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IMPORTANT (Please read to avoid confusion):
Some items below may be tagged with a bold, red, all-caps "out of print/unavailable" notice. This does NOT mean that all other items not so tagged are, in fact, in stock -- or for that matter, in print and available, though there's a good chance they are. Some folks get confused on this point, and we can see why, so please read this for further clarification and other important before-you-order information. Unlike some mailorder websites, we don't have an electronic inventory system linked to our site, so you can't be sure of what we actually have or don't have in stock at any given moment without asking us -- please email our mailorder department for availability status -- or better yet, just go ahead and place your order using our shopping cart function and we'll get back to you with the status of each item. If you have general non-mailorder questions, email the store.


album cover FLAHERTY, PAUL & CHRIS CORSANO The Beloved Music (Family Vineyard) cd 14.98
Not sure what it is, but a lot of the new wave of post-hardcore improvised jazz leaves us really cold. Naysayers and squares have always described free jazz as just a bunch of noise, a bunch of honking skronking non-music. And as much as we fancy ourselves lovers of free jazz AND diggers of all manner of noise, we have occasionally lamentedly found ourselves playing that role, you know, the grumpy and bitter old music man, reflecting on the glory of the good ol' days, admonishing the younguns "That's nothing but noise, give that dangnabbit rackit a rest!" Or something appropriately crotchety like that.
But every once in a while, for whatever reason, one of those records sneaks through and kicks our ass. This is one of those records.
It helps that Corsano and Flaherty have been honing their improvisational mind melds for years now. Their interplay is fluid and fierce, a free jazz freakout as sublime as it is pummeling. Corsano (who also does time in free folk weirdos Sunburned Hand Of The Man) and Flaherty (a legend amongst free jazz fiends) spar and weave, Flaherty's sax spewing thick gushes of corrosive sound, a downright Borbetomagusian cascade of shreiks and groans, sputters and wheezes, but it's Corsano who holds it all together, an incredible gush of dense and delirious drumming, from impossibly subtle shuffle and skitter to an avalanche of percussion pummel unrivalled. Holy shit! So massive and emotionally charged, freaked out and wild and free. But Corsano and Flaherty manage to imbue each white hot burst with strangely soothing atonal melodies and rhythms that manage to be downright catchy, so much so that on repeated listens we find ourselves almost humming along to Corsano's solo stretches. Amazing stuff!
MPEG Stream: "The Great Pine Tar Scandal"
MPEG Stream: "A Lean And Tortured Heart"

album cover FLAMEN DIALIS Symptome - Dei (MIO Records) cd 16.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
BACK IN STOCK, last ever copies however as the MIO label has sadly chosen to close up shop! So we grabbed a few of our faves (this and the Jean Cohen-Solal). Here's our review from when we first listed this:
We've been doing this long enough to know that there's certain types of AQ customers we can rely upon. One catagory being those into the weird, obscure '70s prog-psych stuff. Folks who know what the Nurse With Wound list is (heck maybe even have it memorized), and can't help but be more excited about lost treasures from 30 years ago being reissued on cd than they are about the latest indie-rock or electronica gem (though chances are you might dig those too). Well if you're one of those folks, or maybe just feel especially sonically adventurous today, we've got another reissue for ya: Flamen Dialis. Which is, we're told, the ancient Roman name for the high priest of Jupiter, and is a suitably archaic name for an quite arcane sounding band. Like Magma (and some of our favorite previous MIO reissues, Jean-Cohen Solal and Birge-Gorge-Shirac) this group hailed from France, and indeed this has a bit of that cosmic Magma vibe to it. They released this now very rare record, their sole album, in 1979, and there's also a 7" Flamen Dialis single from 1978 included on this cd reissue too. The music they made was progressive and psychedelic, but not exactly rock. It's weird and atmospheric, soundtracky stuff, very ritualistic and repetitive in nature. With chants and whispers, martial drums and zinging synths, vibraphone and Mellotron, flutes and even some brief blues guitar licks and what sounds like a rhythm machine, this is quite otherwordly and dreamlike -- not exactly dreamy (or nightmarish either) just strange. Both eerie and a little goofy too... Like a soundtrack (or a dream), themes are revisted, and the album drifts smoothly from Medieval European to Eastern sounding exoticism. We're reminded a bit of that Musique de la Grece Antique album of pseudo-ancient Greek music by the Atrium Musicae de Madrid (an AQ perennial) and Igor Wakhevitch and Franco Battiato and Magical Power Mako and, well, if you're with us this far you *are* one of the AQ customers mentioned above and maybe should just trust us when we say you ought to check this out!
MPEG Stream: "Dernier Croisade"
MPEG Stream: "Decouverte"

FLAMIN GROOVIES Flamingo (Karma Sutra / Buddah) lp 16.98

FLAMIN GROOVIES Teenage Head (Karma Sutra / Buddah) lp 16.98

FLAMIN' GROOVIES Flamingo & Teenage Head (Rev-Ola) cd 16.98

FLAMIN' GROOVIES Shake Some Action (DBK Works) cd 16.98

FLAMIN' GROOVIES Shake Some Action (4 Men With Beards) lp 16.98

album cover FLAMIN' GROOVIES Slow Death (Norton) cd 14.98

FLAMIN' GROOVIES Slow Death: Amazin' High Energy Rock N' Roll 1971-73! (Norton) lp 14.98

FLAMIN' GROOVIES Teenage Head (Columbia) cd 5.00
**SALE **SALE* *SALE**

FLAMING GROOVIES Supersnazz (Norton Records) lp 14.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.

FLAMING LIPS A Collection of Songs Representing... (Restless) cd 16.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
I guess you could call this a 'best of' collection of tracks from 1984 - 1990 from the Flaming Lips, but most of the tracks are such odd choices as to qualify for such a title (not that they aren't good). Nonetheless, more of the weird post-Butthole Surfers psychedelia and lysergic pop one has grown to expect from the.

album cover FLAMING LIPS At War With The Mystics (Warner Bros.) cd 16.98
How do you make a record after releasing two of the best records of the last decade? Back to back amazing albums that will stand the test of time. How do you follow up that feat?? Well instead of making something quite as monumental and epic as those records the Lips just decided to make another damn good album. At war with the powers that be and those on the other side who get it all so wrong in their fanatical ways. Somehow The Flaming Lips have managed to become a voice of reason in these all too weird times. With some nods to their Clouds Taste Metallic past and for sure many of the same reach for the sky dream-on elements of The Soft Bulletin and Yoshimi Battles The Pink Robots. Some of the all out fun moments on this record prove once again that no one knows joy better then Wayne Coyne does. "Haven't Got A Clue" will be right up there with one of our favorite songs of the year. The Flaming Lips still got their endearing spirit and creative minds in full swing. We're pretty damn happy that they keep on keeping on.
MPEG Stream: "Haven't Got A Clue"
MPEG Stream: "Vein Of Stars"
MPEG Stream: "The W.A.N.D."

album cover FLAMING LIPS At War With The Mystics 5.1 (Warner Bros.) cd+dvd 24.00
This whole reissuing records months or years after they come out, even when the original is still available and working out for everybody just fine, is getting way out of hand. You buy a record, and a few months later, you gotta buy it again if you want the bonus tracks and the making of DVD. But what can you do? When it's a band you love, you kind of just have to suck it up. Thankfully, the Flaming Lips have gone to great lengths to make this reissue well worth buying all over again. It's a little pricey, but it is so jam packed with extra goodies it's pretty dang hard to resist.
The normal record is included of course as a remastered 2.0 stereo version (we're not even sure what that means but it sounds good!). The bonus DVD is where all the action is. First, a 5.1 surround sound version of the record, 5 outtakes, in 2.0 stereo, as well as their version of "Bohemian Rhapsody", in 5.1 surround sound of course! 8 tracks from different radio sessions, also presented in hi res 2.0 stereo. Phew. But wait, that's just the DVD-AUDIO portion. There are also three videos, all of the extra tracks presented in Dolby digital 2.0 stereo and Wayne Coyne giving the commencement speech at Classen High. Holy crap. That's a lot of extras. But just in case you forgot what the record even sounds like, here's what we had to say about it the first time around:
How do you make a record after releasing two of the best records of the last decade? Back to back amazing albums that will stand the test of time. How do you follow up that feat?? Well instead of making something quite as monumental and epic as those records the Lips just decided to make another damn good album. At war with the powers that be and those on the other side who get it all so wrong in their fanatical ways. Somehow The Flaming Lips have managed to become a voice of reason in these all too weird times. With some nods to their Clouds Taste Metallic past and for sure many of the same reach for the sky dream-on elements of The Soft Bulletin and Yoshimi Battles The Pink Robots. Some of the all out fun moments on this record prove once again that no one knows joy better then Wayne Coyne does. "Haven't Got A Clue" will be right up there with one of our favorite songs of the year. The Flaming Lips still got their endearing spirit and creative minds in full swing. We're pretty damn happy that they keep on keeping on.
MPEG Stream: "Haven't Got A Clue"
MPEG Stream: "Vein Of Stars"
MPEG Stream: "The W.A.N.D."

