep 10.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
A Ec Ad, Halda Afram marks the fourth entry in yet another Hafler Trio series. At least for this body of work all published by Important Records, the Hafler Trio has kept his work reasonably priced in spite of its limited release. At the same time, each entry in the Important Records series clocks in at about 20 minutes, so the dollar per musical minute ratio is still about the same. Regardless, A Ec Ad, Halda Afram? is a bit of a departure for the Hafler Trio as Andrew McKenzie drops a slow crawling breakbeat into his sonic transmogrifier. Sounding an awful lot like the devastating beats of Techno Animal or The Bug, these breaks do possess a curious, disjointed warble that makes this uniquely the Hafler Trio. But of course, McKenzie takes almost 10 minutes of his alotted 20 very quietly shuffling around his soundfield before unleashing these breaks. Pretty great and as always, McKenzie leaves us scratching our heads; but one has to wonder if Important will go out of their way to irritate the Hafler Trio fans (and probably Andrew McKenzie for that matter!) by releasing the whole series in a single package much like the Acid Mothers Temple incidient a while back. Remember the Magical Power From Mars series?
No MP3 samples as requested by the Hafler Trio.

album cover HAFLER TRIO, THE A House Waiting For Its Master (Rossbin) 10" 16.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
With so many Hafler Trio releases being released from every corner of the world, it's not surprising that we almost missed this 10" on the Spanish label Rossbin, which typically promotes the austere strains of improv and electro-acoustics. Released earlier in 2004, A House Waiting For Its Master is pressed on a very thick piece of semi-transparent vinyl with three mid-length tracks of the high-quality dronescaping that has become the standard for The Hafler Trio in the past few months. At times, the drones are quite lovely, sounding like David Jackman's placid sustained flute constructions; yet, Andrew McKenzie (the sole member of the Trio) manipulates and modulates his minimalist constructions into abrasive psychoacoustic rumblings and intense acousmatic noises. Stock is limited!

album cover HAFLER TRIO, THE A Thirsty Fish (Korm Plastics) 2cd 24.00
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
When Mute reissued the Golden Hammer series by The Hafler Trio in the mid '90s as part of their Grey Area reissue campaign of industrial and post-industrial masterpieces, Mute dropped nearly 25 minutes of music from The Hafler Trio's perennially obtuse A Thirsty Fish. Nearly a decade later as Korm Plastics has been lovingly reissuing The Hafler Trio's early recordings, A Thirsty Fish now gets a proper re-release as a double disc set, with all of the material from the original 2LP presented in a remastered form. In an interview with Option magazine back in the late '80s, The Hafler Trio's Andrew McKenzie explained that the intent of A Thirsty Fish was "to confuse people until they couldn't think anymore, so they'd have to feel. It was conjuring. The idea was — and still is to a certain extent — watch this hand while the other hand goes into the pockets. The stuff that everybody sees is not actually the whole point. People can't see the whole point because it's like this covert action. But I'm still talking around it, I'm not going to put it in one easy bite-size piece because that would destroy the whole point of what I'm doing. I have a very definite intent, but if I talk about it, it will evaporate. If I put it into words, you'll just have an idea again — and then it's gone. All the stuff you see on the packaging, and the sounds in fact themselves, all that stuff Is just the fluff. The real stuff is actually going on somewhere else." Given the oblique collage techniques of electrified voices, erratically pitch-shifted tape modulations, puncturing noises, pure sine-wave generation, and decontextualized media samples, The Hafler Trio again succeeds in utter confusion.
Sorry, no MP3 samples are available for any Hafler Trio works.

album cover HAFLER TRIO, THE An Utterance Of The Supreme Ventriloquist (Soleilmoon) cd 21.00
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
1996 was a particularly quiet year for the Hafler Trio; whereas in this day and age some nine years later, there's a major Hafler Trio release coming out almost every month or so. While the man behind the Hafler Trio -- Andrew M. McKenzie -- might like you to believe this or that about his slow down in activity during the mid '90s, his paucity of recordings was simply due to the fact that his job at the time kept from his art. How pleasantly mundane of the Gnostic sound sorcerer! Nonetheless, McKenzie did release Utterances of the Supreme Ventriloquist as a very expensive LP edition through Soleilmoon. While it doesn't belong to any of the great triologies (Kill The King / Mastery of Money / How To Reform Mankind) or serial works (The Golden Hammer series), this album fluidly introduces many of the pristine compositions of electric minimalism that grace his recent outpouring of work (How To Slice A Loaf of Bread, etc.), but also enjoys many of the discordant, psychoactive jolts and flourishes of those aforementioned earlier works. Glossalaliac ripples of feedback, terse repetitions of mechanoid rhythms, and immaculate drones meander through a whole host of psychologically tinged soundfields from frightening to holy to meditative to menacing. Beautifully packaged in the same style as the reissues found on Korm Plastics. And again, we cannot offer any MP3s for you to sample per the wishes of the Hafler Trio.

album cover HAFLER TRIO, THE Being A Firefighter Isn't About Squirting Water (Important) cd 10.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
As much as Andrew McKenzie of The Hafler Trio likes to present little bits of Gnostic wisdom in the titles of his records, Being A Firefighter Isn't About Squirting Water is oddly lacking in cleverness, weirdness, obtuseness, Hafler Trio-ness. In case you might think that McKenzie is losing his mastery of allegorical puzzles, metaphorical misdirections, and megalomaniacal obsessiveness, he does boldly claim that this record is "a product that will allow you take charge of your destiny completely." How 20 minutes of subtle wafts of feedback can provide what self-help gurus have been claiming to do for centuries is the precise location for the art of the Hafler Trio. Lest this (or any other Hafler Trio album) be construed as mindless New Ageisms, these wispy fragments of rippled drones have plenty of shadowy forms lurking in the distance, and at least the sense that a profound intellect has constructed this body of work.
Being A Firefighter is the fifth CDEP published by Important Records. As with the rest in the series, this is woefully limited; and as with all Hafler Trio albums, there can be no MP3 samples.

album cover HAFLER TRIO, THE Cleave: 9 Great Openings (Nextera) cd 15.98
Once again The Hafler Trio has all but disappeared from the public eye, with the principal architect Andrew McKenzie choosing a very limited audience in Estonia for his 'sessions' interweaving psychotherapy, sound design, and sleights of hand (amongst other ideas). There have been no recorded works released since 2006, and much of the back catalog is slowly disappearing. Cleave: 9 Great Openings may be one of the last available documents we will offer from The Hafler Trio's inscrutible catalog of gnostic-minimalism, conscious-jamming conceptualizations, and psychoacoustic strategies. This album is the first part of a trilogy of works that McKenzie released during a flurry of activity at the beginning of the millenium. The source material for this album (and perhaps the other two entries in the trilogy) was a gift that McKenzie composed for a friend's wedding ceremony in Nepal. The album is a very slowly paced piece of minimalism paralleling the work of Niblock and Radigue, with a thoughtfully composed set of harmonic intervals that spiral in slow-motion through phasing patterns eventually culminating in a rasping crescendo of sawtooth drones that flutters down to a meditative calm. Ever changing yet wholly hypnotic, Cleave is a masterful album of holy minimalism filtered through the mysteries of the ancients onto a concise 60 minute album. Lovely.
As with all Hafler Trio albums, by decree of the man/band, there shall be no sound samples.

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