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IMPORTANT (Please read to avoid confusion):
Some items below may be tagged with a bold, red, all-caps "out of print/unavailable" notice. This does NOT mean that all other items not so tagged are, in fact, in stock -- or for that matter, in print and available, though there's a good chance they are. Some folks get confused on this point, and we can see why, so please read this for further clarification and other important before-you-order information. Unlike some mailorder websites, we don't have an electronic inventory system linked to our site, so you can't be sure of what we actually have or don't have in stock at any given moment without asking us -- please email our mailorder department for availability status -- or better yet, just go ahead and place your order using our shopping cart function and we'll get back to you with the status of each item. If you have general non-mailorder questions, email the store.


album cover SOULEYMAN, OMAR Highway To Hassake: Folk & Pop Sounds Of Syria (Sublime Frequencies) 2lp 30.00
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
FINALLY AVAILABLE ON VINYL, and super limited, bound to sell out and go out of print before you know it...
The ever-reliable Sublime Frequencies label opens our ears to new frontiers of amazing sounds, AGAIN. "World music" isn't just what Putumayo puts out, y'know. Any adventurous music-fan should by now know to pick up each and every Sublime Frequencies release as they appear, you won't be disappointed. This latest release presents some "Folk And Pop Sounds Of Syria" in the form of a "best-of" collection of tunes by one Omar Souleyman, selected (and explicated in the liner notes) by AQ pal Mark Gergis (of Porest, Neung Phak, Mono Pause). Mark was the compiler of previous Sublime Freq faves like Choubi Choubi, Molam: Thai Country Groove, and Cambodian Cassette Archives. Already we hope you're eager to hear this disc, which features a variety of traditional folk forms from Souleyman's homeland and nearby countries supercharged with synth, the rapid fire results sounding something like a Middle Eastern version of Aavikko, almost. It'll make you sweat just listening to it. This stuff simply shreds. And when it's more mellowed-out, Souleyman's music is gorgeous too.
Now, we don't usually like to quote label press-releases whole-hog, but Sublime Frequencies has provided a lot of factual info on Souleyman and his music that any potential purchaser will find of interest, and so rather than paraphrase, here's what they said about this, it should certainly pique your curiosity all the more (though we'll tell you right now without further ado, GET THIS):
"Omar Souleyman is a Syrian musical legend. Since 1994, he and his musicians have emerged as a staple of folk-pop throughout Syria, but until now they have remained little known outside of the country. To date, they have issued more than five-hundred studio and live-recorded cassette albums which are easily spotted in the shops of any Syrian city. Born in rural northeastern Syria, he began his musical career in 1994 with a small group of local collaborators that remain with him today. The myriad musical traditions of the region are evident in their music. Here, classical Arabic mawal-style vocalization gives way to high-octane Syrian dabke (the regional folkloric dance and party music), Iraqi choubi and a host of Arabic, Kurdish and Turkish styles, among others. This amalgamation is truly the sound of Syria. The music often has an overdriven sound consisting of phase-shifted Arabic keyboard solos and frantic rhythms. At breakneck speeds, these shrill Syrian electronics play out like forbidden Morse-code, but the moods swing from coarse and urgent to dirgy and contemplative in the rugged anthems that comprise Souleyman's repertoire. Oud, reeds, baglama saz, accompanying vocals and percussion fill out the sound from track to track. Mahmoud Harbi is a long-time collaborator and the man responsible for much of the poetry sung by Souleyman. Together, they commonly perform the "Ataba," a traditional form of folk poetry used in Dabke. On stage, Harbi chain smokes cigarettes while standing shoulder to shoulder with Souleyman, periodically leaning over to whisper the material into his ear. Acting as a conduit, Souleyman struts into the audience with urgency, vocalizing the prose in song before returning for the next verse. Souleyman's first hit in Syria was "Jani" (1996) which gained cassette-kiosk infamy and brought him recognition throughout the country. Sublime Frequencies is honored to present the Western debut of Omar Souleyman with this retrospective disc of studio and live recordings spanning 12 years of his career, culled from cassettes recorded between 1994 and 2006. This collection offers a rare glimpse into Syrian street-level folk-pop and Dabke - a phenomena seldom heard in the West, not previously deemed serious enough for export by the Syrians and rarely, if ever, included on the import agenda of worldwide academic musical committees."
Got it? Get it. Recommended!
MPEG Stream: "Leh Jani"
MPEG Stream: "Atabat"
MPEG Stream: "Don't Wear Black, Green Suits You Better"