album cover FLAMING LIPS Clouds Taste Metallic (Warner Bros) cd 12.98
Not counting their four disc anomaly known as Zaireeka, this was the album that preceded Flaming Lips' super smash hit of gigantonormous proportions, The Soft Bulletin. 'Tis very very excellent in its own psych-pop-addled ways!!
MPEG Stream: "This Here Giraffe"
MPEG Stream: "Christmas At The Zoo"

album cover FLAMING LIPS Ego Tripping At The Gates Of Hell (Warner) cd ep 10.98
A new EP from AQ fave the Flaming Lips with 4 brand new songs as good as anything on their most recent full length Yoshimi Battles The Pink Robots (re-listed and reviewed again elsewhere on this list). The opener "Assassination Of The Sun" is one of the best Lips songs in a while. Wonder how it managed to get left off Yoshimi. Gorgeous sweeping strings, an unbelievably catchy hook, and Wayne's sweetly cracked falsetto. So good. This is gonna be on mixtapes everywhere befor you know it. The second track "I'm A Fly In A Sunbeam" is a dreamy instrumental slab of fuzzy, waltzy Lawrence-Welk-on-LSD sentimental sweetness. Which smoothly segues into the classic Lips epic dream-pop of "Sunship Balloons". Our advice is to skip the next three tracks, totally LAME house/disco/dance remixes that just suck. Maybe their recent foray onto the dancefloor with their tweaked cover of that Kylie Minogue song made them think they should givee it another try. They were wrong. But the finale redeems them, as it's a Christmas song, and if there's any band who should be allowed to do a Christmas song, it's the Flaming Lips, since most of their songs sound like Christmas songs anyway, all chimes and strings and fuzzy snowy harmonies. That and the fact that they have a full length film coming out this Christmas called Christmas On Mars. So definitely pick this up, but stay away from the dancefloor. You have been warned.
MPEG Stream: "Assassination Of The Sun"
MPEG Stream: "Do You Realize (T.P.S. Remix)"

album cover FLAMING LIPS Embryonic (Warner Bros) cd 14.98
Okay, we love the Flaming Lips. We have for ages. We recently revisited In A Priest Driven Ambulance, Oh My Gawd!, Telepathic Surgery, and Hear It Is, and we were struck by just how awesome those records still sound, and how amazingly and brilliantly fucked up that band was, and basically still are. Every record, we were just waiting, dying to see what the band would do next, what kind of skewed pop brilliance they would cook up, or what sort of deafening noise weirdness they might smother perfect pop songs with. Live was even better. One of their early shows here, involved more Christmas lights than we had ever seen, then there was the whole Zaireeka unmixed 4cd set meant to be played simultaneously. Who would have thought that a band like that would achieve mainstream success. Who would headline Lollapalooza, Treasure Island, that they would be the kind of band your PARENTS WOULD LIKE. But they did, and we were cool with it. The Soft Bulletin was a genius record, and with the release of that record, they moved up and on. And everything they got they deserved and THEN SOME. But then a weird thing happened, they stopped experimenting so much. Sure they had strings, and unique production techniques, and live they had the big plastic ball and people in furry suits, but the records began to run together and sound the same. Still great, and by modern pop standards, plenty strange, but by FLAMING LIPS standards, they were getting closer and closer to becoming one of those bands that required the word 'old' when describing them as a band you dug. "Yeah, I was pretty into OLD Flaming Lips".
So we weren't all that hopeful about this new record, even when we heard rumblings of how weird it was, we figured it was just mainstream pop weird, not Flaming Lips weird. But whattayaknow? It is weird. FLAMING LIPS WEIRD! And wonderful, and twisted, still poppy and sort of catchy, but way more NOT. In some ways, it seems like commercial suicide. A band that popular, purposefully making a record, that most normal festival goers would NEVER blast in their SUV on the way to Whole Foods. But fuck it, if anyone can pull it off, and come out the other side smelling like roses, it's the Lips. Listening to Embryonic, it's exciting to think about these obtuse fractured jams blasting through the same PA as Kanye or Lady GaGa. And obtuse and fractured they are. Tripped out, druggy, psychedelic, rhythmic and layered. Effects everywhere, sounds careening all over the stereo field, vocals distorted, guitars twisted and mangled, chiming and screaming and buzzing, the vocals more mantra like than ever. Sure it's not like the old OLD record, but hell c'mon, these guys are in their 40s and 50s, and their making some seriously challenging freaky avant space rock drone pop what-the-fuck.
But don't get us wrong, there's plenty of prettiness, lovely melodies, lilting vocals, warm whirring instrumentation, but it's surrounded on all sides, by strange samples, fuzzed out bass lines, warbly synths, long stretches of staticky drift, super distorted drums, wild psychedelic guitar freakouts, it's the kind of record, that will most likely deter plenty of casual listeners, but those who dig deep. let the sounds wash over them, who get lost with the band, in whatever fucked up mysterious world music like this exists in, well, then, those folks are the chosen ones, and will discover something magical, melodic and fucking genius.
MPEG Stream: "The Sparrow Looks Up At The Machine"
MPEG Stream: "Aquarius Sabotage"
MPEG Stream: "Powerless"
MPEG Stream: "Worm Mountain"
MPEG Stream: "Watching The Planets"

album cover FLAMING LIPS Embryonic (Warner Bros) 2lp + cd 29.00
Now available on deluxe double colored vinyl, packaged with cd of the full album!
Okay, we love the Flaming Lips. We have for ages. We recently revisited In A Priest Driven Ambulance, Oh My Gawd!, Telepathic Surgery, and Hear It Is, and we were struck by just how awesome those records still sound, and how amazingly and brilliantly fucked up that band was, and basically still are. Every record, we were just waiting, dying to see what the band would do next, what kind of skewed pop brilliance they would cook up, or what sort of deafening noise weirdness they might smother perfect pop songs with. Live was even better. One of their early shows here, involved more Christmas lights than we had ever seen, then there was the whole Zaireeka unmixed 4cd set meant to be played simultaneously. Who would have thought that a band like that would achieve mainstream success. Who would headline Lollapalooza, Treasure Island, that they would be the kind of band your PARENTS WOULD LIKE. But they did, and we were cool with it. The Soft Bulletin was a genius record, and with the release of that record, they moved up and on. And everything they got they deserved and THEN SOME. But then a weird thing happened, they stopped experimenting so much. Sure they had strings, and unique production techniques, and live they had the big plastic ball and people in furry suits, but the records began to run together and sound the same. Still great, and by modern pop standards, plenty strange, but by FLAMING LIPS standards, they were getting closer and closer to becoming one of those bands that required the word 'old' when describing them as a band you dug. "Yeah, I was pretty into OLD Flaming Lips".
So we weren't all that hopeful about this new record, even when we heard rumblings of how weird it was, we figured it was just mainstream pop weird, not Flaming Lips weird. But whattayaknow? It is weird. FLAMING LIPS WEIRD! And wonderful, and twisted, still poppy and sort of catchy, but way more NOT. In some ways, it seems like commercial suicide. A band that popular, purposefully making a record, that most normal festival goers would NEVER blast in their SUV on the way to Whole Foods. But fuck it, if anyone can pull it off, and come out the other side smelling like roses, it's the Lips. Listening to Embryonic, it's exciting to think about these obtuse fractured jams blasting through the same PA as Kanye or Lady GaGa. And obtuse and fractured they are. Tripped out, druggy, psychedelic, rhythmic and layered. Effects everywhere, sounds careening all over the stereo field, vocals distorted, guitars twisted and mangled, chiming and screaming and buzzing, the vocals more mantra like than ever. Sure it's not like the old OLD record, but hell c'mon, these guys are in their 40s and 50s, and their making some seriously challenging freaky avant space rock drone pop what-the-fuck.
But don't get us wrong, there's plenty of prettiness, lovely melodies, lilting vocals, warm whirring instrumentation, but it's surrounded on all sides, by strange samples, fuzzed out bass lines, warbly synths, long stretches of staticky drift, super distorted drums, wild psychedelic guitar freakouts, it's the kind of record, that will most likely deter plenty of casual listeners, but those who dig deep. let the sounds wash over them, who get lost with the band, in whatever fucked up mysterious world music like this exists in, well, then, those folks are the chosen ones, and will discover something magical, melodic and fucking genius.
MPEG Stream: "The Sparrow Looks Up At The Machine"
MPEG Stream: "Aquarius Sabotage"
MPEG Stream: "Powerless"
MPEG Stream: "Worm Mountain"
MPEG Stream: ""

album cover FLAMING LIPS Fight Test (Warner Bros.) cd ep 10.98
A nice little ep from the Flaming Lips, whose last 2 records we have raved about (hell, we've loved everything they've ever done) and who continue to be one of the only major label bands that does everything right (taking full advantage of being bankrolled by a massive corporation), freaky videos, performing via radio signal to an audience all wearing receivers, boombox parking lot concerts, a quadruple disc to be played back on 4 cd players, a forthcoming movie about Christmas on Mars, and now this Flight Test ep. The best part of this release is that it had been selling for close to $50 on eBay as recently as a couple months ago. So unless you were one of the few folks who could afford a $50 radio promo cdep, now is the time to snap this up for only ten bucks! The main reason to pick this up is the covers, a gorgeously faithful version of Radiohead's Knives Out as well as Kylie Minogue's Can't Get You Out Of My Head, realised here as a lugubrious, slow motion pop song, all warbling vocals and ominous strings, a nice change from the hi-energy house music of the original. Also features some different versions of tracks from Yoshimi Battles The Pink Robots, their most recent full length, as well as a few new songs: The Strange Design Of Conscience and the brilliantly titled Thank You Jack White (For The Fiver-Optic Jesus That You Gave Me).
MPEG Stream: "Can't Get You Out Of My Head"
MPEG Stream: "Knives Out"

