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IMPORTANT (Please read to avoid confusion):
Some items below may be tagged with a bold, red, all-caps "out of print/unavailable" notice. This does NOT mean that all other items not so tagged are, in fact, in stock -- or for that matter, in print and available, though there's a good chance they are. Some folks get confused on this point, and we can see why, so please read this for further clarification and other important before-you-order information. Unlike some mailorder websites, we don't have an electronic inventory system linked to our site, so you can't be sure of what we actually have or don't have in stock at any given moment without asking us -- please email our mailorder department for availability status -- or better yet, just go ahead and place your order using our shopping cart function and we'll get back to you with the status of each item. If you have general non-mailorder questions, email the store.


album cover 3 HUR-EL Hurel Arsivi (World Psychedelia Ltd.) cd 17.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
The early nineties saw the big Krautrock revival, while more recently we've seen waves of interest in Swedish psychedelic folk reissues and Latin American garage rock of the sixties. But maybe now the next big old thing is '60s-'70s Middle Eastern psychedelic pop music. Really, soon we're gonna have to dedicate a bin here in the store for all the great (and popular) reissues that have been coming out lately, from the "Turkish Delights" and "Hava Narghile" compilations to albums by The Devil's Anvil and John Berberian's Rock East Ensemble, and most recently Erkin Koray's "Elektronik Turkuler".
Now, here's another one for that bin! It's apparently the second album from the three Hur-el brothers (Feridun, Onur, and Haldun), recorded between 1970 and 1975. A rare LP indeed, the original Diskotur pressing worth $1000+ today we're told. Dunno about that, but it's definitely worth eighteen bucks if you're into the undeniably kick-ass combination of traditional Turkish folk styles with the rock n' roll licks of the West. Middle Easternized rollicking pop rock with acid fuzz guitar and electric piano, plus Eastern ethnic percussion and stringed instruments, and emotive vocals in Turkish. Yup, 3 Hur-el play music that's been called "ethno-psychedelic" and "the heavy hashish sound"...real nice. One of the tracks here also appeared on the "Love Peace & Poetry: Asian Psychedelia" compilation. They also have a track on that "Hava Narghile" comp, but that was from an early single, not this album.
MPEG Stream: "Canim Kurban"
MPEG Stream: "Omur Biter Yol Bitmez"

album cover 3 HUR-EL Hurel Arsivi (Guerssen) lp 26.00
Now available on vinyl!
The early nineties saw the big Krautrock revival, while more recently we've seen waves of interest in Swedish psychedelic folk reissues and Latin American garage rock of the sixties. But maybe now the next big old thing is '60s-'70s Middle Eastern psychedelic pop music. Really, soon we're gonna have to dedicate a bin here in the store for all the great (and popular) reissues that have been coming out lately, from the Turkish Delights and Hava Narghile"compilations to albums by The Devil's Anvil and John Berberian's Rock East Ensemble, and most recently Erkin Koray's Elektronik Turkuler.
Now, here's another one for that bin! It's apparently the second album from the three Hur-el brothers (Feridun, Onur, and Haldun), recorded between 1970 and 1975. A rare LP indeed, the original Diskotur pressing worth $1000+ today we're told. Dunno about that, but it's definitely worth eighteen bucks if you're into the undeniably kick-ass combination of traditional Turkish folk styles with the rock n' roll licks of the West. Middle Easternized rollicking pop rock with acid fuzz guitar and electric piano, plus Eastern ethnic percussion and stringed instruments, and emotive vocals in Turkish. Yup, 3 Hur-el play music that's been called "ethno-psychedelic" and "the heavy hashish sound"...real nice. One of the tracks here also appeared on the Love Peace & Poetry: Asian Psychedelia"compilation. They also have a track on that Hava Narghile comp, but that was from an early single, not this album.
MPEG Stream: "Canim Kurban"
MPEG Stream: "Omur Biter Yol Bitmez"

album cover 3 HUR-EL s/t (Guerssen) lp 26.00
NOW BACK IN PRINT ON VINYL!!! Turkish psych fans! The first album from the Hur-el brothers, a self-titled longplayer from 1972. It's just as 'exotic' as Hurel Arsivi, but less overtly rock n' roll, being even more ethnic in flavor - though it's very far from a purely traditional Turkish music recording! There's definitely Western '60s rock influences, but don't expect much in the way of heavy guitar fuzz-fests. Rather, you'll groove to a infectious rhythmic feast with melodious singing that's rooted in 'old school' Middle Eastern music but has a cool sixties pop-era vibe as well.
The sonorous vocals (all in Turkish) are highlighted, backed by every hipster's 'oriental' beat fantasy. 3 Hur-el are equally effective when playing uptempo dances, or much slower, moodier numbers, so the whole disc's a treat.
MPEG Stream: "Ve Olum"
MPEG Stream: "Lazoglu"

album cover AKBAYRAM DOSTLAR, EDIP Nedir Ne Degildir? (Pharaway) cd 17.98
Having recently reissued hard rocking Turkish '70s pop star Edip Akbayram's self-titled 1974 debut, now Pharaway Sounds moves on to the man's next album, done with his killer band Dostlar (Friends), originally released in 1977. It's a severe collision of Western electric rock and Middle Eastern folk, akin to other vintage Turkish psych faves like Mogollar, 3 Hur-el and Erkin Koray, but particularly '70s-sounding in a polyester suit, shag carpet kind of way.
The very first track might throw you for a loop, but past that sappy, poppy number with its soft-rock strings and horns and tinkling piano, this record suddenly gets a whole lot rockier, heavier, and funkier. Imagine an Anatolian Pop score for some groovy car-chase flick... the schlocky, sizzling vintage '70s synths enhance the kitsch value and sound good amidst the traditional ethnic instrumentation (arranged by one of the Mogollar guys). Edip and the Dostlar dudes dish out the hard rock and funk with a groovy bottom end, plenty of psych guitar riffage, Edip's powerful vocals and wah-wah augmented Turkish saz. With proggy weirdness like flute attacks and studio tape speed manipulation, this is some badass 'exotica' for sure. Anyone addicted to the Turkish psych rock scene-sound from back in the hazy day like we are will find this a fine addition to their collection. Remastered, includes extensive new liner notes by Andrea Sawyer of Weirdo Records.
MPEG Stream: "Arabam Kaldi Yolda"
MPEG Stream: "Kolum Nerden Aldin Zinciri"

album cover AKBAYRAM DOSTLAR, EDIP Nedir Ne Degildir? (Pharaway) lp 28.00
Having recently reissued hard rocking Turkish '70s pop star Edip Akbayram's self-titled 1974 debut, now Pharaway Sounds moves on to the man's next album, done with his killer band Dostlar (Friends), originally released in 1977. It's a severe collision of Western electric rock and Middle Eastern folk, akin to other vintage Turkish psych faves like Mogollar, 3 Hur-el and Erkin Koray, but particularly '70s-sounding in a polyester suit, shag carpet kind of way.
The very first track might throw you for a loop, but past that sappy, poppy number with its soft-rock strings and horns and tinkling piano, this record suddenly gets a whole lot rockier, heavier, and funkier. Imagine an Anatolian Pop score for some groovy car-chase flick... the schlocky, sizzling vintage '70s synths enhance the kitsch value and sound good amidst the traditional ethnic instrumentation (arranged by one of the Mogollar guys). Edip and the Dostlar dudes dish out the hard rock and funk with a groovy bottom end, plenty of psych guitar riffage, Edip's powerful vocals and wah-wah augmented Turkish saz. With proggy weirdness like flute attacks and studio tape speed manipulation, this is some badass 'exotica' for sure. Anyone addicted to the Turkish psych rock scene-sound from back in the hazy day like we are will find this a fine addition to their collection. Remastered, includes extensive new liner notes by Andrea Sawyer of Weirdo Records.
MPEG Stream: "Arabam Kaldi Yolda"
MPEG Stream: "Kolum Nerden Aldin Zinciri"

album cover AKBAYRAM, EDIP s/t (Pharaway Sound) cd 17.98
Vintage Turkish psychedelia, we love it! The love affair for us started years ago, when we got turned on via a compilation called Hava Narghile on Bacchus Archives. Hip '70s singer Edip Akbayram didn't appear on it, not sure why, but we've been fans of his music for a long time too thanks to some other reissue efforts, including a double cd anthology that Shadoks put out a while back. And as we've said before, Akbayram's music is some of heaviest and hardest-rockin' out of all the Turkish psych acts of the era, up there with Erkin Koray, blending Anatolian flower-power folk-rock with the polyester wah-wah funked-up sound of the '70s.
Now Pharaway Sounds has come out with a full reissue, on both cd and vinyl, of Akbayram's debut album, originally released on the Turkish Sayan label in 1974. It boasts a simple and colorfully '70s lookin' cover design, and features ten great tracks, all of 'em great, including quite a few of our absolute biggest Akbayram faves. Vibrant grooves, impassioned singing, tons o' fuzz, swingin' horns, just irresistible, classic stuff. We don't understand the words, but know the songs are about love and pain, with titles that in English translate to things like "The Mountains Made Me Sad", "Don't Touch My Sad Soul", and "Mother Cries About Me At The Head Of My Bed". Sounds like a bummer but it's not, the music has the opposite effect, powerful and jubilant.
So, if you don't already have that self-titled double disc Shadoks collection we mentioned (which contains all of the tracks from this record, as well as much of Edip's second album as well) then this is hugely recommended for sure. Presumably Pharaway Sounds will be reissuing more of his individual albums in the future too.
The liner notes by Angela Sawyer of Weirdo Records provide a full history of Akbayram's career (he still performs to this day, though his heyday was in the '70s) with details about his famous backing band Dostlar, and connections with other Anatolian artists like Mogollar and Baris Manco.
MPEG Stream: "Degmen Benim Gamli Yasli Gonlume"
MPEG Stream: "Deniz Ustu Kopurur"
MPEG Stream: "Yakar Inceden Inceden"