album cover SOULEYMAN, OMAR Jazeera Nights: Folk And Pop Sounds Of Syria (Sublime Frequencies) cd 16.98
We'll admit, we're a sucker for Sublime Frequencies, they've yet to release a record that didn't totally blow our minds. Which says as much about SF's curating as it does about the unheard music worldwide. Treasures everywhere, amazing and passionate and personal and far out sounds, being made in homes and yards, on street corners, in bars, at picnics and parties, not conceived for public consumption, meant for a small audience, and often for a specific purpose, getting a glimpse into these magical musical moments is what Sublime Frequencies is all about, and we feel lucky to get to experience these sounds.
This is the third record from Omar Souleyman on Sublime Frequencies, and just might be the best one yet, which is saying A LOT. A collection of live recordings culled from nearly 15 years worth of cassettes, these tracks are incredible, energetic, passionate, so full of life, effusive and emotional, funky and celebratory, and to Western ears, seriously far out. There's almost a wild Bollywood vibe (even though this is from the Middle East, not India), in the vocals, and the rhythms, and with the crazy tangled synthesizer melodies, the propulsive drumming, and Souleyman's distorted, wailed vocal delivery, it all sounds just so perfect, even listening to this music on record, it sounds sweaty and exhausting and cathartic, it's easy to imagine a big crowd of people dancing and bouncing along, freed from all cares and concerns letting the music just carry them away.
Like all Sublime Frequencies releases, the liner notes offer up so much information, on Souleyman, his life, the history of Syria, on Syrian folk music, etc, but even without all that info, if it's just about the music, these are some of the most amazing sounds you'll ever hear. Frantic Eastern melodies, frenetic percussion, analog synths wound around Souleyman's vocals, this is party music, dance music, but not like party or dance music the way we normally think about it. The music of Souleyman is transcendent, spiritual, psychedelic, transformative, a folk pop known as Dabke, rarely heard in the West, perhaps not at all if it wasn't for Sublime Frequencies, and we'd imagine these sounds might be overwhelming for casual world music listeners, it is after all wild and frantic and relentless, the melodies complex and twisted and tangled, there are some moments that verge on folky for sure, the final track is a gorgeous haunting lament, just vocals and buzzing synthesizers, but barring that track, even on the folkier jams, those strange synths, the unique melodies, the repetitive tranced out rhythms, those all transform Souleyman's folk into something much more, and in most cases, it's not long before the band explodes into yet another super intense sweat soaked psychedelic Syrian folk pop workout. So great!
MPEG Stream: "Hafer Gabrak Bidi (I Will Dig Your Grave With My Hands)"
MPEG Stream: "Ala Il Hanash Madgouga (The Bedouin Tattoo)"
MPEG Stream: "Hot Il Khanjar Bi Gleibi (Stab My Heart)"
MPEG Stream: "Kell Il Banat Inkhatban (All The Girls Are Engaged)"

album cover SOULEYMAN, OMAR Leh Jani (Sham Palace) 2lp 27.00
As if the Sublime Frequencies label wasn't prolific enough, one of the SF head honchos, our pal Mark Gergis, has now launched his OWN similar label, Sham Palace. Which has chosen as its first release, this reissue of a classic recording from beloved Syrian singer Omar Souleyman, a single song 30 minutes long! Originally released as a cassette in Syria, this reissue finds that single sprawling Souleyman groove, an edit of which was included on Souleyman's Sublime Frequencies debut Highway To Hassake, presented in its entirety, taking up two sides of vinyl. It's a killer track recorded live in one take, to emulate the vibe of the actual performance, without the distractions of the recording studio, and like other Souleyman jams, it's a scorcher, his vocals in fine form, over a wild tangled background of stuttering, pounding programed beats, buzzing synths and incredible saz melodies (the guy who plays saz is a serious shredder!). It's difficult to imagine the band keeping up the intensity for 30 minutes, but they never flag, the sound effusive and celebratory, the sort of sound that would incite and instant dance party (believe us, we saw it happen here, hipster wallflowers could not resist!), it stands up as one of his best most certainly, which is saying something considering how great pretty much everything we've heard from him is.
That would be enough, but there's a whole second lp, with two more tracks, the first, a lengthy introduction wed to another groover, this one more laid back and swoonsome, the vibe is more late night wind down, the band still killing it, but all stretched out and languid, sultry and surprising serene, while impossibly retaining much of the usual energy. And then finishing off with an unreleased track, which returns things to their proper order, Souleyman and band kicking it up a notch and once again unfurling some incredible grooves, wild and funky, hypnotic and tranced out, totally mesmerizing and utterly irresistible.