album cover FLAMING LIPS Finally The Punk Rockers Are Taking Acid (Ryko / Restless) 3cd 32.00
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
I think it's kinda funny that people have been buying/playing this collection incessantly. Why you ask? Well, you'll find none of the off kilter grandiose baroque pop of the Soft Bulletin, none of the surreal noise-pop epics of Clouds Taste Metallic, in fact if they weren't told this was the Flaming Lips, I'm guessing the majority of folks would have no idea. And I can see a lot of Soft Bulletin fans being WAY not into this. Not to say this is bad, because it's not. It's amazing! But it's also sloppy and ramshackle and noisy and chaotic and occasionally tuneless with EXTENDED freak out jams and yelped and howled vocals. This stuff is the very earliest Lips material, some of it from before Wayne even started singing (and the vocals were handled (rather poorly) by his little brother) and it shows. Definite eighties / college radio / Homestead records / Butthole Surfers / Scratch Acid vibe, which makes sense, since that's the scene that spawned the 'Lips. There are hints of what was to come, perfect little melodies, super catchy hooks, but most of the time they're buried under drug addled, spaced out RAWK, with squealing guitars and splattery drumming. Reminiscent of the Replacements in the way that something so messy and noisy and chaotic can manage to be so catchy and practically perfect at the same time. This three disc set compiles the first Flaming Lips ep, the Hear It Is album, the Oh MY Gawd!!! album, the Telepathic Surgery album and TONS of bonus tracks!! Features some of their earliest classics: Jesus Shootin' Heroin, One Million Billionth Of A Millisecond On A Sunday Morning, Drug Machine In Heaven and lots more. Andee says completely essential!!! But not if you're only Lips experience is The Soft Bulletin. Fans of freaked out, fucked up, spaced out psychedelic drug rock, will find LOTS to like here.
RealAudio clip: "With You"
RealAudio clip: "Jesus Shootin' Heroin"
RealAudio clip: "Everything's Explodin'"
RealAudio clip: "One Million Billionth of a Millisecond on a Sunday Morning"

FLAMING LIPS Heady Nuggs 1992-2002 (Warner Brothers) 5lp-box 142.00
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.

album cover FLAMING LIPS Hit To Death In The Future Head (Warner Bros) cd 12.98

album cover FLAMING LIPS Hit To Death In The Future Head (Warner Bros.) lp 27.00
As much as we love the later, lush psychedelic experimental pop of the Flaming Lips, and the grungy, drug addled noise rock whatthefuck weirdness of those early records, we have to say our hearts truly belong to the three records that fall right in between, a fantastic trilogy of noisy psychedelic pop and twisted noise rock experimentalism, that chronicled the group's shift from the underground to the mainstream, and capturing them when they had a foot firmly in both. That shift started with this, 1992's Hit To Death In The Future Head, and continued on through 1993's Transmissions From The Satellite Heart and 1995's The Clouds Taste Metallic. All of these have been reissued on vinyl, and hopefully we'll list them all, but it makes sense to start here. Cuz before Hit To Death, while the band were definitely pop savvy, they were also still punks, and antagonistic and naturally sonically subversive, they tossed off bits of pop like it was nothing, often tossing that pop into the midst of a 10 minute drugged out psych jam, or some warped garbled noisiness, Hit To Death, while not devoid of that stuff, was the first time where the band seeming went for it, happy to play a pop song without dousing it in noise or pulling it a part after the first chorus. That said, for a pop record, even one as tangentially 'pop' as this one, it's weird as fuck. The awesomely titled opener "Talkin' 'Bout The Smiling Deathporn Immortality Blues (Everyone Wants To Live Forever)" is a super rocking noise pop classic, hooky as hell, but still rife with weird processed vox and wild psychedelic guitars, no amount of which could disguise just how good these guys were at whipping up some crazy catchiness. "Hit Me Like You Did The First Time" explodes out of the gate with a killer superdistorted processed psych guitar melody, draped over acoustic guitar strum, swoonsome strings, and weird rubbery bass, and then when the song kicks in proper, it's another chunk of sunshiney acid drenched psych pop. It is the Flaming Lips though, so there is plenty of weirdness, fucked up sounds, bizarre production, it's only really slightly removed from their previous record In A Priest Driven Ambulance, but for every blast of psychedelic noisiness there's a strummy jangly chunk of indie pop like "Gingerale Afternoon (The Astrology Of A Saturday)" or a gorgeous plaintive psych pop classic like "Halloween On The Barbary Coast", which still ranks as one of the band's best. And that's really only scratching the surface, every track on Hit To Death is so great, hooky, heavy, tripped out, dreamy, super rocking, hypnotic and mesmerizing, anyone paying attention when Hit To Death came out, knew these guys were destined for bigger things, and even now, nearly 20 years later, it sounds as fresh and creative as ever, and still pretty much like nothing else out there.
MPEG Stream: "Talkin' 'Bout The Smiling Deathporn Immortality Blues (Everyone Wants To Live Forever)"
MPEG Stream: "Hit Me Like You Did The First Time"
MPEG Stream: "Halloween On The Barbary Coast"

album cover FLAMING LIPS Peace Sword (Warner Bros.) cd 11.98
On this release for this year's Back To Black Friday Record Store Day (a sort of mini second part to April's big RSD extravaganza), the Flaming Lips offer up their song from the Ender's Game soundtrack, and it's classic Flaming Lips, at least the more modern iteration, bombastic, cotton candy megawatt orchestral psych pop, swirling FX, martial drumming, lots of shimmering synths, keening vocals, aching harmonies, lilting melodies, twisted sci-fi production, everything gauzy and reverby and prismatic. The rest of the tracks get a bit weirder, but unlike past B side excursions, they don't drift to far from the polished sympho-pop of the title track, there's the broody, pulsing sci-fi synthiness of "If They Move, Shoot 'Em", that eventually blossoms into some weird horn driven future pop bliss out, the aching heartfelt ballad that is "Is The Black At The End Good", that sounds like it could have been plucked right off their Yoshimi record, the minor key synth swirl cosmic ballad "Think Like A Machine, Not A Boy", and the loping, prog-pop of "Wolf Children, which is maybe the darkest and most dramatic of the bunch, until finally, the record winds down with the sprawling 10 minute closer, "Assassin Beetle - The Dream Is Ending", which starts off sounding like their recent full length the Terror, sort of krauty and spacey and creepy, before gradually morphing into a strange bit of orchestral exotica/cosmica, swirling faux strings, skittery, stuttery rhythms, robotic synth blurts, the vibe super cinematic and epic, building to a wild, noisy, grinding, distorted psychedelic coda, and more than the title track, sounding like music that could have accompanied one of the big battle scenes in the aforementioned big budget sci-fi blockbuster...
Very few copies left, and it was meant to be a Black Friday / Record Store Day release, so when we run out, we may not be able to get more...
MPEG Stream: "Peace Sword (Open Your Heart)"
MPEG Stream: "Wolf Children"
MPEG Stream: "Assassin Beetle - The Dream Is Ending"

album cover FLAMING LIPS Peace Sword (Warner Bros.) lp 19.98
On this release for this year's Back To Black Friday Record Store Day (a sort of mini second part to April's big RSD extravaganza), the Flaming Lips offer up their song from the Ender's Game soundtrack, and it's classic Flaming Lips, at least the more modern iteration, bombastic, cotton candy megawatt orchestral psych pop, swirling FX, martial drumming, lots of shimmering synths, keening vocals, aching harmonies, lilting melodies, twisted sci-fi production, everything gauzy and reverby and prismatic. The rest of the tracks get a bit weirder, but unlike past B side excursions, they don't drift to far from the polished sympho-pop of the title track, there's the broody, pulsing sci-fi synthiness of "If They Move, Shoot 'Em", that eventually blossoms into some weird horn driven future pop bliss out, the aching heartfelt ballad that is "Is The Black At The End Good", that sounds like it could have been plucked right off their Yoshimi record, the minor key synth swirl cosmic ballad "Think Like A Machine, Not A Boy", and the loping, prog-pop of "Wolf Children, which is maybe the darkest and most dramatic of the bunch, until finally, the record winds down with the sprawling 10 minute closer, "Assassin Beetle - The Dream Is Ending", which starts off sounding like their recent full length the Terror, sort of krauty and spacey and creepy, before gradually morphing into a strange bit of orchestral exotica/cosmica, swirling faux strings, skittery, stuttery rhythms, robotic synth blurts, the vibe super cinematic and epic, building to a wild, noisy, grinding, distorted psychedelic coda, and more than the title track, sounding like music that could have accompanied one of the big battle scenes in the aforementioned big budget sci-fi blockbuster...
Very few copies left, and it was meant to be a Black Friday / Record Store Day release, so when we run out, we may not be able to get more...
MPEG Stream: "Peace Sword (Open Your Heart)"
MPEG Stream: "Wolf Children"
MPEG Stream: "Assassin Beetle - The Dream Is Ending"

album cover FLAMING LIPS Telepathic Surgery (Restless) cd 13.98

FLAMING LIPS The Clouds Taste Metallic (Warner Bros.) lp 26.00

MPEG Stream: "The Abandoned Hospital Ship"
MPEG Stream: "Psychiatric Explorations Of The Fetus With Needles"
MPEG Stream: "This Here Giraffe"