AKBAYRAM, EDIP s/t (Shadoks Music) 2cd 19.98
Glad tidings for Turkish psych freaks, or those soon to become Turkish psych freaks (just give this a listen!): here's a new must-have collection crammed full of swirling, fuzzed-out electric saz, impassioned vocals, and traditional Turkish folk gone funk! If you are indeed into the groovy East-meets-West psychedelia that flourished in Istanbul back in the '60s and '70s, artists like Mogollar, 3 Hur-el, Baris Manco, and Erkin Koray, chances are you may already be familiar with Edip Akbayram and his band Dostlar (formed in '73), as a while back we reviewed a compact disc reissue of Edip's circa '76 album Nedir Ne Decildir and gave it a hearty recommendation. This new Edip Akbayram double disc on the Shadoks label contains 24 tracks, including ten of the 14 cuts found on that previous reissue (meaning, if you already have that cd, you still will want this for the whole disc and then some of songs you don't have... and you can't get rid of the Nedir reissue either if you want those four songs that don't overlap). So this is definitely the Edip set to get at any rate.
The colorful music of Edip Akbayram and Dostlar is pretty much the hardest-rockin' all the Turkish psych acts of the era we've heard... darn heavy in spots. The Anatolian folk-rock of the sixties is blended with a polyester '70s wah-wah funked-up progginess here. It's vibrant and colorful music to make you feel like you're in some smoky, swinging nightclub on one of the warren of narrow, twisting side-streets off of the hip main drag Istiklal in the Beyoglu neighborhood of Istanbul, back in the day, sweating on the dance floor or sitting back, sucking on a hookah.
The cd booklet is full of cool photos, and a page of liner notes, giving Edip's bio but no info on the tracks themselves, we're just told that they're from his first two albums and singles. However, they do include English translations of the song titles, which should give some idea of Edip's seemingly dire outlook on life (or the outlook shared by his Turkish folk sources), with such songs as "Sorrow And More Sorrow", "Miserable", "In Vain", "Our Village Is Full Of Smoke", "Don't Touch My Sad Soul", "Tyrant", "Gallows Pole" and even "My Car Broke Down"! Sounds like a bummer, yet many of these tracks are amazingly upbeat musically!
Edip definitely belongs high up in the reissued ranks of all the incredible, obscure, groovy sixties/seventies psych sounds from all around the world that we can't get enough of here at AQ: Os Mutantes, San Ul Lim, Mogollar, Blo, Bango, Brincos, Krysztof Klenzon, Juan de la Cruz, Los Dug Dugs, He 6, the stuff on comps like Cherrystones Rocks, Welsh Rare Beat, Prog Is Not A Four Letter Word, Studio One Funk, etc. etc. etc.
MPEG Stream: "Deniz Ustu Kopurur"
MPEG Stream: "Yakar Inceden Inceden"
MPEG Stream: "Arabam Kaldi Yolda"

album cover AKBAYRAM, EDIP s/t (Pharaway Sound) lp 28.00
Vintage Turkish psychedelia, we love it! The love affair for us started years ago, when we got turned on via a compilation called Hava Narghile on Bacchus Archives. Hip '70s singer Edip Akbayram didn't appear on it, not sure why, but we've been fans of his music for a long time too thanks to some other reissue efforts, including a double cd anthology that Shadoks put out a while back. And as we've said before, Akbayram's music is some of heaviest and hardest-rockin' out of all the Turkish psych acts of the era, up there with Erkin Koray, blending Anatolian flower-power folk-rock with the polyester wah-wah funked-up sound of the '70s.
Now Pharaway Sounds has come out with a full reissue, on both cd and vinyl, of Akbayram's debut album, originally released on the Turkish Sayan label in 1974. It boasts a simple and colorfully '70s lookin' cover design, and features ten great tracks, all of 'em great, including quite a few of our absolute biggest Akbayram faves. Vibrant grooves, impassioned singing, tons o' fuzz, swingin' horns, just irresistible, classic stuff. We don't understand the words, but know the songs are about love and pain, with titles that in English translate to things like "The Mountains Made Me Sad", "Don't Touch My Sad Soul", and "Mother Cries About Me At The Head Of My Bed". Sounds like a bummer but it's not, the music has the opposite effect, powerful and jubilant.
So, if you don't already have that self-titled double disc Shadoks collection we mentioned (which contains all of the tracks from this record, as well as much of Edip's second album as well) then this is hugely recommended for sure. Presumably Pharaway Sounds will be reissuing more of his individual albums in the future too.
The liner notes by Angela Sawyer of Weirdo Records provide a full history of Akbayram's career (he still performs to this day, though his heyday was in the '70s) with details about his famous backing band Dostlar, and connections with other Anatolian artists like Mogollar and Baris Manco.
MPEG Stream: "Degmen Benim Gamli Yasli Gonlume"
MPEG Stream: "Deniz Ustu Kopurur"
MPEG Stream: "Yakar Inceden Inceden"

album cover ALHAJ, RAHIM When The Soul Is Settled: Music Of Iraq (Smithsonian Folkways) cd 16.98
We can always count on Smithsonian Folkways to bring us amazing reissues from decades past (Elizabeth Cotten, Roscoe Holcomb, Leadbelly, and of course countless compilations from all over the world). But it's always such a nice surprise when they release something that is actually contemporary. Such is the case with this outing by Rahim Alhaj. Born in Baghdad, Alhaj started playing and studying the oud when he was just 9 years old and began giving concerts as an early teen. A student of Muni Bashir (we hope you checked out his amazing album that we listed last year!), Alhaj is a master of the oud whose skills are undeniable. The record has a a kind of solemn strength that makes it the perfect thing to listen to when you want everything else in the world to fade away so just these sounds can surround and envelop you. Alhaj is able to conjure sounds from the oud that manage to be both lovely and arresting. With percussion accompaniment courtesy of Souhail Kaspar this record reminds us of the rich musical heritage of a land that is too often only thought of in terms of war and despair. So nice.
MPEG Stream: "Taqsim Maqam Sika"
MPEG Stream: "Taqsim Maqam Hijaz"

album cover AQUARIUS BUTTONS 2 x 1" buttons 1.00
Hey, we just got another batch of AQ buttons made up...
Spread the word! Show the world your true aQ colors! COOL COOL COOL aQ buttons, now in 6 different vibrant color combinations. 5 new color combos (blue on pink, red on dark grey, dark blue on blue, orange on black, and yellowish green on dark green) and a popular one we had previously (brown on yellow).
TWO FOR $1!!! Colors are random, but buy enough and you'll be guaranteed to get 'em all! And of course all feature our spiffy James Gang style logo!! So stylish!