SOULREAPER Written In Blood (Nuclear Blast) cd 15.98
Debut disc from the new band of ex-Dissection rhythm guitarist player Johan Norman, also featuring final Dissection drummer Tobias Kellgren. Dissection, as you may know, was the ultimate Swedish death/black metal band of the '90s (well, next to At The Gates), combining melody, speed, and a palpable sense of dangerous evil like none other. Unfortunately, Dissection met its demise after two albums when one member went to jail for murder! But his colleagues have formed Soulreaper (named after a Dissection song) to continue the tradition (as well as that of Morbid Angel, Slayer, etc.). Soulreaper even covers a song by pre-Dissection demo band Satanized.

album cover SOULS ON BOARD s/t (The Tapeworm) cassette 7.98
Another mysterious release from upstart UK tape label The Tapeworm, one of FOUR new releases this time around (all reviewed on this week's list). So who are Souls On Board? Well, like lots of the stuff The Tapeworm releases, it's really hard to tell, the recordings sound live, plenty of crowd sounds, shuffling feet, room noise, tape hiss, according to the minimal liner notes, the sounds were "recorded in Tangiers, Mallorca, London, Lisbon, Lanzarote and other unknown locations." Guests include Wire guitarist Bruce Gilbert, as well as Northwestern noisenik Daniel Menche, each contributing something subtle to the Souls' smoldering buzz drone minimalism. Hushed barely there static, deep pulsing swells, smears of gristly hiss, bumps and clunks and clanks smoothed out into rugged textures, thick and layered and dense, and quite mesmerizing. With a vibe and sound that recalls the antique obfuscations of Philip Jeck, or the warm pixelated sonic Gauze of Tim Hecker, but way more abstract, but that's really only the first lengthy track. After that, there's some intercepted conversations, some intense high end tones, some strange abstract field recordings, but soon those too give way to more of that washed out creepiness, peppered with voices, strange electronic glitches, and plenty of soft focus noisiness.
The flipside offers up some more dark minimal throb and pulse and buzz, beginning as a super hushed throb, laced with found sounds, and a patina of static, before getting all rhythmic, then noisy, a sort of Chain Reaction / Pan Sonic / Wolf Eyes mash up. Dark and heavy and haunting and droney and a little bit noisy, quite cool for sure.
LIMITED TO ONLY 250 COPIES!!!!

album cover SOUND ASLEEP Black Top Wash (self-released) cd-r 9.98
Sound Asleep (aka Conor Vincent Ghilarducci) has crafted some really really cool electronic instrumental tracks for his debut release Black Top Wash. A broad range of kick-ass, very tactile sounds. Tight rhythm programming. This baker's dozen tracks are in turn ominous, witty and pretty. Ghilarducci skillfully plays with texture in novel ways just as he plays with words in his song titles such as "Abdominal Snowman". His chimey and raindroplet-y melodic cycles step lightly amid the deeep slippery almost digeridoo-ish basslines. For a visual equivalent imagine a big furry monster settling for supper with his wee pals Mouse and Electric Eel while an army of robotic mosquitoes buzz about overhead. Did we mention? Really really cool!
MPEG Stream: "Nostril Smog Test"
MPEG Stream: "Abdominal Snowman"

album cover SOUND ASLEEP Dead Things (self-released) cd-r 9.98
Here's the second cd-r release from this fine Bay Area electronic artist. The eight instrumental tracks on Dead Things are somewhat darker and dreamier than those of his debut Black Top Wash from 2005. Sound Asleep aka Conor Vincent Ghilarducci does what he does exceptionally well, possessing an impressive grasp of layered textures and moody atmospheres. Check it out!
MPEG Stream: "Sleeveless"
MPEG Stream: "Burnt Plastic"