album cover FLAMING LIPS The Day They Shot A Hole In The Jesus (Restless) 2cd 19.98
Part two in the comprehensive reissue of the Flaming Lips' early years. Now that the Lips are 'critical darlings' and 'alternative rock superstars' or whatever, people are obviously curious about all that stuff they were doing way back when nobody but a handful of punk rockers really cared. What they were doing was kicking out some ungodly jams. Loud and snotty and drug addled and psychedelic and spaced out and truly inspired. This 2 disc collection contains what is arguably their best pre-'pop' album In A Priest Driven Ambulance. The 'pop' is even closer to the surface than on their two previous records, Hear It Is and Oh My Gawd (recently reissued as the 3cd set Finally The Punk Rockers Are Taking Acid), but it's still buried safely under 16 tons of sludgy guitar, squealing feedback, splattery drums, straggly leads, bizarre religious imagery and ranting stream of conciousness lyrics. With the occasional Pink Floyd-ish existential acoustic epic. As far as the early stuff goes, if you're only exposure to the Lips is The Soft Bulletin or Yoshimi, this is probably their most 'accessible' album. And if you haven't already, pick up the three pre-Soft Bulletin albums: Hit To Death In The Future Head, Transmissions From The Sattelite Heart, and Clouds Taste Metallic to hear the amazing stuff that led up to their Soft Bulletin breakthrough!
RealAudio clip: "Unconsiously Screamin'"
RealAudio clip: "Take Meta Mars"

album cover FLAMING LIPS The Soft Bulletin (Warner Brothers) cd 12.98
Following a wholly unique progression, from drug-addled psych rock jam band to off kilter pop geniuses, the Flaming Lips keep on stretching the boundaries of 'pop' music, never losing sight of the song. They seem to have a unique understanding of the absurdity of the music they produce. We're not talking about the garden variety, pedestrian pastiche efforts of so many of today's indie pop bands (i.e. avant garde = birdsounds or 'out there' segues). The Lips' weirdness isn't manufactured or forced, it seems rather to be the result of some sort of dropped-on-their-head childhood mishap or an unprecedented series of synaptic misfires. It comes as less of a surprise then that this band was dragged kicking and screaming into mainstream success by a catchy little pop song about masturbation.
The Flaming Lips seem to be taking great advantage of their lofty position on a major label, doing their best to piss off the business minded folk of Warner, while at the same time managing to make truely amazing and creative records, like their last release Zaireeka, a 4 cd set composed to be listened to simultaneously on four separate cd players. While certainly not as labor-intensive for the listener as Zaireeka, The Soft Bulletin is another set of perfectly imperfect popsongs, albeit now accessible to the traditional one cd player household.
It's hard to describe The Flaming Lips without providing a visual reference, take their live show at Slims a few years back. It began with a pathetic solitary spotlight illuminating the band huddled around their instruments and plucking fragile solitary notes. With the initial crack of the drums, a dizzying kaleidoscope of tens of thousands of Christmas lights burst to life and engulfed Slims, offereing a hallucinatory visual equal to the Lips' psychedelic pop dadaism.
The Lips' disparate and patently un-pop elements; huge and fuzzy John Bonham-esque percussive bombast, ultra low frequency Moog oscillations, Wayne Coyne's still-getting-out-of-puberty voice crack, bizarre song struture, and an insane mastery of recording studio-as-instrument, come together more seamlessly than ever on The Soft Bulletin, making it our record of the week, and for some of us, record of the year.
MPEG Stream: "Race For The Prize"
MPEG Stream: "Waitin' For Superman"

album cover FLAMING LIPS The Soft Bulletin (Warner Bros.) 2lp 36.00
One of six new lp reissues as part of a new comprehensive vinyl reissue program for everyone's favorite psychedelic weirdos turned mainstream indie rock heroes. The Soft Bulletin, was no doubt The Flaming Lips' breakthrough record, following a wholly unique progression, from drug-addled psych rock jam band to off kilter pop geniuses, the Flaming Lips kept on stretching the boundaries of 'pop' music, never losing sight of the song. They seem to have a unique understanding of the absurdity of the music they produce. We're not talking about the garden variety, pedestrian pastiche efforts of so many of today's indie pop bands (i.e. avant garde = birdsounds or 'out there' segues). The Lips' weirdness isn't manufactured or forced, it seems rather to be the result of some sort of dropped-on-their-head childhood mishap or an unprecedented series of synaptic misfires, or more likely, a lifetime of overindulgence and drug use. It came as less of a surprise then that this band was finally dragged kicking and screaming into mainstream success by a catchy little pop song about masturbation.
The Flaming Lips did what we all hoped they would by taking advantage of their lofty position on a major label, doing their best to piss off the business minded folk of Warner, while at the same time managing to make truely amazing and creative records. There was 'Zaireeka', a 4 cd set composed to be listened to simultaneously on four separate cd players. While certainly not as labor-intensive for the listener as Zaireeka, The Soft Bulletin, was definitely another set of perfectly imperfect popsongs, albeit now accessible to the traditional one cd player household.
While most readers of the aQ list are certainly familiar with the Lips, for the uninitiated it's hard to describe them without providing a visual reference, take their live show at Slims years and years ago. It began with a pathetic solitary spotlight illuminating the band huddled around their instruments and plucking fragile solitary notes. With the initial crack of the drums, a dizzying kaleidoscope of tens of thousands of Christmas lights burst to life and engulfed Slims, offereing a hallucinatory visual equal to the Lips' psychedelic pop dadaism.
The Lips' disparate and patently un-pop elements; huge and fuzzy John Bonham-esque percussive bombast, ultra low frequency Moog oscillations, Wayne Coyne's still-getting-out-of-puberty voice crack, bizarre song struture, and an insane mastery of recording studio-as-instrument, came together more seamlessly than ever on The Soft Bulletin, which is why when it was first released we made it our Record Of The Week, and pretty sure for some of us, it was our record of the year that year as well.
Also part of this new reissue campaign, are the three preceeding Lips albums, which while not nearly as poppy, we might actually dig even more:
1995's Clouds Taste Metallic, 1993's Transmissions From the Satellite Heart and 1992's Hit to Death in the Future Head, all of which had us wondering how long it would take for the rest of the world to catch on, and this record right here took care of that!
MPEG Stream: "Race For The Prize"
MPEG Stream: "Waitin' For Superman"

album cover FLAMING LIPS The Soft Bulletin 5.1 (Warner) cd + dvd 23.00
FLAMING LIPS FANS!!! THE SOFT BULLETIN IS BACK!!! BIGGER AND BETTER THAN EVER!!! Okay, sorry for all the yelling, but we figured that this newly renovate cd/dvd edition of an AQ all-time favorite deserved a gigantic monster truck rally kind of (re)introduction, don't you?
Now you can experience it in "Advanced Resolution Surround Sound". Oooooh, got yer bong loaded?
The audio section of the dvd contains the full album presented in the abovementioned Advanced Resolution 5.1 Surround Sound (24bit 96kHz) as well as Advanced Resolution 2.0 Stereo (24bit 96kHz). The video section of the dvd includes what is descriptively named "Bleep-Blop Visualizations" with Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround Sound (16bit 44.1kHz) and Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo (16bit 44.1kHz). Maybe more notably than that, there's also videos for "Waitin' For Superman" and "Race For The Prize", outtakes for "1000ft Hands", "The Captain" and "Satellite Of You", and finally, radio sessions of "Up Above The Daily Hum", The Switch That Turns Off The Universe", "We Can't Predict The Future" and "It Remains Unrealizable" (all Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo 16bit 44.1kHz).
If you grow weary of all the high tech whachamacallits, there's also a so-called conventional cd for when you wanna rough it. Heh heh.
In case your memory's a bit rusty or you've somehow yet to encounter Soft Bulletin, here's what we said about the album waaay back in 1999:
Following a wholly unique progression, from drug-addled psych rock jam band to off kilter pop geniuses, the Flaming Lips keep on stretching the boundaries of 'pop' music, never losing sight of the song. They seem to have a unique understanding of the absurdity of the music they produce. We're not talking about the garden variety, pedestrian pastiche efforts of so many of today's indie pop bands (i.e. avant garde = birdsounds or 'out there' segues). The Lips' weirdness isn't manufactured or forced, it seems rather to be the result of some sort of dropped-on-their-head childhood mishap or an unprecedented series of synaptic misfires. It comes as less of a surprise then that this band was dragged kicking and screaming into mainstream success by a catchy little pop song about masturbation.
The Flaming Lips seem to be taking great advantage of their lofty position on a major label, doing their best to piss off the business minded folk of Warner, while at the same time managing to make truly amazing and creative records, like their last release Zaireeka' a 4 cd set composed to be listened to simultaneously on four separate cd players. While certainly not as labor-intensive for the listener as Zaireeka, The Soft Bulletin is another set of perfectly imperfect popsongs, albeit now accessible to the traditional one cd player household.
It's hard to describe The Flaming Lips without providing a visual reference, take their live show at Slims a few years back. It began with a pathetic solitary spotlight illuminating the band huddled around their instruments and plucking fragile solitary notes. With the initial crack of the drums, a dizzying kaleidoscope of tens of thousands of Christmas lights burst to life and engulfed Slims, offereing a hallucinatory visual equal to the Lips' psychedelic pop dadaism.
The Lips' disparate and patently un-pop elements; huge and fuzzy John Bonham-esque percussive bombast, ultra low frequency Moog oscillations, Wayne Coyne's still-getting-out-of-puberty voice crack, bizarre song struture, and an insane mastery of recording studio-as-instrument, come together more seamlessly than ever on The Soft Bulletin, making it our record of the week, and for some of us, record of the year.
MPEG Stream: "Race For The Prize"
MPEG Stream: "Waitin' For Superman"