album cover BASHIR, MUNIR Rhythms & Melodies (Le Chante Du Monde) cd 19.98

album cover BASHIR, MUNIR & THE IRAQI TRADITIONAL MUSIC GROUP s/t (Le Chant Du Monde) cd 17.98
What a totally beautiful and moving record! Muni Bashir founded the Iraqi Traditional Music Ensemble in 1981 as an aim to help preserve Arab & Iraqi musical heritage. His ensemble included around 40 musicians who would be sectioned off into groups of five, all playing the same instrument with Bashir leading the oud section. To call Bashir a master of the oud is not hyperbole...he is! This is one of those amazing examples of virtuosity, not for virtuosities sake, this amazing talent is mixed with so much soul and passion it takes the album out of the realms of just amazingly skillful performance into a space of transcendent beauty and bliss from start to finish. It should come as no surprise that there is a strong Persian influence on these traditional Iraqi sounds, and it's those sweeping melodies and intense rhythms that keep us mesmerized and listening with undivided attention. Highly recommended!
MPEG Stream: "Iraqi Traditional Music"
MPEG Stream: "Debke"
MPEG Stream: "Baghdadi cafŽ"

album cover BERBERIAN, JOHN Expressions East (Mainstream) lp 16.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
We're lucky to get in this week not one but two mid-sixties LPs showcasing the amazing virtuosity and global grooves of master oud player John Berberian. These are beautiful 180 gram reissues on colored vinyl from Mainstream records who have been reissuing a lot of their amazing back catalog as of late. When you see the covers of Expressions East and its follow up, Oud Artistry, you can't help but think of the late fifties / early sixties "Exotica" craze with paintings of belly dancers in a modernist style and use of oriental-looking fonts. Of course this is not going to be a Hamza El Din record, but the American-born Armenian Berberian is no Martin Denny either. On these records, Berberian beguiles us with his frenetically intense jazz-like compositions occasionally featuring the haunting vocals of Bob Tashjian. Featuring an amazing band playing traditional instruments (canun, bongos, dudoog, dumbeg, def, guitar, clarinet and finger cymbals along with an array of other exotic percussion) performing mesmerizingly rhythmic tracks of Turkish, Armenian and Arabic origins. Berberian became better known for more rockish Middle Eastern projects later on in his career, but it's these early records that really showcase his masterful skills as an instrumentalist and performer. Both records are well-recommended!

album cover BERBERIAN, JOHN Oud Artistry (Mainstream) lp 16.98
We're lucky to get in this week not one but two mid-sixties LPs showcasing the amazing virtuosity and global grooves of master oud player John Berberian. These are beautiful 180 gram reissues from Mainstream records who have been reissuing a lot of their amazing back catalog as of late. When you see the covers of Expressions East and its follow up, Oud Artistry, you can't help but think of the late fifties / early sixties "Exotica" craze with paintings of belly dancers in a modernist style and use of oriental-looking fonts. Of course this is not going to be a Hamza El Din record, but the American-born Armenian Berberian is no Martin Denny either. On these records, Berberian beguiles us with his frenetically intense jazz-like compositions occasionally featuring the haunting vocals of Bob Tashjian. Featuring an amazing band playing traditional instruments (canun, bongos, dudoog, dumbeg, def, guitar, clarinet and finger cymbals along with an array of other exotic percussion) performing mesmerizingly rhythmic tracks of Turkish, Armenian and Arabic origins. Berberian became better known for more rockish Middle Eastern projects later on in his career, but it's these early records that really showcase his masterful skills as an instrumentalist and performer. Both records are well-recommended!

album cover BISHOP, SIR RICHARD The Freak Of Araby (Drag City) cd 14.98
First off, nice pun Sir Richard, nice pun! With a title like The Freak Of Araby, do we really even need to review this? Well, probably not for SRB's legion of fans, who will already have an idea of what to expect here from this master of exotic, intricate guitar playing. For them, the prospect of a new solo album by SRB is automatically a pleasant one, and purchase should occur as automatically as one picks up the new releases on ethnic field recordings label Sublime Frequencies, run by Bishop's brother and fellow former Sun City Girl, Alan. Plus we've heard it, and recommended it too!
Inspired by the music of late Egyptian guitarist Omar Khorshid among others, here SRB presents ten tracks of instrumental improvisations (?) in a Middle Eastern mood. Delicate and detailed, sultry and sandy. Opener "Taqasim For Omar" is quite traditional-sounding, but elsewhere Bishop's electric guitar takes on almost a surfy twang, and thoughts of dusty Spaghetti Western soundtracks might enter ones mind whilst enjoying this record. Most of the tracks feature percussion and other supporting instrumentation, but the focus is certainly on Bishop's adept and evocative six string manipulation. By Sun City Girls standards, this is easy listening, and certainly lovely, reminiscent of some of the SCGs' most accessible stuff. However, echoey FX get laid on thick during track nine, "Sidi Mansour", in case you forgot the "Freak" part of this album's title, while the tenth and final number "Blood-Stained Sands" really shakes things up by abandoning guitar in favor much multilayered buzzing saz (we think it is), for a seven and a half minutes of dervishly whirling, droning delirium that ends the album leaving no doubt about SRB being The Freak Of Araby indeed.
MPEG Stream: "Barbary"
MPEG Stream: "The Pillars Of Baalbek"

BOMBINO Agamgam 2004 (Glitter Beat) lp 30.00
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.

album cover BORIS Heavy Metal Me (DIWPhalanx) dvd 32.00
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
It's indeed that time again. Where our customers act like crazy junkies who have FINALLY received their latest fix, which I guess they technically are. Although in this case the drug of choice is Japan's Boris, and the current fix is twofold, the just released full length Pink (reviewed elsewhere on this list) and this here DVD, the misleadingly titled Heavy Metal Me. Boris fans of all stripes will find stuff on here that is essential -- videos, a short film, and two live sets for those of you not lucky enough to see Boris on their recent tour.
First up is a video for the track "A Bao A Qu" from the soundtrack Mabuta No Ura, the perfect visual accompaniment to that track's ambient post rock drift, a sort of languid stroll around town, various band members walking down streets, sitting in parks, shots of skies and trees and shops warehouses and woods. Gorgeously tranquil. The next video is for another track from Mabuta No Ura, can't tell you the title cuz it's in Japanese, but it is an absolutely breathtaking series of abstact landscapes, that are perhaps either pieces of frayed and slowly undulating fabric, or maybe even internal organs, so alien looking and so beautiful.
The short film Heavy Metal Me is up next, a ten minute, super arty silent film with subtitles (in either Japanese or English), super blown out overexposed black and white and scratchy color Super8, very French New Wave, with quite a bit of sitting, and thinking, and walking and standing, lots of static shots and very obtuse subtitles. No sound, just occasionally the sound of no sound, a hissing distant white noise static. Quite beautiful actually!
Returning to the main, music side of Boris, you then get a live performance of "Feedbacker", the full 30 minutes, slow building and totally epic. With the stage drenched in rich colored lights, Wata stands illuminated, completely expressionless and immobile, a statue like guitar God! All the while the drummer and bass player work their way into a rock frenzy as the song reaches its superdistorted fuzz drenched climax.
The bonus track is a live performance of "Flood" in a tiny Japanese club, packed to the gills, with a ceiling just high enough for the band to stand on stage. Twenty minutes of creeping, drifting shimmering guitars and cymbal swells, before the sludge sets in, a monstrous pounding metallic crawl, with stoic guitarist Wata actually, for once, rocking out! Pretty amazing. And will definitely hit the spot for everyone who missed seeing Boris live last month.
As with everything Boris releases, beautifully designed and packaged. Even the menu and the credits look amazing, the credits especially with their dreamy ambient abstract Boris guitarscape accompaniment.

album cover BUFFALO Dead Forever (Aztec Music) cd 24.00
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
Some of the AQ shoppin' stoner rock contingent certainly know Buffalo, an honest to gosh band of Australian proto-metal pioneers from the early '70s. 'Specially since we JUST last list raved about the Aztec label's newfangled reissues (digipacks, remastered, bonus tracks) of two of their other more Monster Magnet than Monster Magnet ever wuz albums, Volcanic Rock ('73) and Want You For Your Body ('74). As promised then, we also got this, the Aztec reissue of their prematurely tired-of-living debut from 1972, which you're also gonna want! Dead Forever (nice title, they had a knack for that) was originally released on Vertigo, and at the time Buffalo were probably tipped as an Aussie version of Vertigo best sellers Black Sabbath. Close, no cigar, but what they're smoking has its charms anyhoo. This album's a graveyard of grinding dirgey yeah-yeah-yeah rockers, the kind that demand (as the back cover literally does) you to "play this LOUD". You've got to 'cause this band's lurching riffs and electric psychedelic blues bashings need all the help they can get since producers back then didn't yet know exactly what real metal required (though this remastered edition is sounding heavier than the one we'd heard before). True, this has a few quiet, balladic numbers on it (not bad ones either) but will be 'specially valued for trudging lead-foot boogie blooze proto-DOOM like you get with the album-closing title track coffin-nail-hammerer, or their cover of Free's "I'm A Mover". For folks who also dig the similarly lost and wasted, stoned guitars and wailing vocals of such acts as Captain Beyond, Randy Holden, Juan de la Cruz, Toad, Leafhound, and Sir Lord Baltimore.
This reish has five bonus tracks, two from pre-Buffalo band Head's 1971 7" single, and three other non-album singles tracks from Buffalo circa '72, including a cover of Chuck Berry's "No Particular Place To Go".
MPEG Stream: "Leader"
MPEG Stream: "Pay My Dues"