album cover SOUND CARTOGRAPHY Volume One (Nancy Jo / Warm Bath) lp 11.98
From the same label that brought us that amazing Otesanek record from a while back comes this, the first lp in a series called Sound Cartography, which, as the label helpfully explains is:
"Concerned with the investigation of how individuals react when presented with unfamiliar material. Using a linear sequence, each consecutive participant ultimately determines the structure & feel of the record, taking cues from the previous submissions." Sounds cool so far. So when you figure in the fact that the participants include members of Iron Lung, Pig Heart Transplant, Brainoil, Lana Dagales, Running For Cover and Cages, you might be getting an idea of what sort of heavy sonic punishment you're in for, but odds are, you'd be wrong.
While this record is heavy and punishing, it's not metal, or grind, or power violence, there are no drums, if there are guitars, they're used in very un-guitar-like ways, if anything, it's a drone record, albeit a particularly malevolent drone record, with deep swells of cymbal shimmer, rumbling low end buzz, blackened and blurred thrum, all underpinning a haunting spoken word vocal, and laced with a grinding layer of gnarled FX laden crunch, way down in the mix, streaks of glitch, a bit of clatter, building to a burst of abstract ambient near power violence before giving way to an extended bit of super spare, minimal drift, peppered with bits of plinked piano, detuned steel string buzz and hysterically howled invective.
The flipside offers up more of the same, another swirling abstract dronescape, grim spoken vocals, pulsing distorted soft noise, thick swells of sound, barely there pulse like rhythms, reverbed crunch and clatter, slightly sci-fi sounding, again finally slipping into a gorgeous sprawl of hushed drones and ominous whispers, laced with bits of effected dubbed out glitch.
Gorgeous packaging, hand screened two color (black and metallic silver) chipboard fold over jackets, printed on both sides, pressed on thick vinyl, and LIMITED TO 300 COPIES.

SOUND COLLECTOR #8 (subtitled The Pink/Bearded Man Issue) mag 7.50
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
Laris Kreslins and Fred Cisterna deliver another thick and satisfyin' volume of their Sound Collector magazine. Who and what's in this issue? Alan Bishop of Sun City Girls, Eric Dolphy, Grandmaster Flash, Slowdive, Francoiz Breut and Dominique A plus and illustration by Daniel Johnston. With the exception of the fantastic full color section of photos from the rock'n'roll girls' camp, all photos and text are in a lovely shade of magenta! Includes a bonus 17-track compilation cd featuring the likes of Iron & Wine, Stephen Basho-Junghans, Francoiz Breut, Zammuto, and Calla.

SOUND COLLECTOR issue #4 magazine 5.00
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
Yay! A new issue of one of our favorite 'zines. We just got it in, so we have yet to dig into its pages in depth, but looking through it I've already noted pieces on This Heat, U.S. Maple, Harry Partch, and Captain Beefheart that I want to read...plus what look to be intriguing features on Willie Winant, David S. Ware, Beulah and more. An interesting mix of avant-music and indie rock content contained within 95 graphically nice and user friendly pages.

SOUND COLLECTOR AUDIO REVIEW #2 magazine 2.95
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
Second issue of nice looking newsprint zine featuring thoughtful articles about records and artists that the reviewers actually WANT to write about and have something worthwhile to say. AQ-heartthrob Ian Christe writes about Necromandus, AQ-fave customers Bill Meyer and Jason Gross write about Kevin and Drumm and When, respectively. Au Pairs, The Faces, Wilco, Nikki Sudden, Rocket from the Crypt, Meredith monk, Koji Asano, DJ Shadow & Cut Chemist, Asmus Tietchens, that Mamma Mia! ABBA play that my mom's taking me to for my birthday (it's her third time), Jimmy Giuffre, and much more. Recommended.

SOUND COLLECTOR AUDIO REVIEW Issue #1 magazine 2.95
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
Laris Kreslin's nicely done Sound Collector magazine here releases a supplement, the Audio Review, which is sort of Village Voice-format on newsprint, and gorgeously designed by Stacey Wakefield. L-o-n-g reviews of records old and new, and for the most part they're pretty thoughtful pieces, the subjects including Thin Lizzy, Freestyle Fellowship, Vashti Bunyan, Peter Jefferies, Chessie, Charley Patton, Ryoji Ikeda, the Langley Schools Music Project, Mantronix, Pulp, Supersilent, and many more. The writers are a notable who's who of indie writing, with Jason Gross (Perfect Sound Forever), Joel Schalit (Punk Planet, Elders of Zion), Mike McGonigal (Chemical Imbalance, Yeti), etc.