album cover FLAMING LIPS The Terror (Warner Bros.) cd 14.98
We never really stopped digging the Flaming Lips. We'll always probably be partial to the early days, the chaotic, drug addled noise rock psych pop era of course, but even more so that transitional three album arc that marked the band's transition from fucked up underground legends to weirdo stadium rock popstars, Hit To Death In The Future Head, Transmissions From The Satellite Heart and Clouds Taste Metallic. With The Soft Bulletin, the band embraced their pop side, and it paid off, and we have to say we're pretty thrilled, that a band this weird, could end up being one of the most popular bands in the world. And it's pretty heartening, that even while they were crafting these crazy commercial records, they continued to be willfully difficult, and extremely experimental and unconventional. From crazy elaborate performances to bizarre limited releases (thumb drive in a human sized gummy skull!), they're essentially one of the only bands who never seemed to be corrupted by success, and who never let that success go to their heads, or really affect their music. In fact, if anything, the Lips seem to have peaked pop wise with the trilogy of The Soft Bulletin, Yoshimi Battles The Pink Robots and At War With The Mystics, and ever since, they seem to have been getting less and less commercial, like some sort of musical Benjamin Buttons. 2009's Embryonic was pretty weird, but The Terror trumps it big time.
Originally rumored to be a return to the band's old sound, The Terror instead finds the band slipping into a sort of abstract experimental almost krautrock sounding psychedelia. The sounds are lush and layered, fantastically atmospheric, the vocals sparse and minimal, no proper pop songs to be found anywhere, instead, The Terror delivers long sprawling dream-psych jams that are some of the best songs we've heard from these guys in ages. The opening tracks set the scene, pulsing electronics, woozy looped synth melodies, skittery drums, hazy vocals, the opener "Look... The Sun Is Rising" maybe the closest to modern Flaming Lips, and actual pop song structure, but even here, there's lots of jagged angular crunch, droned out synths, shimmering layers, everything washed out and hazy, the song leading directly into "Be Free, A Way", which is like an even more abstract extension of the opener, with a woozy soporific hook that will stick in your head forEVER, all over a lush landscape of synths and electronics, and murky pulsing rhythms. "Try To Explain" continues on in that drifting ethereal ephemeral psychedelic dream pop style, laying vocals over a lush bed of electronic pulsations, soaring symphonic arrangements and weird sound effects.
It's on "Your Lust" where the band seem to slough off the vestiges of pop that defined the opening few tracks, unfurling a heady sprawl of hypno rock electro-kraut grooviness, all sun dappled and woozy, eventually fading out into a lush and lovely coda of warble organ, and distorted chiming melodies.
And while there are moments of poppiness popping up throughout the record's remaining five tracks, those tracks seem to bleed together into one gorgeously lysergic sprawling songsuite. The rhythms minimal and motorik, the vocals wispy and ethereal, the sound often bursting into weirdly corrosive crumbles, or densely swirling buzz, blossoming into blown out shoegaze heaviness, before settling back into a twisted bit of swirling sci-fi kraut-pop drift, or some stripped down Can like minimal mesmer, but all wreathed in a constantly shifting cloud of effects and textures and disembodied voices, at one point the band slip into some hushed electronic creep, with falsetto vox, and lots of glitch and buzz, sounding a bit like Thom Yorke's solo record The Eraser, but things here are much weirder, the sound exploding into a noise drenched buzz pop, before devolving into the gorgeously abstract weirdo noise-pop prog of the closer "Always There In Our Hearts", which manages to be both poppy and impossibly catchy, as well as dense and claustrophobic, intense and super dramatic.
The whole record bleeds into one fantastic and lysergic whole, it's hard to pick out a single song, or even a single part. in fact we've yet to NOT listen to the whole record in a single sitting, the only thing that separates the songs for us is hearing a phrase, or part of a title, the record in many ways feels like one huge piece, an interconnected songsuite, and while with every listen, certain parts stick in our heads, certain melodies, specific sounds, even textures, or rhythms, we still just can't bring ourselves to not listen to the whole thing, all the way through, over and over and over.
(By the way, we're still waiting for the vinyl version of this to arrive, we're now told next week, supposedly.)
MPEG Stream: "Look... The Sun Is Rising"
MPEG Stream: "Be Free, A Way"
MPEG Stream: "Your Lust"
MPEG Stream: "The Terror"
MPEG Stream: "You Are Alone"

album cover FLAMING LIPS The Terror (Warner Bros.) 2lp 39.00
Finally, this recent aQ Record Of The Week, now available on vinyl, which includes a sidelong bonus track NOT on the cd, called "We Don't Control The Controls", an epic mash-up collage by Dan Deacon, where he takes the entirety of The Terror, chops it up, slices and dices all the sounds and songs, and somehow mashes it all back together into one gloriously dense, super psychedelic, Flaming Lipped electro-noise blowout! Folks who bought the cd might just have to get another copy to get their hands on this vinyl only fourth side! Here's our review of the rest of The Terror, the album proper, from when we listed the cd version two weeks ago on list #423...
We never really stopped digging the Flaming Lips. We'll always probably be partial to the early days, the chaotic, drug addled noise rock psych pop era of course, but even more so that transitional three album arc that marked the band's transition from fucked up underground legends to weirdo stadium rock popstars, Hit To Death In The Future Head, Transmissions From The Satellite Heart and Clouds Taste Metallic. With The Soft Bulletin, the band embraced their pop side, and it paid off, and we have to say we're pretty thrilled, that a band this weird, could end up being one of the most popular bands in the world. And it's pretty heartening, that even while they were crafting these crazy commercial records, they continued to be willfully difficult, and extremely experimental and unconventional. From crazy elaborate performances to bizarre limited releases (thumb drive in a human sized gummy skull!), they're essentially one of the only bands who never seemed to be corrupted by success, and who never let that success go to their heads, or really affect their music. In fact, if anything, the Lips seem to have peaked pop wise with the trilogy of The Soft Bulletin, Yoshimi Battles The Pink Robots and At War With The Mystics, and ever since, they seem to have been getting less and less commercial, like some sort of musical Benjamin Buttons. 2009's Embryonic was pretty weird, but The Terror trumps it big time.
Originally rumored to be a return to the band's old sound, The Terror instead finds the band slipping into a sort of abstract experimental almost krautrock sounding psychedelia. The sounds are lush and layered, fantastically atmospheric, the vocals sparse and minimal, no proper pop songs to be found anywhere, instead, The Terror delivers long sprawling dream-psych jams that are some of the best songs we've heard from these guys in ages. The opening tracks set the scene, pulsing electronics, woozy looped synth melodies, skittery drums, hazy vocals, the opener "Look... The Sun Is Rising" maybe the closest to modern Flaming Lips, and actual pop song structure, but even here, there's lots of jagged angular crunch, droned out synths, shimmering layers, everything washed out and hazy, the song leading directly into "Be Free, A Way", which is like an even more abstract extension of the opener, with a woozy soporific hook that will stick in your head forEVER, all over a lush landscape of synths and electronics, and murky pulsing rhythms. "Try To Explain" continues on in that drifting ethereal ephemeral psychedelic dream pop style, laying vocals over a lush bed of electronic pulsations, soaring symphonic arrangements and weird sound effects.
It's on "Your Lust" where the band seem to slough off the vestiges of pop that defined the opening few tracks, unfurling a heady sprawl of hypno rock electro-kraut grooviness, all sun dappled and woozy, eventually fading out into a lush and lovely coda of warble organ, and distorted chiming melodies.
And while there are moments of poppiness popping up throughout the record's remaining five tracks, those tracks seem to bleed together into one gorgeously lysergic sprawling songsuite. The rhythms minimal and motorik, the vocals wispy and ethereal, the sound often bursting into weirdly corrosive crumbles, or densely swirling buzz, blossoming into blown out shoegaze heaviness, before settling back into a twisted bit of swirling sci-fi kraut-pop drift, or some stripped down Can like minimal mesmer, but all wreathed in a constantly shifting cloud of effects and textures and disembodied voices, at one point the band slip into some hushed electronic creep, with falsetto vox, and lots of glitch and buzz, sounding a bit like Thom Yorke's solo record The Eraser, but things here are much weirder, the sound exploding into a noise drenched buzz pop, before devolving into the gorgeously abstract weirdo noise-pop prog of the closer "Always There In Our Hearts", which manages to be both poppy and impossibly catchy, as well as dense and claustrophobic, intense and super dramatic.
The whole record bleeds into one fantastic and lysergic whole, it's hard to pick out a single song, or even a single part. in fact we've yet to NOT listen to the whole record in a single sitting, the only thing that separates the songs for us is hearing a phrase, or part of a title, the record in many ways feels like one huge piece, an interconnected songsuite, and while with every listen, certain parts stick in our heads, certain melodies, specific sounds, even textures, or rhythms, we still just can't bring ourselves to not listen to the whole thing, all the way through, over and over and over.
MPEG Stream: "Look... The Sun Is Rising"
MPEG Stream: "Be Free, A Way"
MPEG Stream: "Your Lust"
MPEG Stream: "The Terror"
MPEG Stream: "You Are Alone"

album cover FLAMING LIPS Transmissions From The Satellite Heart (Warner Bros) cd 12.98

FLAMING LIPS Transmissions From The Satellite Heart (Warner Bros.) lp 26.00

MPEG Stream: "Turn It On"
MPEG Stream: "She Don't Use Jelly"
MPEG Stream: "Slow Nerve Action"

FLAMING LIPS Waitin' For a Superman (Warner Bros) 2cd 17.98
Two, three song cd singles packaged together as a set. Track one on both is the radio edit of the Lips' heart rending "Waitin' For a Superman" from the Soft Bulletin. The other two tracks are from the now out of print Zaireeka and are, you guessed it, meant to be played simulatenously.