album cover BULENT Benumle Oynar Misin (World Psychedelic ) cd 29.00
Andee thinks this sounds like Cat Stevens...but that doesn't mean it's not lovely! Benumle Oynar Misin is a rare album from the early '70s by Turkish singer/songwriter Bulent Ortacgil, now available on cd. Recorded circa '73-'74, this is certainly a bit different from the other "Turkish Delights" we've been bringing you lately (Mogollar, Erkin Koray, 3 Hur-el, etc.) as you'll find no fuzzed-out guitars dueling with ouds and ikligs here. No, Bulent is all about mellow, melodic, placid, folk-rock with some bright and shiny horns livening up the proceedings on occasion. It's all sung in Turkish, but the songs should hold up even without any understanding of the lyrics. So nice. It has such a sensitive vibe that it may even appeal to fans of Belle & Sebastian.
MPEG Stream: "Kediler"
MPEG Stream: "Olmali Mi Olmamali Mi"
MPEG Stream: "Sik Latife"

album cover BUNALIM s/t (Shadoks Music) cd 15.98
Oh yeah. '70s Turkish FUZZ rock in effect here, big time!! Knowing how much AQ customers LOVE the psychedelic Turkish tunes of decades past, this is a no-brainer. Buy it. Now. That is, if you like Edip Akbayram and Erkin Koray and all the others we've gone gaga over as the stack of such reissues gradually grows... These guys actually have membership links to all sorts of Istanbul rock stars, from Koray to Mogollar to Cem Karaca (whose early band Kardaslar we'd love to get a reissue of...). They were a pretty important band in the scene, on an underground level anyway.
The name Bunalim apparently means either Depression or Frustration in Turkish, fitting for a band hailing from a city, Istanbul, who defining mood is melancholy (according to Nobel Prize winning novelist Orhan Pamuk). You can hear both the energy of frustration and the sadness of depression in their music, which consists of blistering, Iron-Butterfly-heavy hard rockers mixed up with the style of traditional Anatolian folk dances and songs. Ballsy bombast and beautiful balladry both. And we're not kidding about Iron Butterfly -- one of the tracks here is a Turkish language cover of "Get Out Of My Life, Woman", a song (originally by Allen Toussaint, actually) that appeared on Iron Butterfly's first album, Heavy. Definitely it's the IB version that inspired Bunalim's rendition! Why so much "Bunalim" with these guys? Well it wasn't easy being a long-haired, underground rocker in that conservative society in those days! Plus even in the West there was much to make the youth feel worried and oppressed.
This disc collects their rare singles tracks (they never made an album) from 1970-'72, and captures them at their most raw and garagey, loud guitar rockin'. They definitely showcase a distinct, kick-ass Middle Eastern take on the acid rock sound of the day, and really what could sound better than that??
This cd reissue includes well-informed liner notes and lots of cool vintage photos in the cd booklet. Shadoks, keep 'em coming!
MPEG Stream: "Basak Saclim"
MPEG Stream: "Tas Var Kopek Yok"
MPEG Stream: "Bir Dunya da Bana Ver"

album cover BUNALIM s/t (Pharaway Sounds) lp 26.00
Now released in a vinyl version too, here's what we said previously when this Turkish fuzz fave was only on cd via Shadoks some years ago:
Oh yeah. '70s Turkish FUZZ rock in effect here, big time!! Knowing how much AQ customers LOVE the psychedelic Turkish tunes of decades past, this is a no-brainer. Buy it. Now. That is, if you like Edip Akbayram and Erkin Koray and all the others we've gone gaga over as the stack of such reissues gradually grows... These guys actually have membership links to all sorts of Istanbul rock stars, from Koray to Mogollar to Cem Karaca. They were a pretty important band in the scene, on an underground level anyway.
The name Bunalim apparently means either Depression or Frustration in Turkish, fitting for a band hailing from a city, Istanbul, who defining mood is melancholy (according to Nobel Prize winning novelist Orhan Pamuk). You can hear both the energy of frustration and the sadness of depression in their music, which consists of blistering, Iron-Butterfly-heavy hard rockers mixed up with the style of traditional Anatolian folk dances and songs. Ballsy bombast and beautiful balladry both. And we're not kidding about Iron Butterfly - one of the tracks here is a Turkish language cover of "Get Out Of My Life, Woman", a song (originally by Allen Toussaint, actually) that appeared on Iron Butterfly's first album, Heavy. Definitely it's the IB version that inspired Bunalim's rendition! Why so much "Bunalim" with these guys? Well it wasn't easy being a long-haired, underground rocker in that conservative society in those days! Plus even in the West there was much to make the youth feel worried and oppressed.
This lp collects their complete recordings, rare singles tracks (they never made an actual album) circa 1970-'72, and captures them at their most raw and garagey, loud guitar rockin'. They definitely showcase a distinct, kick-ass Middle Eastern take on the acid rock sound of the day, and really what could sound better than that??
Includes insert with liner notes.
MPEG Stream: "Basak Saclim"
MPEG Stream: "Tas Var Kopek Yok"
MPEG Stream: "Bir Dunya da Bana Ver"

album cover CHITHRA, K.S. s/t (B-Music / Finders Keepers) cd 16.98
B-Music/Finders Keepers strikes again, with another crazy, kitschy, catchy collection of South Indian movie music! This is the follow-up to their delightful Solla Solla anthology of the 1977-1983 output of "The Maestro" Ilaiyaraaja, a top composer for the Tamil-language film industry based in "Kollywood". On this album, popular singer K.S. Chithra (aka Chinna Kuyil, or "Little Nightingale") is teamed up with The Maestro, her sweet vocals accompanied by an entertaining, unrestrained array of sounds - lush orchestration, groovy rhythms, and digital sampling. That's right, on these recordings, dating from between 1986 and 1991, Ilaiyaraaja made full use of the latest available technology (sounding awesomely '80s vintage-retro to us now), so there's drum machine beats and electronic synth bleeps alongside more traditional Indian instrumentation of flutes and tablas...
Wonderful stuff, as any fan of Bollywood/Kollywood/Lollywood music should expect. Utterly charming. Chithra and Ilaiyaraaja's "plugged-in pop" is impossible not to like. Add this to your shelf alongside Solla Solla and long time fave, Vijaya Anand's Dance Raja Dance. And this being a Finders Keepers release, there's copious liner notes and compelling colorful graphics included, these folks know their stuff.
MPEG Stream: "Yaaro Sonnaangalaam"
MPEG Stream: "Oh My Love"
MPEG Stream: "Sikkunnu"
MPEG Stream: "Nethu Oruthara"

album cover CHITHRA, K.S. s/t (B-Music / Finders Keepers) 2lp 27.00
B-Music/Finders Keepers strikes again, with another crazy, kitschy, catchy collection of South Indian movie music! This is the follow-up to their delightful Solla Solla anthology of the 1977-1983 output of "The Maestro" Ilaiyaraaja, a top composer for the Tamil-language film industry based in "Kollywood". On this album, popular singer K.S. Chithra (aka Chinna Kuyil, or "Little Nightingale") is teamed up with The Maestro, her sweet vocals accompanied by an entertaining, unrestrained array of sounds - lush orchestration, groovy rhythms, and digital sampling. That's right, on these recordings, dating from between 1986 and 1991, Ilaiyaraaja made full use of the latest available technology (sounding awesomely '80s vintage-retro to us now), so there's drum machine beats and electronic synth bleeps alongside more traditional Indian instrumentation of flutes and tablas...
Wonderful stuff, as any fan of Bollywood/Kollywood/Lollywood music should expect. Utterly charming. Chithra and Ilaiyaraaja's "plugged-in pop" is impossible not to like. Add this to your shelf alongside Solla Solla and long time fave, Vijaya Anand's Dance Raja Dance. And this being a Finders Keepers release, there's copious liner notes and compelling colorful graphics included, these folks know their stuff.
MPEG Stream: "Yaaro Sonnaangalaam"
MPEG Stream: "Oh My Love"
MPEG Stream: "Sikkunnu"
MPEG Stream: "Nethu Oruthara"

album cover CHURCHILL'S s/t (Axis) cd 17.98
Here's an old AQ fave, happily back in print on cd! Psychedelic rock from Israel, circa 1968, the original lp a rare collectible, and a classic. With Middle Eastern touches, backwards FX, lovely melodies, and twanging guitar solos, Churchill's should appeal to all fans of international sixties psych. Influenced by the Beatles and other British rock groups of the era (in fact, Churchill's later on became very Led Zep-ish, and covered "Living Loving" on a 7" single!), the Churchill's debut was apparently recorded as the soundtrack music for a pair of obscure films entitled A Woman's Case and The Dress. But the album is definitely a collection of songs, not instrumental/incidental music. And great songs they are. Some soft and mellow ("When You're Gone"), others weird and wigged out ("Straight People"). No doubt drugs were involved. One of the best tracks is the melodic, mandolin-fueled "Subsequent Final", an East-meets-West stunner indeed, pretty much worth buying this disc for just by itself, though you get lots more treats besides, in fact, this new reish includes TEN bonus tracks, unlisted for some reason, but we think they're songs from various non-album singles, as they do include their version of "Living Loving".
MPEG Stream: "Open Up Your Eyes"
MPEG Stream: "Subsequent Final"
MPEG Stream: "So Alone Today"