album cover SOUND DIMENSION Mojo Rocksteady Beat (Soul Jazz) cd 21.00
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
A totally amazing collection of instrumental gems from Studio One's legendary in-house band. Best known for backing up the talented likes of Alton Ellis, The Heptones, Ken Boothe, Marcia Griffiths, Dennis Brown, and lots more, Sound Dimension are responsible for brewing up some of the most funky and warm sounding reggae tracks ever recorded, and in fact, so much of the music they created has been covered and duplicated by so many other artists that they almost sound like reggae standards now. What made Sound Dimension so irresistible was how they were actually fusing so many sounds in creating a new one. You can hear hints of big band, calypso, soul and funk all coming together to create a rocksteady sound that has withstood the test of time. As much as we loved the first collection of Sound Dimension tracks put out by Soul Jazz a couple years ago we are digging Mojo Rocksteady Beat even a little bit more!
While so many other in-house studio bands were of course technically amazing players they often lacked creativity and color, something Sound Dimension was totally oozing with. This is music pretty impossible not to fall in love with. So great!
MPEG Stream: "Rockfort Rock"
MPEG Stream: "Real Rock"
MPEG Stream: "Drum Song"

album cover SOUND DIMENSION Mojo Rocksteady Beat (Soul Jazz) 2lp 24.00
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
A totally amazing collection of instrumental gems from Studio One's legendary in-house band. Best known for backing up the talented likes of Alton Ellis, The Heptones, Ken Boothe, Marcia Griffiths, Dennis Brown, and lots more, Sound Dimension are responsible for brewing up some of the most funky and warm sounding reggae tracks ever recorded, and in fact, so much of the music they created has been covered and duplicated by so many other artists that they almost sound like reggae standards now. What made Sound Dimension so irresistible was how they were actually fusing so many sounds in creating a new one. You can hear hints of big band, calypso, soul and funk all coming together to create a rocksteady sound that has withstood the test of time. As much as we loved the first collection of Sound Dimension tracks put out by Soul Jazz a couple years ago we are digging Mojo Rocksteady Beat even a little bit more!
While so many other in-house studio bands were of course technically amazing players they often lacked creativity and color, something Sound Dimension was totally oozing with. This is music pretty impossible not to fall in love with. So great!
MPEG Stream: "Rockfort Rock"
MPEG Stream: "Real Rock"
MPEG Stream: "Drum Song"

album cover SOUND DIMENSION Soul Shake (Soul Jazz) cd 21.00
The legendary in-house-band of Studio One were responsible for laying down totally rich and funky tracks under vocalists like Horace Andy, Dennis Brown, Alton Ellis, The Heptones, etc. By merging elements of rock-steady, funk, roots, and jazz, they pretty much invented the foundation of the true reggae sound that would leave it's mark on the world for decades to come. Featuring a who's who of amazing musicians from the island, like Jackie Mittoo, Cedric Brooks, Leroy Sibbles, etc all under the legendary production of Clement "Sir Coxsone" Dodd. While their primary role was to be the house band at Studio One, they often would mess around in between sessions and work on instrumental tracks together. Jamaica Soul Shake collects those instrumentals, which showcase the essence of the raw and melodic birth of Reggae that they helped give life to. Every track on here hits the spot oh so nicely and once again reminds us of the magical warmth that was buzzing inside Studio One.
MPEG Stream: "Heavy Beat"
MPEG Stream: "Full Up"

album cover SOUND DIMENSION Soul Shake (Soul Jazz) 2lp 24.00
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
The legendary in-house-band of Studio One were responsible for laying down totally rich and funky tracks under vocalists like Horace Andy, Dennis Brown, Alton Ellis, The Heptones, etc. By merging elements of rock-steady, funk, roots, and jazz, they pretty much invented the foundation of the true reggae sound that would leave it's mark on the world for decades to come. Featuring a who's who of amazing musicians from the island, like Jackie Mittoo, Cedric Brooks, Leroy Sibbles, etc all under the legendary production of Clement "Sir Coxsone" Dodd. While their primary role was to be the house band at Studio One, they often would mess around in between sessions and work on instrumental tracks together. Jamaica Soul Shake collects those instrumentals, which showcase the essence of the raw and melodic birth of Reggae that they helped give life to. Every track on here hits the spot oh so nicely and once again reminds us of the magical warmth that was buzzing inside Studio One.
MPEG Stream: "Heavy Beat"
MPEG Stream: "Full Up"