album cover FLAMING LIPS Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots (Warner Bros.) cd 14.98
The Flaming Lips return with yet another gem and it's beginning to look as if they are only getting better with age. We used to think that about Tom Waits, Stereolab, and (some here think) Radiohead, but all those folks have released mediocre (perhaps bad?) records, whereas Flaming Lips' career-long consistency through 12 albums is pretty amazing. Certainly many of their indie rock, pre-Warner fans have long since abandoned their current efforts just as many who discovered them via their hit "She Don't Use Jelly" (or possibly more recently with "Waitin' For A Superman") probably don't find much to enjoy in their early drug addled, psychedelic bombast. But with such a continually evolving yet uncompromising sound, they're bound to alienate some. There's a striking resemblance on Yoshimi to the recent works of Radiohead, but then again there's definitely much that parallels the Lips' career with that of our faves from across the Atlantic. Like Radiohead, The Flaming Lips have chosen ever more increasing studio experimentation, combining electronic music elements with lush arrangements and cohesive album-oriented productions. But more significant perhaps is that Yoshimi, a semi-concept album, shares a similar paranoid and alienated angst that Radiohead has been honing these last several albums. But where as Radiohead takes a decidedly maudlin, Orwellian approach in their song writing, the Flaming Lips work in an absurdist, comedic fashion more akin to Philip K. Dick. "One More Robot / Sympathy 3000-21" could have been cut straight out of a P.K.D. story: "Unit three thousand twenty one is warming / makes a humming sound - when its circuits duplicate emotions - and a sense of coldness detaches as it tries to comfort your sadness..." All this arranged about as close to a Sade song as Coyne and the Lips can conceivably get (which I also see as a friendly jab at the sterile audiophile machinations of modern "soul".) The humanization of machines vs. humanity stripped of love and hate is the theme that's mulled over throughout. Most of the songs on the album are in direct reference to a painful breakup (either real or concocted) and the fictional battle between Yoshimi and the Pink Robots is more of a parable for struggling in the aftermath of having one's heart dashed to pieces. The two themes are intertwined on the album, but loosely enough so that you aren't forced into a Pink Floyd Wall of a concept album. While not as completely rife with hits as The Soft Bulletin, there's a lot to be warmed up to with Yoshimi. At first listen it seemed as though the Lips and Mercury Rev-ifier Dave Fridman had produced nothing but 45 minutes of studio wizardry and ear candy, but continual listens finds these songs opening up like a veritable flower blossom. "In the Morning of the Magicians" with its recurring, heart rending instrumental bridge will even bring a tear to the most desiccated of eyes. And "Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots" (Part 1, *not* part 2) will have you singing along in your best cracked falsetto soon enough. I imagine the bean counters at AOL/Time Warner had a hard time listening to this more than once, if at all, as they neglected to print up enough copies in the first run and now we - and stores everywhere I suppose - are struggling to find a distributor with remaining copies on hand. And we're not sure of the significance or if the title and her appearance on this record are mere coincidences or -gasp- something more, but AQ fave/crushworthy drummer/vocalist Yoshimi of the mighty Boredoms is a musical guest!!
RealAudio clip: "In the Morning of the Magicians"
RealAudio clip: "One More Robot / Sympathy 3000-21"
RealAudio clip: "Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots pt. 1"

FLAMING LIPS Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots (Warner Bros.) lp 13.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
Now available on vinyl! Here's the description again: The Flaming Lips return with yet another gem and it's beginning to look as if they are only getting better with age. We used to think that about Tom Waits, Stereolab, and (some here think) Radiohead, but all those folks have released mediocre (perhaps bad?) records, whereas Flaming Lips' career-long consistency through 12 albums is pretty amazing. Certainly many of their indie rock, pre-Warner fans have long since abandoned their current efforts just as many who discovered them via their hit "She Don't Use Jelly" (or possibly more recently with "Waitin' For A Superman") probably don't find much to enjoy in their early drug addled, psychedleic bombast. But with such a continually evolving yet uncompromising sound, they're bound to alienate some. There's a striking resemblance on Yoshimi to the recent works of Radiohead, but then again there's definitely much that parallels the Lips' career with that of our faves from across the Atlantic. Like Radiohead, The Flaming Lips have chosen ever more increasing studio experimentation, combining electronic music elements with lush arrangements and cohesive album-oriented productions. But more significant perhaps is that Yoshimi, a semi-concept album, shares a similar paranoid and alienated angst that Radiohead has been honing these last several albums. But where as Radiohead takes a decidedly maudlin Orwellian-like approach in their song writing, the Flaming Lips work in an absurdist, comedic fashion more akin to Philip K. Dick. "One More Robot / Sympathy 3000-21" could have been cut straight out of a P.K.D. story: "Unit three thousand twenty one is warming / makes a humming sound -- when its circuits duplicate emotions -- and a sense of coldness detaches as it tries to comfort your sadness..." All this arranged about as close to a Sade song as Coyne and the Lips can conceivably get (which I also see as a friendly jab at the sterile audiophile machinations of modern "soul".) The humanization of machines vs. humanity stripped of love and hate is the theme that's mulled over throughout. Most of the songs on the album are in direct reference to a painful breakup (either real or concocted) and the fictional battle between Yoshimi and the Pink Robots is more of a parable for struggling in the aftermath of having one's heart dashed to pieces. The two themes are intertwined on the album, but loosely enough so that you aren't forced into a Pink Floyd Wall of a concept album. While not as completely rife with hits as The Soft Bulletin, there's a lot to be warmed up to with Yoshimi. At first listen it seemed as though the Lips and Mercury Rev-ifier Dave Fridman had produced nothing but 45 minutes of studio wizardry and ear candy, but continual listens finds these songs opening up like a veritable flower blossom. "In the Morning of the Magicians" with its recurring, heart rending instrumental bridge will even bring a tear to the most desiccated of eyes. And "Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots" (Part 1, *not* part 2) will have you singing along in your best cracked falsetto soon enough. I imagine the bean counters at AOL/Time Warner had a hard time listening to this more than once, if at all, as they neglected to print up enough copies in the first run and now we -- and stores everywhere I suppose -- are struggling to find a distributor with remaining copies on hand. And we're not sure of the significance or if the title and her appearance on this record are mere coincidences or -gasp- something more, but AQ fave/crushworthy drummer/vocalist Yoshimi of the mighty Boredoms is a musical guest!!
RealAudio clip: "In the Morning of the Magicians"
RealAudio clip: "One More Robot / Sympathy 3000-21"
RealAudio clip: "Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots pt. 1"

album cover FLAMING LIPS Yoshimi Battles The Pink Robots (Warner Bros.) lp 26.00
One of SIX new Flaming Lips lps in the recently launched vinyl reissue program for everyone's favorite psychedelic weirdos turned mainstream indie rock heroes, 2002's Yoshimi Battles The Pink Robots, was the record that followed the group's massive breakthrough album, 1999's The Soft Bulletin. Yoshimi found the band returning with yet another gem which saw the band maturing, but seemingly only getting better with age. We used to think that about Tom Waits, Stereolab, and (some here think) Radiohead, but all those folks eventually released mediocre (perhaps bad?) records, whereas The Flaming Lips' career-long consistency through at the time 12 albums was pretty remarkable. Certainly many of their indie rock, pre-Warner fans abandoned the group well before this record, having soured on their current efforts, and probably just as many folks who discovered them via their hit "She Don't Use Jelly" (or possibly "Waitin' For A Superman") probably couldn't find much to enjoy in their early drug addled, psychedelic bombast. But with such a continually evolving yet uncompromising sound, they're bound to alienate some. There's a striking resemblance on Yoshimi to the recent works of Radiohead, but then again there's definitely much that parallels the Lips' career with that of our faves from across the Atlantic. Like Radiohead, The Flaming Lips have chosen ever more increasing studio experimentation, combining electronic music elements with lush arrangements and cohesive album-oriented productions. But more significant perhaps is that Yoshimi, a semi-concept album, shares a similar paranoid and alienated angst that Radiohead has been honing these last several albums. But where as Radiohead takes a decidedly maudlin, Orwellian approach in their song writing, the Flaming Lips work in an absurdist, comedic fashion more akin to Philip K. Dick. "One More Robot / Sympathy 3000-21" could have been cut straight out of a P.K.D. story: "Unit three thousand twenty one is warming / makes a humming sound - when its circuits duplicate emotions - and a sense of coldness detaches as it tries to comfort your sadness..." All this arranged about as close to a Sade song as Coyne and the Lips can conceivably get (which we also see as a friendly jab at the sterile audiophile machinations of modern "soul".) The humanization of machines vs. humanity stripped of love and hate is the theme that's mulled over throughout. Most of the songs on the album are in direct reference to a painful breakup (either real or concocted) and the fictional battle between Yoshimi and the Pink Robots is more of a parable for struggling in the aftermath of having one's heart dashed to pieces. The two themes are intertwined on the album, but loosely enough so that you aren't forced into a Pink Floyd Wall of a concept album. While not as completely rife with hits as The Soft Bulletin, there's a lot to be warmed up to with Yoshimi. At first listen it seemed as though the Lips and Mercury Rev-ifier Dave Fridman had produced nothing but 45 minutes of studio wizardry and ear candy, but continual listens finds these songs opening up like a veritable flower blossom. "In the Morning of the Magicians" with its recurring, heart rending instrumental bridge will even bring a tear to the most desiccated of eyes. And "Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots" (Part 1, *not* part 2) will have you singing along in your best cracked falsetto soon enough. We imagine the bean counters at AOL/Time Warner had a hard time listening to this more than once, if at all, as they neglected to print up enough copies for the first run, and we're not sure of the significance or if the title and her appearance on this record are mere coincidences or -gasp- something more, but AQ fave/crushworthy drummer/vocalist Yoshimi of the mighty Boredoms was a musical guest!!
MPEG Stream: "In the Morning of the Magicians"
MPEG Stream: "One More Robot / Sympathy 3000-21"
MPEG Stream: "Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots pt. 1"