album cover DERDIYOKLAR IKILISI Coban Mamos (Pharaway Sounds) cd 17.98
If album covers have as much of an impact on sales as they're supposed to have, then it's hard to understand why this reissue isn't already at the top of the charts. Two happy, heavily bearded fellows proudly displaying the triple necked guitar-thing that they built themselves, emblazoned with their band name (the liner notes explain that they were trying to outdo fellow Turkish psych purveyors 3 Hur-El, who had a doubleneck). The previous reissue that we had by these guys had a similar cover concept, so it probably worked for them pretty well back then. That album was called Disko Folk (which is the subtitle here too by the way) and to them that meant traditional Turkish folk music done with modern electric instruments, the duo being wedding dance music specialists who catered to the immigrant market in West Germany. They released this lp (or maybe it was originally a cassette?) in 1985, so while some years removed from the heyday of Turkish psych it's still a kind of trippy example of Anadolu Pop on account of the blend of folk music and '80s technology - there's some thumping electronic drum beats alongside the more conventional trap kit percussion, and the track "Dom Dom Kursunu", for one, is interspersed with occasional blats of synthesizer zap.
Being a duo, they resort to overdubs on record, bringing in additional, emotive vocals - and even sound FX of bleating sheep! That triple necked guitar gets a workout, and the results on this record are somehow both stately and sprightly. Live, they had to do it all themselves of course, and apparently put it across with a lot of crazy showmanship (for example, see this YouTube clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-yBQhBa5RZk, featuring fancy footwork, behind the back guitar playing, nose-to-keyboard soloing, and more), enough to get large groups of people on their feet and dancing.
From the master tapes, and the vinyl version is a 180 gram pressing.
MPEG Stream: "Coban Mamos"
MPEG Stream: "Baris Icinde"
MPEG Stream: "Dom Dom Kursunu"

album cover DERDIYOKLAR IKILISI Coban Mamos (Pharaway Sounds) lp 28.00
If album covers have as much of an impact on sales as they're supposed to have, then it's hard to understand why this reissue isn't already at the top of the charts. Two happy, heavily bearded fellows proudly displaying the triple necked guitar-thing that they built themselves, emblazoned with their band name (the liner notes explain that they were trying to outdo fellow Turkish psych purveyors 3 Hur-El, who had a doubleneck). The previous reissue that we had by these guys had a similar cover concept, so it probably worked for them pretty well back then. That album was called Disko Folk (which is the subtitle here too by the way) and to them that meant traditional Turkish folk music done with modern electric instruments, the duo being wedding dance music specialists who catered to the immigrant market in West Germany. They released this lp (or maybe it was originally a cassette?) in 1985, so while some years removed from the heyday of Turkish psych it's still a kind of trippy example of Anadolu Pop on account of the blend of folk music and '80s technology - there's some thumping electronic drum beats alongside the more conventional trap kit percussion, and the track "Dom Dom Kursunu", for one, is interspersed with occasional blats of synthesizer zap.
Being a duo, they resort to overdubs on record, bringing in additional, emotive vocals - and even sound FX of bleating sheep! That triple necked guitar gets a workout, and the results on this record are somehow both stately and sprightly. Live, they had to do it all themselves of course, and apparently put it across with a lot of crazy showmanship (for example, see this YouTube clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-yBQhBa5RZk, featuring fancy footwork, behind the back guitar playing, nose-to-keyboard soloing, and more), enough to get large groups of people on their feet and dancing.
From the master tapes, and the vinyl version is a 180 gram pressing.
MPEG Stream: "Coban Mamos"
MPEG Stream: "Baris Icinde"
MPEG Stream: "Dom Dom Kursunu"

album cover DERDIYOKLAR IKILISI Disko Folk (Guerssen) cd 17.98
Too bad we hadn't reviewed this reissue before we did our "beard" themed in-between list a few weeks back, 'cause just check out the two dudes sitting crosslegged on the cover! Awesome beards (and long hair). Would have fit in on that beard list perfectly. However, if we ever do a rad '70s Middle Eastern psych-folk-rock themed list, we'll at least be able to include Derdiyoklar Ikilisi on that, for sure.
Derdiyoklar Ikilisi were a "Anadolu Pop" duo based in Germany, who played their hip-swaying music for the festivities at weddings and circumcision feasts (yikes) held by the large Turkish immigrant community there. This record of theirs dates from 1979, but the title of Disko Folk doesn't mean that it's a actually a "disco" album (though that would be cool too, Turkish disco, Mogollar meets Moroder?). No, Disko Folk is meant more generally to indicate the presence of electric, Western instruments, and/or of the ornate Turkish folk motifs used in a pop music context. They really sound a lot like old AQ faves Mogollar, one of our favorites from the Istanbul psych scene back in the early '70s, but with more swirling, sweeping synthesizer! 3 Hur-el is another close comparison. Which means, this is pretty darn cool. Get this, and it's electro-saz fueled dance party time, the wedding or circumcision is optional! There's also mellower but equally impassioned numbers here (including a gorgeously dark and drifty one called "Eminem") that would be better suited for slow dancing. Lyrically, apparently these are protest songs, about issues of concern to the immigrant Turkish population in Germany.
And actually it's not the hairstyles on the cover that amaze us the most, it's the crazy 3-necked string instrument emblazoned with their band name that they're both holding between them like some totem. What is that thing? We guess with just two guys in the band, that's a pretty useful instrument to have.
The vinyl and compact disc editions are both limited to 500 copies each. The cd booklet contains liner notes, lp version comes with insert too.
MPEG Stream: "Fethiyem"
MPEG Stream: "Yadoy"
MPEG Stream: "Sofor Gardas"

album cover DERDIYOKLAR IKILISI Disko Folk (Guerssen) lp 26.00
Too bad we hadn't reviewed this reissue before we did our "beard" themed in-between list a few weeks back, 'cause just check out the two dudes sitting crosslegged on the cover! Awesome beards (and long hair). Would have fit in on that beard list perfectly. However, if we ever do a rad '70s Middle Eastern psych-folk-rock themed list, we'll at least be able to include Derdiyoklar Ikilisi on that, for sure.
Derdiyoklar Ikilisi were a "Anadolu Pop" duo based in Germany, who played their hip-swaying music for the festivities at weddings and circumcision feasts (yikes) held by the large Turkish immigrant community there. This record of theirs dates from 1979, but the title of Disko Folk doesn't mean that it's a actually a "disco" album (though that would be cool too, Turkish disco, Mogollar meets Moroder?). No, Disko Folk is meant more generally to indicate the presence of electric, Western instruments, and/or of the ornate Turkish folk motifs used in a pop music context. They really sound a lot like old AQ faves Mogollar, one of our favorites from the Istanbul psych scene back in the early '70s, but with more swirling, sweeping synthesizer! 3 Hur-el is another close comparison. Which means, this is pretty darn cool. Get this, and it's electro-saz fueled dance party time, the wedding or circumcision is optional! There's also mellower but equally impassioned numbers here (including a gorgeously dark and drifty one called "Eminem") that would be better suited for slow dancing. Lyrically, apparently these are protest songs, about issues of concern to the immigrant Turkish population in Germany.
And actually it's not the hairstyles on the cover that amaze us the most, it's the crazy 3-necked string instrument emblazoned with their band name that they're both holding between them like some totem. What is that thing? We guess with just two guys in the band, that's a pretty useful instrument to have.
The vinyl and compact disc editions are both limited to 500 copies each. The cd booklet contains liner notes, lp version comes with insert too.
MPEG Stream: "Fethiyem"
MPEG Stream: "Yadoy"
MPEG Stream: "Sofor Gardas"