album cover SOUND DIRECTIONS (YESTERDAY'S NEW QUINTET) The Funky Side Of Life (Stones Throw) cd 15.98
Madlib strikes again! This might be the best record to merge hip-hop production and aesthetics with funk and soul. Like the Yesterdays New Quintet records he has made with jazz lineups playing great instrumental versions of early Stevie Wonder songs. With this Sound Directions record Madlib has taken his love of obscure early 70's funk and soul to new heights. A production team which also includes Peanut Butter Wolf and instrumentation that includes kalimba, electric muffle, trumpet and a whole lot more. Interpretations of David Axelrod and Cliff Nobles and even more obscure '60s/'70s gems. A breezy undertone accents the entire record. The kind of record you want to play when you have some folks over for food drinks and a good time. Madlib's touch can be felt in the overall vibe of the recording. Smooth but not polished, a tad lo-fi but still infectious. True soul lives on.
MPEG Stream: "The Horse "
MPEG Stream: "The Funky Side Of Life"

album cover SOUND GUIDE TO THE TAILLESS AMPHIBIANS OF FRENCH GUIANA (CHRISTIAN MARTY / PHILIPPE GAUCHER) (CEBA/Centre Bioacoustique) cd 21.00
We're total suckers for frog records. And you all are too, judging from how many we sell. And why the hell shouldn't we be? Frogs are probably the greatest and most varied noisemakers in nature. In fact most of our favorite frog records, this one included, effortlessly surpass most of the thousands of meticulously crafted electronic records released every year. A gorgeous head spinning cacophony of squeals and shrieks and trills and hums and clicks and about a million other sounds that sound like they couldn't possibly be made by a tiny little frog. But here they are, in all their audial glory. A veritable symphony of strange sounds, separated by type of amphibian for your listening convenience. But these frogs aren't solo, they're nestled amidst a glorious world of crickets and wind and burbling brooks and various other insects and creatures. However, they are the featured performers on their tracks and you don't have to worry about not knowing which is the particular creature in question. Beautifully recorded, and meticulously documented, this is a treasure trove of amazing sounds, for the nature obsessed, the field recording connoisseur as well as lovers of strange sounds.
Hard to describe exactly what these beasts sound like, other than to say most of them don't sound like frogs. Some sound mechanical, some like other animals, there are frogs that sound like video games, like quacking duck, like Geiger counters, like the ping of undersea sonar, like woofing dogs, like ringing cellphones, like creaking bed springs, like someone rubbing on a washboard, like tiny little sirens, like a mewling baby, like an old fashioned alarm clock and yes, some of these frogs actually do sound like frogs...
So totally fascinating and amazing.
Comes with a huge booklet, with text both in English and French, about the recordings, each species of amphibian, and tons of gorgeous full color photos!!
MPEG Stream: "Allophryne Ruthveni"
MPEG Stream: "Dendrophryniscus Minutus"
MPEG Stream: "Bufo Guttatus"
MPEG Stream: "Bufo Margaritifer"
MPEG Stream: "Bufo Marinus"
MPEG Stream: "Colostethus Baeobatrachus"
MPEG Stream: "Dendrobates Ventrimaculatus"
MPEG Stream: "Hyla Boans"

album cover SOUND KILLERS Remix (self-released) 12" 8.98
Seems like hip-hop mixes had disappeared for a while there. All those sloppily pressed 7"s just dropped off the face of the earth. But we're fortunate to have locals still devoted to the art of fusing dancehall vocals to hip hop beats. What's refreshing about the four tracks on Sound Killers is that while most of the dancehall vocals are from fairly well known tracks, some of the hip hop rhythms are from older and otherwise less obvious tracks (ie: R.I.P. "One Minute Man" and Get Yr Freak On"). Included on this 12", two tracks to a side is Cutty Ranks "Limb By Limb" vs. Silas "The Jump Off", Capleton "Tour" vs. Baby "What Happened To That Boy", Supercat "Scalp Dem" vs. Eric B. & Rakim "Paid In Full", and Beenie Man "Girls Dem Sugar" vs. Erykah Badu w/Common "Love of My Life".