album cover FLAMING LIPS Yoshimi Battles The Pink Robots 5.1 (Warner) dvd + cd 23.00
Normally we scoff at the ongoing fleecing of music lovers by re-releasing albums with a DVD of bonus crap forcing fans to buy the album twice. And we're not sure why this Flaming Lips DVD couldn't have just been released by itself, but it wasn't, so once again, fans are faced with the choice of buying the record again, or missing out. Thankfully, the stuff on the DVD is actually pretty great, so it might be worth getting rid of your old Yoshimi and picking up this new one. The cd is virtually unchanged, and the full review is below. The DVD contains the full album, but mixed in 5.1 surround sound. Two different videos for "Do You Realize?", the making of "Do You Realize?", "Yoshimi Battles The Pink Robots Pt. 1" video, a making of the "Yoshimi" video, "Fight Test" video, "Phoebe Battles The Pink Robots" video, a trailer for the Flaming Lips upcoming Christmas On Mars movie (that looks deliciously low budget), and a making of this here DVD. Also there are two animated DVD-Rom tracks, and 6 unreleased tracks (4 alternate versions and two new tracks). There's also a weird sort of trippy video jukebox. Hard to know what was all on there because the DVD was sort of hard to navigate, but it's pretty jam packed with goodies that most Flaming Lips fans will not want to be without. Now here's what we had to say about the record itself:
The Flaming Lips return with yet another gem and it's beginning to look as if they are only getting better with age. We used to think that about Tom Waits, Stereolab, and (some here think) Radiohead, but all those folks have released mediocre (perhaps bad?) records, whereas Flaming Lips' career-long consistency through 12 albums is pretty amazing. Certainly many of their indie rock, pre-Warner fans have long since abandoned their current efforts just as many who discovered them via their hit "She Don't Use Jelly" (or possibly more recently with "Waitin' For A Superman") probably don't find much to enjoy in their early drug addled, psychedleic bombast. But with such a continually evolving yet uncompromising sound, they're bound to alienate some. There's a striking resemblance on Yoshimi to the recent works of Radiohead, but then again there's definitely much that parallels the Lips' career with that of our faves from across the Atlantic. Like Radiohead, The Flaming Lips have chosen ever more increasing studio experimentation, combining electronic music elements with lush arrangements and cohesive album-oriented productions. But more significant perhaps is that Yoshimi, a semi-concept album, shares a similar paranoid and alienated angst that Radiohead has been honing these last several albums. But where as Radiohead takes a decidedly maudlin Orwellian-like approach in their song writing, the Flaming Lips work in an absurdist, comedic fashion more akin to Philip K. Dick. "One More Robot / Sympathy 3000-21" could have been cut straight out of a P.K.D. story: "Unit three thousand twenty one is warming / makes a humming sound -- when its circuits duplicate emotions -- and a sense of coldness detaches as it tries to comfort your sadness..." All this arranged about as close to a Sade song as Coyne and the Lips can conceivably get (which I also see as a friendly jab at the sterile audiophile machinations of modern "soul".) The humanization of machines vs. humanity stripped of love and hate is the theme that's mulled over throughout. Most of the songs on the album are in direct reference to a painful breakup (either real or concocted) and the fictional battle between Yoshimi and the Pink Robots is more of a parable for struggling in the aftermath of having one's heart dashed to pieces. The two themes are intertwined on the album, but loosely enough so that you aren't forced into a Pink Floyd Wall of a concept album. While not as completely rife with hits as The Soft Bulletin, there's a lot to warm up to with Yoshimi. At first listen it seemed as though the Lips and Mercury Rev-ifier Dave Fridman had produced nothing but 45 minutes of studio wizardry and ear candy, but continual listens finds these songs opening up like a veritable flower blossom. "In the Morning of the Magicians" with its recurring, heart rending instrumental bridge will even bring a tear to the most desiccated of eyes. And "Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots" (Part 1, *not* part 2) will have you singing along in your best cracked falsetto soon enough. We're not sure of the significance or if the title and her appearance on this record are mere coincidences or -gasp- something more, but AQ fave/crushworthy drummer/vocalist Yoshimi of the mighty Boredoms is a musical guest!!
MPEG Stream: "In the Morning of the Magicians"
MPEG Stream: "One More Robot / Sympathy 3000-21"
MPEG Stream: "Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots pt. 1"

album cover FLAMING LIPS Zaireeka (Warner Bros) 4cd 23.00
"Warning: This is a unique recording. These 8 compositions are to be played using as many as four compact disc players, and have synchronized start times. This recording also contains frequencies not normally heard on commercial recordings and on rare occasion has caused the listener to become disoriented."
That's right, four cds meant to be played simultaneously, that nonetheless sound engrossing and interesting one by one. That Warner Bros saw fit to release this wonderful experiment in sonic collage is amazing. Then it went out of print for a while, so what's even MORE amazing is that Warner Bros. decided to repress it, again!!
Buy this and conduct your own "boombox experiment"...
MPEG Stream: "Riding To Work In The Year 2025 (Your Invisible Now)"
MPEG Stream: "Thirty-Five Thousand Feet Of Despair"
MPEG Stream: "Big Ol' Bug Is The New Baby Now"

FLAMING LIPS Zaireeka (Warner Bros.) 4lp 79.00
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.

album cover FLAMING LIPS / BRADLEY BEESLEY The Fearless Freaks: The Wondrously Improbable Story Of The Flaming Lips (Shout) dvd 29.00
Wow. We mean WOW! Haven't watched the whole movie but from what we've seen already, HOLY CRAP! How many bands are lucky enough to have a next door neighbor / past pal who just happens to be an experimental film maker, and who just happens to have filmed everything for the last decade, videos, parties, shows, birthdays, EVERYTHING. This is a delirious travelogue through the strange life of the Flaming Lips, from their beginnings as a ramshackle psych noise band, to their re-invention as pop experimentalists to their Grammy and beyond! All filmed in that cool guerilla, fucked-with-film-stock, overexposed / underexposed, short attention span style we've come to equate with the Lips through their videos. Fear not though. There's plenty of intense emotional stuff going on beneath the visual fireworks. Highlights include a particularly brutal scene involving drummer Steven Drozd shooting up while he discusses his addiction (which the band chose to address together instead of kicking him out of the band), and another scene wherein main Lip Wayne visits his older brother who lives in the bad part of town and discusses his jailtime as well as his involvement in local crime. Plus loads of goofy fun, wild rocking and stuff that makes no sense at all but is fun nonetheless, like the scene in which Wayne and two kids re-enact a robbery at the Long John Silver's where Wayne used to work or the scene where Wayne helps his mom repair the rain gutters! Tons of amazing footage, old class photos, many many embarassing haircuts, loads of amazing music, all presented in a suitably tripped out psychedelic framework. Bonus features include live clips, slide shows, bloopers, deleted scenes, outtakes and really funny commentary from both the director and the band. Recommended, already.

FLAMING LIPS, THE 7 Skies H3 (Warner Bros.) lp 29.00
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.

album cover FLAMING LIPS, THE And Heady Fwends (Warner Brothers) cd 12.98
Of all the hundreds of super limited Record Store Day releases this year, the double lp superstar collaboration from the Flaming Lips and their 'Fwends' was probably THEE most anticipated one of all, and as might have been expected, those sold out in a heartbeat. But now it's available again, this time as a less limited cd, with different cover art. And yeah, as the title suggests, this is indeed a collection of collaborations, but VERY unlikely ones, with all sorts of other musicians, very few of which we would imagine would normally end up in the same orbit as the Lips. But much has changed over the last couple decades, the band that was once a sloppy chaotic drug rock mess and who toured with bands like the Butthole Surfers, has become one of the biggest bands in the world, and thus, one might not be as surprised to see the list of collaborators: Ke$ha, Biz Markie, Bon Iver, Edward Sharpe And The Magnetic Zeros, Prefuse 73, Tame Impala, My Morning Jacket, Nick Cave, Lightning Bolt, Yoko Ono, Neon Indian, Erykah Badu, New Fumes, Chris Martin of Coldplay. Weird, huh?
And as much as we want to hate on the modern version of the Lips, and doubt their relevance as a band, all it takes is an earful of their warped psychedelic pop, and we realize that maybe not so much has changed after all. Cuz goddamn if we're not sort of loving this record. The sounds are all over the map, but pretty much always sound like the Flaming Lips, from weird noise drenched electro-pop to drum machine driven psychedelia, from lush orchestral almost choral sounding dreamfolk to rad tripped out electronic skitter and squelch, from fuzzed out falsetto vocal-ed psychedelic dreaminess to super distorted doomy dirgey fuzzy noisepop and even some warm swirly synth heavy new wave.
We had already heard their Lightning Bolt collab, and it's pretty much THEE jam here, heavy and heady, noisy and weird as fuck, the perfect mix of the two bands' sounds, dreamy and woozy one second, wild and drum heavy and chaotic the next, but then the Yoko Ono track is pretty rad too, trippy and abstract, tribal, with plenty of fuzz and buzz and crunch, weird effects, Ono mostly shouting "Do It" over the droned out psychedelic dirgery beneath, and Erykah Badu's Flaming Lips-ed version of "The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face" becomes creepy and doomy and super haunting, and heck, even the Chris Martin track is pretty gorgeous too, elegiac, a haunting softly psychedelic ballad that sounds more like the Lips than Coldplay, but manages again to fuse the best of both bands. Needless to say, this is definitely recommended. For new fans and even skeptical old fans like us.
MPEG Stream: "I'm Working At NASA On Acid (With Lightning Bolt)"
MPEG Stream: "Do It (With Yoko Ono / Plastic Ono Band)"
MPEG Stream: "The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face (With Erykah Badu)"