album cover DEVIL'S ANVIL, THE Hard Rock From The Middle East (Rev-Ola) cd 16.98
We LOVE this album, and have for a long time. We first reviewed a reissue of this "exotic" 1967 garage-fuzz gem back in 2001, in fact making it a Record Of The Week. That reissue was a somewhat odd 2-fer-1 deal that included an album by another, pretty much utterly unrelated '60s psych band, The Freak Scene, kinda cool but not Middle Eastern styled like The Devil's Anvil. And it was The Devil's Anvil that was the real treasure on that disc, as far as we were concerned. If you haven't heard it yet, you're in luck, 'cause it's just been reissued again, getting a disc all to itself this time, courtesy of vintage rock specialists Rev-Ola, who do their usual nice job with the packaging and all.
The cover art shows the band hangin' in the desert in front of the pyramids of Egypt - but don't be fooled, they were actually mostly Arab-AMERICANS, based in New York City. Still, their rock n' roll was as authentically "Middle Eastern" as their Turkish contemporaries. They could have held their own with the likes of Erkin Koray and Mogollar.
The Devil's Anvil got together in the happenin' mid sixties Greenwich Village scene, playing their Middle Eastern influenced music at folk cafes and rock clubs. Eventually they hooked up with classical musician-turned-rocker Felix Pappalardi (producer of Cream's Disraeli Gears, later to play alongside Leslie West in Mountain). He began playing bass with the band and eventually scored the group a record deal. The resulting album was truly one-of-a-kind and would certainly made greater impact had it not been released on the very eve of the Arab-Israeli war in 1967. Thus, we're told no New York radio stations would play it and unfortunately the album has remained an expensive collector's find until its cd reissue.
The rock contained herein is absolutely kick ass, with bluesy and impassioned Arabic vocals, electric (or at least amplified) oud, bouzouki, tamboura, durbeki as well as the usual rock suspects of (fuzz!) guitar, bass and drums. The majority of the tracks here are either rock arrangements of traditional Middle Eastern and Greek numbers or original compositions, but a couple are actually straight traditional numbers with no western instruments at all. Plus there's an excellent Middle Eastern-esque rock arangement of surf classic "Misirlou" (of course, a song with its roots originally in Greek rembetika) that's perhaps the best version ever recorded, in our humble opinion. And the record ends with a Devil's Anvil original that kinda reminds us of one of the Beatles' more Eastern-influenced tunes. This is about as good as it gets. Very, very highly recommended! Nay, ESSENTIAL.
The cd booklet of this new reish includes original album graphics along with brand new liner notes from one of the writers at Shindig magazine, and a blurb on the back that just might have been parapharased from -our- Record Of The Week review of this album.
MPEG Stream: "Wala Dai"
MPEG Stream: "Shisheler"
MPEG Stream: "Hala Laya"
MPEG Stream: "Basaha"

album cover DR. DELAY Rajaz Meter (Funk Weapons) cd-r 15.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
Dr. D is a New York DJ best known to us for mashing up obscure '60 psych with current, crunken hiphop hitz. This limited edition cd-r mix, however, is pretty much all '60s and '70s grooves as far as we know -- no hiphop anyway. And it's got our number, 'cause so much of what he's spinning is that Turkish psych stuff we love, mixed in with some old and new Afrofunk a la Ethiopiques and Tinariwen, along with some further exotic flavors that fit. Some names we know/tracks we recognize: Selda, Bunalim, Edip Akbayram, Les Mogol, Erkin Koray, Baris Manco... and of course there's a bunch more we don't, all of it pretty cool though. It's a bit like that Trap Door mix, in a romantic mood. Plus this is a true turntablist mix, featuring 31 short selections (mostly 1-2 minute edits), flowing quite nicely, occasionally enhanced with some scratchy-scratch whip-whip-whap. The discs we have are from the first numbered 250 copy edition, in screenprinted cardboard sleeves.
MPEG Stream: BEYBONLAR "Nenni"
MPEG Stream: VINGUEN "Crazy Heart"

album cover EBTEKAR, ATA Dear Iran, Miniature Engines Throb In Time For Your Beating Heart (Merzbild) cd 15.98
It's been a while since we've heard from Ata Ebtekar, an Iranian sound artist and electronic composer born in Germany, who previously recorded for Warp under the name Sote, creating a clutch of killer records that were furious and fractured, beat heavy concoctions that found him fusing rave and drone and jungle into something much more dense and confusional. And dense and confusional is definitely a good way to describe the music he makes under his own name, a 'world music' of his own invention, but unlike the collaborative record he released with the Iranian Orchestra For New Music, released on local label Isounderscore, on which he took recordings and manipulated them, other than some prepared traditional instruments, Dear Iran is a wholly original work, of vast sonic scope. We read up on Ebtekar, and could have just paraphrased the dense academic description of his work, and this record, but odds are most folks just want to know what it sounds like, and Dear Iran is incredible, dense and dizzying, at times almost overwhelming, layer upon layer of textures and mutated percussion. There are no 'beats' to be found here, this is definitely not a beat record, but it is rhythmic, it just so happens that the rhythms are often implied, gnarled tangles of cascading tones, of garbled processed crunch, fractured melodies, and gristled fields of blurred glitch, it's actually quite difficult to describe, as it really does sound unlike most of what you've heard. Some tracks are almost cinematic, sweeping sheets of buzz and squelch, bits of clang and clatter seem to be pulled apart at the molecular level, and recast as flurries of splatter and skitter, which is then sculpted into almost melodic shapes, bell like tones surface throughout, lending the record most of its melodic heft, but those tones are often all twisted up, smeared into hazy chordal streaks, or laid atop one another creating strange pulsing harmonies, or alternately, lush minimal stretches of hushed bleep and bloop, all wreathed in clouds of electro static thrum. The rhythmic component surfaces throughout as well, but not in any way you might expect, a burst of tangled melodic squiggles, will suddenly coalesce and transform into a lurching stutter step pulse, before dissolving into a fog of pixelated prismatic flutter, or a seemingly freeform assemblage of rumble and whir, will gradually take the shape of mysterious propulsive soft noise streaks, before once again, splintering into a field of strange digital crunches and shimmery, or fractured swirls of darkly droney, woozy electro-minimal psychedelia. Gorgeous stuff for sure, as equally suited to academic deep listening, as pure sound, audial overload sonic bliss out. WAY recommended.
MPEG Stream: "Bang O Bargh"
MPEG Stream: "Lilac Nilak"

album cover EBTEKAR, ATA & THE IRANIAN ORCHESTRA FOR NEW MUSIC Ornamental (Isounderscore) 2lp 24.00
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
We first heard from Ata Abtekar under his pseudonym Sote, with a flurry of releases for Warp, then Dielectric, and a sound that definitely hit the spot, a deft amalgamation of fractured jungle, old school rave music, downtempo beatscapes, and shimmery dronemusic. More recently he helped compile a double disc compilation called Persian Electronic Music: Yesterday And Today (1966-2006), still to be reviewed, which collected the work of legendary Iranian new music composer Alireza Mashayekhi on one disc, and Ebtekar's more modern compositions on the other, drawing a sort of sonic timeline between Persian new music past and present, which leads directly to this double lp.
A long in the works 'collaboration' between Ebtekar and Mashayekhi. For these extended sonic explorations, Ebtekar took pieces composed by Mashayekhi, and performed by the Iranian Orchestra For New Music, and then applied various techniques to the sounds, taking live recordings, studio tracks, and then processing them, rearranging them, adding effects and samples, synthesizers, adding original sounds, harmonies and melodies, for a unique sort of modern classical Persian musiq concrete.
The original sounds are definitely present, this is most certainly not a case of the sample being rendered unrecognizable, those original sounds are as important to these pieces as anything Ebtekar had to add. Flurries of piano, moaning cellos, pizzicato plucks, soaring strings, subtle percussion, all surface here and there, and often, they are wreathed in fuzzy drones, or chopped into strangely percussive loops, or jumbled up into something much more chaotic, but just as often, Ebtekar's machinations are much more subtle, playing along as if he were not a remixer per se, but another player in the orchestra, only armed with a computer and effects instead of a flute or violin.
The sounds are varied and wondrous, from fantastical flurries of wild freaked out electronic flecked free form soft noise, to delicate tinklings and hushed moonlit drift, spacey metallic shimmers to haunting alien music box like lullabyes, Eastern sounding folk fragments drifting in soft swirls of rumble and hiss, long stretches of barely there melody and wispy streaks of distant rumble. Really quite mysterious and beautiful, whether you're into modern classical, electronic music, abstract dronemusic, or all of the above. ESPECIALLY all of the above.
Beautiful screened sleeves, with a printed insert, detailing the project, as well as the various performers and composers.