album cover SOUND OF FEELING Up Into Silence (Sunbeam) cd 16.98
Yes! The Sound of Feeling were a short lived but influential avant jazz-pop vocal group who recorded one full length album called Spleen in 1969 and a split LP with Oliver Nelson in 1968. Along with a handful of unreleased bonus tracks from the early seventies, Up into Silence collects their complete recordings. Comprised of pianist / arranger / singer Gary David, the counterpoint microtonal vocal talents of twin sisters Alice Rhae and Rhae Alice Andrece and rounded out musically with 2 bassists and a drummer, The Sound of Feeling updated the jazz-scat vocal style made popular by Lambert Hendricks and Ross and The Singers Unlimited by channeling John Coltrane and Thelonious Monk instead of Ella Fitzgerald or Louis Armstrong. But at times also referencing 16th-century madrigals, Bartok, the poetry of Paul Verlaine, as well as Simon and Garfunkel and Donovan amongst their many touchstones. Beginning with their take on Coltrane's version of "My Favorite Things", the first five tracks are from the split LP with Oliver Nelson. The four others are all originals including "Circe Revisited" which features the unusual instrumentation of Marxaphone, an autoharp type instrument with strings tuned to a microtonal scale. But it's their full length album, Spleen, where the group gets the most interesting. Opening with a bass and piano hook that has been sampled many times, the group's take on Donovan's "Hurdy-Gurdy Man" is one of the strangest and beautiful versions we've heard, taking the song through so many peaks and valleys (and even out on a few limbs) that never materialized in the original. With tracks like "Hex" and "Along Came Sam", it seems they left the jazz world altogether, and entered a lysergic avant chamber pop territory, with the basses, piano, vibes and drums alternating between killer breaks and restrained near-silent passages amongst the oddly tuned vocal acrobatics. The final 5 tracks were previously unreleased as the group were attempting to expand into hipper territories in the early seventies. The best of them, "Born Amongst The Eagles", continues with the amazing drum fills and some very strange vocal effects. Predicting the vocalese fusion style of Ursula Dudziak and Flora Purim, The Sound of Feeling were like a strange cocktail of Patty Water's Out vocals and the cool groove of Norwegian jazz singer Karin Krog. Their recognition is long overdue!
MPEG Stream: "Hurdy Gurdy Man"
MPEG Stream: "Hex"
MPEG Stream: "Born With The Eagles"

album cover SOUND PROJECTOR 18th Issue magazine 11.98
One of the first things we turn to in any music magazine is the reviews section. Yup, when we're not writing record reviews, we just love to read 'em. Go figure. So of course, that makes Ed Pinsent's Sound Projector one of our favorite mags around, seeing as how it mostly consists of reviews - well-written, expert ones, hundred and hundreds of them, covering all sorts of underground sounds we like, from field recordings to free improv to acoustic folk to electronic drone to black metal, and more!
With its trademark black/red/white cover color scheme intact, and expected massive bulk as well, the Sound Projector's 18th issue is here, straight from England, and we've really only just skimmed its 180 pages 'cause we're too busy right now with our own reviews (but we can't wait to dig into it this weekend!). The reviews are as usual grouped into several sections (International Surveys, Evil Noise and Rock, Art Music, Vinyl and Books, Melodic), those divided into even more precise (?) smaller groupings with designations like "Atoms Of Pure Noise", "Japan", "Touch Sevens", "The Droning Ones", "Stoner And Doom", "Tape Maschines Maken Klang"... Some labels get their own sections, some reviewers do too. There's an index in the back, in tiny tiny type, so you can find individual reviews alphabetically by artist if you like, but browsing through seems best.
Of course, more than a few of these records we've reviewed already (but it's nice to get a second opinion... and the SP crew don't always agree with what we said), and there's plenty more here we've been meaning to get to, or definitely will once we track 'em down on the basis of the Sound Projector's say. One thing we've always liked about the Sound Projector (and that we try to do too) is that they don't limit themselves to reviewing the -newest- of releases, so even if something's 2 or 3 or 5 years old, it might get written up here anyway, just 'cause someone's been listening to it and gotten enthused, regardless of when the record in question was released.
Like we said, it's mostly reviews (yay) but there IS some other content here too, including in-depth interviews with Industrial percussionist/composer Z'ev, English avant-folk guitarist C. Joynes, and '70 San Francisco synthpunks The Units!! Also, this issue comes with a download code for a free special Sound Projector mp3 compilation, English Wildlife, highlighting some unknown to us UK underground acts.
Basically, next to our own website, this is pretty much essential reading for all devoted AQ customer-types in our opinion!