album cover FLAMING LIPS, THE And Heady Fwends (Warner Brothers) 2lp 42.00
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
Of all the hundreds of Record Store Day releases this was probably THEE most anticipated one of all, a sprawling collaborative double lp, featuring a handful of VERY unlikely collaborations with all sorts of other musicians, very few of which we would imagine would normally end up in the same orbit as the Lips. But much has changed, the band that was once a sloppy chaotic drug rock mess, who toured with bands like the Butthole Surfers, has become one of the biggest bands in the world, and thus, one might not be as surprised to see the list of collaborators: Ke$ha, Biz Markie, Bon Iver, Edward Sharpe And The Magnetic Zeros, Prefuse 73, Tame Impala, My Morning Jacket, Nick Cave, Lightning Bolt, Yoko Ono, Neon Indian, Erykah Badu, New Fumes, Chris Martin of Coldplay. Weird huh? But as much as we want to hate on the Lips, and doubt their relevance as a band, all it takes is an earful of their warped psychedelic pop, and we realized that maybe not so much has changed after all. We won't go into too much detail with this, as it was a Record Store Day release, and thus is extremely limited, and odds are once this current batch disappears it may be gone for good, but goddamn if we're not sort of loving this record. The sounds are all over the map, but pretty much always sound like the Flaming Lips, from weird noise drenched electro-pop to drum machine driven psychedelia, from lush orchestral almost choral sounding dreamfolk to rad tripped out electronic skitter and squelch, from fuzzed out falsetto vocal-ed psychedelic dreaminess to super distorted doomy dirgey fuzzy noisepop and even some warm swirly synth heavy new wave.
We had already heard their Lightning Bolt collab, and it's pretty much THEE jam here, heavy and heady, noisy and weird as fuck, the perfect mix of the two bands' sounds, dreamy and woozy one second, wild and drum heavy and chaotic the next, but then the Yoko Ono track is pretty rad too, trippy and abstract, tribal, with plenty of fuzz and buzz and crunch, weird effects, Ono mostly shouting "Do It" over the droned out psychedelic dirgery beneath, and Erykah Badu's Flaming Lips-ed version of "The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face" becomes creepy and doomy and super haunting, and heck, even the Chris Martin track is pretty gorgeous too, elegiac, a haunting softly psychedelic ballad that sounds more like the Lips than Coldplay, but manages again to fuse the best of both bands. Needless to say, this is definitely recommended. For new fans and even skeptical old fans like us.
Limited to 10,000 copies (!!), but in Flaming Lips numbers, that still basically means that these will be gone for good in no time.
MPEG Stream: "I'm Working At NASA On Acid (With Lightning Bolt)"
MPEG Stream: "Do It (With Yoko Ono / Plastic Ono Band)"
MPEG Stream: "The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face (With Erykah Badu)"

album cover FLAMING LIPS, THE Christmas On Mars (Warner Bros.) cd+dvd 25.00
We had been holding off on reviewing this until someone here had actually watched the Flaming Lips movie, but it's been so busy around here we haven't had time. And since most Flaming Lips fans are gonna want this no matter what, and folks who have yet to discover the joys of the Lips, would most likely be better off starting a little further back in their catalog, we figured what the heck, let's review the record, the score to the movie, and give a brief synopsis of the movie, just so folks can actually buy it and check it out for themselves.
So the record, is not a NEW Flaming Lips record, in fact it's not even a proper Flaming Lips record, as mentioned above it's the score to the film of the same name, the one the band has been working on for close to a decade. So there's no big drums, none of Wayne Coyne's wavery vocalizing, no lush popscapes or BIG hooks, but the thing is, with all of those critical Lips elements removed, the band manage to still make Christmas On Mars sound like a Flaming Lips record, albeit a stripped down sort of ambient one.
But heck, remember Zaireeka? The 4 disc set that had the various tracks broken down and spread out over the various discs so to hear the complete songs you had to have 4 stereos and play them all simultaneously? Well, in some ways this almost sounds like ONE disc from Zaireeka, like the backgrounds for proper Lips pop songs. haunting disembodied voices, lush harps and zithers, faux strings, creepy orchestrations, strange sound effects, choirs, shimmering drones, but all shot through with a little bit of Christmas, be it a melody here, or an instrument there. Even removed from the visuals, this plays like some super avant, outsider Christmas record, which, it sort of is. So yeah, recommended for open minded fans of the band, and for folks into space-y (holiday) weirdness, or wonderfully creepy film scores like that Bernard Hermann Brave New World disc we listed awhile back.
But that's not all. Both the cd and the lp version (which has a different name for some reason) contain a dvd containing the film Christmas On Mars, a sort of updated but still WAY low budget Plan 9 From Outerspace, starring the bands and lots of their friends. What little we've seen looks really fun, and pretty silly, and definitely demented, again, movie buffs might not love it (movie buffs into kitsch and so-bad-they're-good movies might though) but fans will go nuts for it. The trailer is amazing, super stylized and very very strange, definitely has us wanting to see it bad. One of these days. But for now, check it out. Lips fans, this is essential obviously, the rest of you, depends on how you feel about the band and their music, or how you feel about a green alien with antennae who saves Christmas.
The lp, titled Once Beyond Hopelessness, not only contains the same music as the cd, and the movie on dvd, it also includes a BONUS 7" with exclusive music NOT on the cd!
MPEG Stream: "Once Beyond Hopelessness"
MPEG Stream: "In Excelsior Vagianlistic"
MPEG Stream: "Space Bible With Volume Lumps"

album cover FLAMING LIPS, THE Dark Side Of The Moon (Warner Bros. ) cd 14.98
Whenever a cover song (let alone a whole cover album!) comes through our doors, we ask, "Did this really need to be covered?" or perhaps more importantly, "Did this really need to be released?!" I mean, yeah, it's super fun to figure out and play someone else's awesome song, and can also be super fun to witness in the live setting like in an encore or something, but to actually commit it to tape or vinyl or cd? Hmmmm. That said, we know people will never stop doin' it, and some folks will for sure do it better than others. Well, in this particular case, can you really think of anyone more equipped to cover the ENTIRE Dark Side Of The Moon than the Flaming Lips?! Nope, we can't either. And apparently live this is some sort of fantastical spectacle, obviously. So yeah, a handful of these tracks sound right at home in the able hands of the Flaming Lips, just getting a bit more twisted and psychedelic, which of course we're totally not opposed to. Peaches and Henry Rollins guest on a few tracks, which we're not so keen on, but heck, it still sounds like it was a lot of fun.
Those tracks that do work though are pretty dang incredible, wild and incendiary and heavy and moody and blissful and so so psychedelic... Lips fans will definitely want this, Pink Floyd fans MIGHT, everyone else should give the sound samples a listen and decide for themselves...
MPEG Stream: "Speak To Me / Breathe (feat. Peaches & Henry Rollins)"
MPEG Stream: "Us And Them (feat. Henry Rollins)"
MPEG Stream: "Any Color You Like"

FLAMING LIPS, THE In A Priest Driven Ambulance (Plain Recordings) lp 17.98
Pink vinyl.

album cover FLAMING LIPS, THE Late Night Tales (Azuli) cd 17.98
For their installment in Azuli Records' Late Night Tales series, Wayne Coyne & Co. have apparently rummaged through their personal record collections and picked out eighteen of their faves. It's somewhat perplexingly and a tiny bit disappointing though 'cause there aren't really any big surprises nor any odd obscurities. The biggest surprise is in just how safe a selection it is -- sorta like one of those old 'As Seen On TV! K-Tel Greatest Hits' compilations. Okay, maybe it's not *that* predictable or mainstream, but see for yourself... Bjork, Radiohead, Nick Drake, Sebadoh, Chemical Brothers, Chris Bell, Aphex Twin, Brian Eno, Psychedelic Furs, Chameleons, Love And Rockets, Roxy Music, Lush, Miles Davis, Mice Parade, Alfie, Faust and 10CC! While this comp does stir up fond memories of those good ol' songs, we might've expected the Lips' to take this opportunity to share some more off-the-radar listening treats by including a couple of challenging curve balls in the mix. In fact, the only things here that comes remotely close to curve balls are Faust's "It's A Bit Of A Pain" and 10CC's "I'm Not In Love". That said, 'Lips fans will surely welcome the band's own contribution to the lot which appears halfway through the album. It's their cover of The White Stripes' tune "Seven Nation Army" (apparently this is the exclusive release of this song on cd, but you might also be able to find it on an unrelated limited edition 7"). A final added bonus on this volume of the Late Night Tales series is the second of five clips from multi-faceted Scotsman David Shrigley's Bits And Bobs.
MPEG Stream: FLAMING LIPS "Seven Nation Army"
MPEG Stream: FAUST "It's A Bit Of A Pain"

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