album cover EBTEKAR, ATA AND THE IRANIAN ORCHESTRA FOR NEW MUSIC Performing Works Of Alireza Mashayekhi (Sub Rosa) cd 16.98

album cover EDIP AKBAYRAM & DOSTLAR Nedir Ne Decildir? (World Psychedelia Ltd.) cd 17.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
Here's another one to add to the list of stellar '60s/'70s Turkish psych-rock reissues, along with Erkin Koray, 3 Hur-el, and Mogollar! From '75 or '76, Edip Akbayram & Dostlar are very '70s indeed...it's much more of a severe collision between the trad. folk tunes and the Western electric rock than some of those groups. The very first track might throw you for a loop, but past that sappy, poppy number with its soft-rock strings and horns and tinkling piano, this record suddenly gets a whole lot rockier, heavier, and funkier. Imagine an Anatolian Pop score for some groovy car-chase flick...the schlocky, sizzling vintage '70s synths enhance the kitsch value and sound good amidst the traditional ethnic instrumention (arranged by one of the Mogollar guys). Edip and Dostlar dish out the hard rock and funk with a groovy bottom end, psych guitar riffage, Edip's powerful vocals and wah-wah augmented Turkish saz. With proggy weirdness like flute attacks and studio tape speed manipulation, this is some bad-ass 'exotica' for sure. Anyone addicted to the Middle Eastern psych rock scene-sound from back in the hazy day like we are will find this a fine addition to their collection. Includes 4 bonus tracks quite like the album cuts. Real cool.
MPEG Stream: "Arabam Kaldi Yolda"
MPEG Stream: "Kolum Nerden Aldin Zinciri"

ELAHI, OSTAD Cascade (Le Chant Du Monde) cd 16.98

album cover ELAHI, OSTAD Destinations (Harmonia Mundi) cd 26.00

ELAHI, OSTAD Oraison Mystique (Le Chant Du Monde) cd 17.98

ELAHI, OSTAD The Celestial Music of... (Le Chant Du Monde) cd 16.98

album cover ELAHI, OSTAD Une Epopee Spirituelle (Le Chant Du Monde) cd 17.98

album cover ESPLENDOR GEOMETRICO Sheikh Aljama (Geometrik) lp 21.00
First time available on vinyl, Sheik Aljama has long been heralded as one of the finer albums from the long-running Spanish industrial project Esplendor Geometrico. The recordings here began as early as 1986, but the album didn't see completion until 1991. Sheikh Alkama is laced with Arabic samples, percussion, and radio broadcasts, and given the entire catalogue from Muslimgauze who genetically fused Arabic modalities within an industrial agenda, Shiekh Aljama will now and forever be compared to Muslimgauze. There's plenty to separate Shiekh Aljama from Muslimgauze though, but context is key to understanding this album. Cabaret Voltaire may have been the earliest to use Arabic samples within a bleak form of proto-electronica; and these eerie dislocations of Arabic sounds from "the other" came as an anti-colonial diatribe against what the philosopher Edward Said described as Orientalism. Both Muslimgauze and Esplendor Geometrico took those ideas much further than Cabaret Voltaire's appetite for sensuality. For Muslimgauze, the noise and Arabic rhythms were in response to very specific contemporary political events taking place in the Middle East; but for Esplendor Geometrico, the album cites the fall of the Republic of Cordoba in the 11th Century with Arabic and Islamic culture being driven out of the Iberian peninsula. Esplendor Geometrico's mesmerizing rhythms sizzle with corrosive noise and metal-bashed clamor; and the sampled chants seem positioned more as subliminals than as overt citations. "Medinati" looks back to EG's pioneering industrial work in the early '80s, more in keeping with the direct-action pummel of Test Dept; but immediately following this is the disorienting yet hypnotizing dervish of "Descontrol" with its spasmodic dromedary rhythms and shrouded megaphone barking. Like Muslimgauze, Esplendor Geometrico builds a didactic framework and allows the aesthetics of their rhythm and noise to flourish within. It's a great album to have back in print; and very strange to think this has never been on vinyl until now.
MPEG Stream: "Baraca"
MPEG Stream: "Descontrol"
MPEG Stream: "Medinati"

album cover GOLDEN RING, THE Iranian Styled 60's Garage & Other Exotic Sounds (Persianna) cd 25.00
We first heard the Golden Ring on the amazing compilation Raks Raks Raks: 17 Golden Garage Psych Nuggets From The Iranian 60's Scene, and we knew we had to hear more, and just like that, a collection of 7"s and assorted tracks from the band that was one of the first and most important Iranian garage bands, mixing traditional Iranian music and instrumentation with Western pop of the time, like the Beatles, the results were mindblowing, totally ahead of their time, even know these songs sound incredible, catchy and groovy, but also totally psychedelic and mysterious.
The band never recorded a proper album, which makes this collection all the more amazing, every track here rules, it's a wonder this wasn't reissued ages ago. This is head and shoulders above much of the stuff that gets touted as lost classics.
The collection begins with "Tulip" that sounds like it could have been a Joe Meek production, in fact much of this record had us thinking it could have been a made up band masterminded by Meek, it's that far out, and that brilliant. "Tulip" adds swirling organ to twangy surf guitars, definitely offering a nod, intentional or otherwise to the Telstars, but it's track two where things get really good.
"Beauty" begins with tinkling melodies, and Bollywood like vocals, the sound swirling and definitely psychedelic, very dynamic and groovy, but them in come soaring operatic female vocals, and did we mention the stop start breakdown complete with whistling, so good, so totally classic, but at the same time, so unlike any of the other vintage garage rock we've heard.
And so it goes, much of the record is definitely very Middle Eastern sounding, almost like Iranian folk music given a garage makeover, the Beatles influence is definitely all over the place, as is plenty of whistling, and more of that swirly organ, the production is fantastic, lush, but definitely experimental, there's harmonica, giving those tracks a twangy Morricone vibe, there are dizzying organ driven rockers, the sound murky and washed out, the melodies tangled and weirdly atonal, there are some parts that sound very Bollywood, others just sound totally far out.
"Sun Full Moon" is a favorite, the whole song warped and warbly, guitars bending and swerving, the harmonicas practically melting, it sounds like the pitch is constantly shifting, like a mistake in mastering, but the result is super tripped out and amazing. This whole collection is just fantastic, hard to work on the list cuz this is pretty much all we want to listen to. Totally recommended.
MPEG Stream: "Tulip"
MPEG Stream: "Beauty"
MPEG Stream: "Dancing Beauties"
MPEG Stream: "Heads Or Tails"

album cover GOOGOOSH s/t (B-Music / Finders Keepers) cd 16.98
Oh Googoosh! We were pretty thrilled when this came in as we've been anticipating a collection of her recordings ever since many of us first heard her mind blowing track "Talagh" on that great Pomegranates compilation of Persian pop, psych, and funk from the '60s and '70s. Luckily, Iranian singer Googoosh was no one hit wonder, as this collection shows that pretty much every song she made during this era (1970-'75) is totally awe-inspiring. Like the perfect cross between the explosive psychedelia of Selda and the introspective folk of Pari Zangeneh. Her voice reels you in and the music's alluring and dynamic swirling melodies leave you in the throes of serious sonic pleasure.
Much like Turkey's Selda, Googoosh's music had such a brave and fiery political stance to it as well. Sadly much of her music was banned by the Iranian government by the end of the 1970s, and many of her records were literally burned and destroyed. Luckily, from what copies did remain, Andy Votel worked his Finders Keepers magic and has compiled an amazing collection of one of the greatest voices to come out of Iran (and anywhere else for that matter)!
MPEG Stream: "Shekayat"
MPEG Stream: "Pishkesh"
MPEG Stream: "Mano Tou"

album cover GOOGOOSH s/t (Finders Keepers) lp 25.00
Finally available on vinyl!!!!!! Here is what we said about the cd version:
Oh Googoosh! We were pretty thrilled when this came in as we've been anticipating a collection of her recordings ever since many of us first heard her mind blowing track "Talagh" on that great Pomegranates compilation of Persian pop, psych, and funk from the '60s and '70s. Luckily, Iranian singer Googoosh was no one hit wonder, as this collection shows that pretty much every song she made during this era (1970-'75) is totally awe-inspiring. Like the perfect cross between the explosive psychedelia of Selda and the introspective folk of Pari Zangeneh. Her voice reels you in and the music's alluring and dynamic swirling melodies leave you in the throes of serious sonic pleasure.
Much like Turkey's Selda, Googoosh's music had such a brave and fiery political stance to it as well. Sadly much of her music was banned by the Iranian government by the end of the 1970s, and many of her records were literally burned and destroyed. Luckily, from what copies did remain, Andy Votel worked his Finders Keepers magic and has compiled an amazing collection of one of the greatest voices to come out of Iran (and anywhere else for that matter)!
MPEG Stream: "Shekayat"
MPEG Stream: "Pishkesh"
MPEG Stream: "Mano Tou"

album cover HARDAL Nasil? Ne Zaman (Shadoks Music) cd 17.98
What do you think, is it about time for another Turkish psych sensation 'round these parts? Hardal fits right in with Shadoks' previous reissues of Istanbul-based "Anatolian rock" bands we've loved, like Bunalim and Edip Akbayram, even though the date on this is a bit later than those. Hardal (featuring members of Erkin Koray's Underground 4 band) formed in 1976, releasing this, their debut album, in 1980. Maybe a little disco has infiltrated their sound, but that's not necessarily a bad thing. Kitschy '70s cop show synths, acid rock guitar solos, and '60s psych-pop catchiness are all also in the mix.
Just listen to the first track, the super groovy, yet poppy "Bir Yagmur Masali" and tell us you're not hooked. It's impossible to resist that groove! They should have added this to the Psych Funk 101 curriculum (that comp we reviewed last list)! Reminds us a bit of South Korea's great San Ul Lim, who were of similar style, and vintage.
Soulful male vocals are contrasted with fuzzed out, funky bass. Whistling synth lines and cinematically wordless female vocals also adorn these songs. Hardal definitely have a typically romantic vibe derived from the traditional folk music of their homeland, but even at its mellowest, some tasty fuzz or badass groove is never that far away.
We don't know what Hardal means, but the album title Nasil? Ne Zaman? apparently translates as How? When? If the question involves getting down to some killer Turkish tuneage, the answer is: this is how, and the time is now!!
And as usual with Shadoks, the cd booklet provides informative liner notes, color photos, and press clippings.
MPEG Stream: "Bir Yagmur Masali"
MPEG Stream: "Unuttum "
MPEG Stream: "Sen Gittin Diye"

album cover HARDAL Nereden Nereye! (Underground Masters) cd 21.00

album cover HAYVANLAR ALEMI Guarana Superpower (Sublime Frequencies) cd 17.98
This amazing, previously vinyl only, Sublime Frequencies release, finally available on cd!!!
Ethiopiques meets Torch Of The Mystics? Cambodian pop meets Turkish psych rock? Freaked out surf rock meets Saharan guitar music? Howabout all of the above...?
The very first release on the Sun City Girls' Sublime Frequency label from Istanbul-based instrumental psychedelic surf / space rock band Hayvanlar Alemi, their first proper album, and their first record readily available outside of Turkey.
The thing that makes this Hayvanlar Alemi record work in the context of Sublime Frequencies, is that it borrows from a super varied set of sounds, from all sorts of musics, each track here sounding like it could possibly be from some other SF release, twanged out desert psych, moody Eastern garage pop, fuzzy druggy almost krautrock style drift, a few of the tracks even sound like they could be some Sun City Girls Torch Of The Mystics B side! But somehow these guys make all those different sounds work, this whole record holds together perfectly and flows like a proper album, a super expansive and sonically rich collection of modern psychedelia, beholden to all the various musics that came before.
The sound on Guarana Superpower is definitely exotic, lush, with Eastern melodies, simple hypnotic percussion, long droning tones, looped motorik grooves, plenty of buzz, and jangle, and crunch, rhythms that veer from spare and skeletal to wild and splattery, songs drift from tranquil shimmer to meditative buzz to occasional blasts of full on chaotic freaked out in-the-red psychedelia, but even in the midst of those noisy squalls, the instrumentation is distinctly Eastern, the result some fantastical Eastern psychedelic noise rock. It's during those moments that the Torch Of The Mystics comparisons become even more apt. The record is of course rife with references to traditional Turkish folk music, Turkish classical music, sixties and seventies Turkish psych rock, as well as all the above mentioned NON Turkish sounds and influences, all filtered through a modern avant rock sensibility. There are a few tracks of surfy, bluesy garage rock stomp as well, but again, even those jams are infused with a vibe and energy that is way more Eastern than Western. So good. And such a perfect fit for Sublime Frequencies...
MPEG Stream: "Mega Lambada"
MPEG Stream: "Mavi Sepet"
MPEG Stream: "Karpuzkafa 777"
MPEG Stream: "Guve Diskosu"

album cover HAYVANLAR ALEMI Guarana Superpower (Sublime Frequencies) lp 21.00
Ethiopiques meets Torch Of The Mystics? Cambodian pop meets Turkish psych rock? Freaked out surf rock meets Saharan guitar music? Howabout all of the above...?
The very first release on the Sun City Girls' Sublime Frequency label from Istanbul-based instrumental psychedelic surf / space rock band Hayvanlar Alemi, their first vinyl lp, and their first record readily available outside of Turkey.
The thing that makes this Hayvanlar Alemi record work in the context of Sublime Frequencies, is that it borrows from a super varied set of sounds, from all sorts of musics, each track here sounding like it could possibly be from some other SF release, twanged out desert psych, moody Eastern garage pop, fuzzy druggy almost krautrock style drift, a few of the tracks even sound like they could be some Sun City Girls Torch Of The Mystics B side! But somehow these guys make all those different sounds work, this whole record holds together perfectly and flows like a proper album, a super expansive and sonically rich collection of modern psychedelia, beholden to all the various musics that came before.
The sound on Guarana Superpower is definitely exotic, lush, with Eastern melodies, simple hypnotic percussion, long droning tones, looped motorik grooves, plenty of buzz, and jangle, and crunch, rhythms that veer from spare and skeletal to wild and splattery, songs drift from tranquil shimmer to meditative buzz to occasional blasts of full on chaotic freaked out in-the-red psychedelia, but even in the midst of those noisy squalls, the instrumentation is distinctly Eastern, the result some fantastical Eastern psychedelic noise rock. It's during those moments that the Torch Of The Mystics comparisons become even more apt. The record is of course rife with references to traditional Turkish folk music, Turkish classical music, sixties and seventies Turkish psych rock, as well as all the above mentioned NON Turkish sounds and influences, all filtered through a modern avant rock sensibility. There are a few tracks of surfy, bluesy garage rock stomp as well, but again, even those jams are infused with a vibe and energy that is way more Eastern than Western. So good. And such a perfect fit for Sublime Frequencies...
As always, this is a super limited one time vinyl pressing, nice thick vinyl, housed in a heavy old school style tip-on jacket.

album cover HAYVANLAR ALEMI Twisted Souvenirs (Unrock) lp 28.00
Yay, Turkey's answer to the Sun City Girls is back with their 3rd full-length album! We're talking real GOOD Sun City Girls, like Torch Of The Mystics, 330,003 Crossdressers, or the group's swansong Funeral Mariachi. Not a surprise that their previous record and 7" single both came out on ex-Sun City Girl Alan Bishop's Sublime Frequencies label, and that this one is on Unrock, a German imprint that up to now had specialized solely in releases featuring Sir Richard Bishop, also formerly of the Sun City Girls. The Ankara-based Hayvanlar Alemi trio (their name in English means 'The World Of Animals', btw) clearly have the Bishop brothers' seal of approval, and could be considered SCG proteges, carrying the torch (of the mystics) passed by the now defunct SCG's.
Their all-instrumental music is a similar, wide-ranging, partially improvised mixture of Western and 'world music' influences - an exciting, exotic synthesis of psychedelic surf rock and various Near Eastern / Middle Eastern / Far Eastern ethnic soundsÉ So if you're into classic Ethiopian groove (they are, covering Mulatu Astatke's wonderful "Yekermo Sew" here, which also appeared on that aforementioned single), and contemporary North African guitar groups like those found on many Sublime Frequencies releases, and all those cool obscure international '60s garage combos from everywhere from Turkey to Thailand we're always heralding reissues and compilations of, then Hayvanlar Alemi's jams are gonna be your jams too. Likewise probably if you dig some other excellent bands also currently doing the 'ethnic-psych' thing, like Swedish Afro-fuzz purveyors Goat or Mexican cumbia-psicodelico instrumentalists Sonido Gallo Negro.
This new lp-only album, limited to 750 copies, provides eight more 'twisted souvenirs' from Hayvanlar's sonic world explorations, which can be both heavy and atmospheric, shimmering and sinuous, fuzzed-out and groovy, often all of the above at once! Great stuff, recommended!
MPEG Stream: "Hadron Collider Twist"
MPEG Stream: "Yekermo Sew"

album cover HAYVANLAR ALEMI Yekermo Sew (Sublime Frequencies) 7" 9.98
We already know that any Sublime Frequencies release is gonna be desirable - and not just 'cause it's undoubtedly limited in edition, especially the vinyl variety. But this one's really rad. A 45rpm 7" single from modern day Turkish psych band Hayvanlar Alemi, whose SF full length Guarana Superpower had us likening 'em to a surfy Sun City Girls steeped in the Anadolu pop playbook of the late '60s/early '70s, in other words they're the descendants of the likes of Mogollar, 3 Hur-el, Baris Manco, and Sublime Frequencies labelmate Erkin Koray, mixed with many other psychedelic influences.
The B side here is a cool unreleased improv jam, live in the studio in their hometown of Ankara. But it's the A side that makes this a double whammy for international groovy music lovers - it's a heavily rocked up, killer cover of the classic song by Ethio-jazz legend Mulatu Astatke! Even if you don't know it by name, chances are you'll recognize it when you hear it.
Now we'd like to hear Hayvanlar Alemi do an entire Ethiopiques album...

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