album cover SOUND PROJECTOR PRESENTS VINYL VIANDS 2006 magazine 11.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
No, it's not quite time yet for the new issue (that'll be #15) of one of our favorite music 'zines, the UK's eclectic, enthusiastic, informative Sound Projector... not quite. To hold us over, though, the kindly Sound Projector staff have assembled this special "Vinyl Viands 2006" publication. As you may know, the majority of the pages of any issue of the Sound Projector are occupied by lengthy album reviews, covering all sorts of music, new and old, from disparate genres seemingly unified only by the fact that we here at AQ love 'em all too: drones, psych, folk, hip hop, metal, electronics, krautrock, noise, outsider stuff, and more... One regular feature of the SP is the Vinyl Viands section -- reviews of stuff the writers have picked up on LP, generally used. About as random as you can get, always full of interesting finds. Well apparently they've been maxing out their credit cards lately, disposing of their income in the best way possible, buying tons and tons of records, 'cause they wound up with enough "Vinyl Viands" reviews to fill a whole magazine. So they did. 78 big ol' pages packed with reviews of, as the cover states: "Jazz Vinyl! Old Vinyl! Rockin Vinyl! New Vinyl! Art Vinyl! Weird Vinyl! Coloured Vinyl!..." etc. Everything from Fred Frith to Hatebeak to Alice Cooper to Horace Silver!! T2, Annette Peacock, Ultravox, Sun City Girls, Pelican/Mono, Fanny, Fe-mail, Dennis Wilson, The Vitamin B-12... geeze if you're a record collector/music geek/AQ regular you're gonna LOVE reading all this. There's some special sections devoted to The New Blockaders and Poland's Obuh label, among other things. Enjoy.

album cover SOUND PROJECTOR, THE 14th Issue 2005-06 magazine 13.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
Thunk! Another issue of the UK's The Sound Projector just landed on my desk, obliterating any loose items and also obliterating my free time, as now all I want to do is read, read, read. Weighing in at 172 pages of musical criticism and appreciation, this handsome as usual new edition of one of our favorite "zines" is pretty much a must have for any dedicated AQ list reader! True, these aren't cheap (due to the exchange rate and the expense of shipping such a hefty tome) but it'll keep you busy for hours reading the gizillions of reviews of stuff new and old by The Sound Projector's capable and very opinionated crew of reviewers... and along with the reviews, there's in-depth interviews/features on Ashtray Navigations, Vibracathedral Orchestra, Jazzfinger, Harry Partch, The Shadow Ring, and more...
The Sound Projector has aways broken its reviews down into various taxonomic catagories, from drones to noise to ethnic music to field recordings to urban pop music, even. This issue's no exception, and in addition to such sections of AQ-approved-interest as "Music From Japan" and "Finnish Folk And Psych" we find editor Ed Pinsent's assessment of a variety of "Metal Men" (wherein he gives a plug to Aquarius, thanks Ed) like Converge, Boris, Burzum and SUNNO))), and also longtime SP contributor Jennifer Hor's "Pandaemonium!" chapter devoted to black metal: Xasthur, Striborg, Blut Aus Nord, Taake, Leviathan, Forest, Deathspell Omega, etc. Very cool. Where else are you going to find reviews of, say, Konono No.1, Velvet Cacoon, and Lula Cortes e Ze Ramalho all under the same covers? Well, besides our own website, of course. You can see why we like this. And the SP reviewers call 'em like they see 'em, beholden to no notions of common hipster consensus. They even criticize stuff we love. So it's refreshing to get their perpective (even if sometimes their tendency towards British smartarsedness runs away with them). Another chunk of this issue that we really enjoyed was Pinsent's evaluations of various random used records he picked up on a trip to the States and on eBay ("Vinyl Viands"). I'll have to email him with some suggestions for further Thin Lizzy purchases...

album cover SOUND PROJECTOR, THE 15th Issue magazine 13.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
You've been waiting, we've been waiting, here it is! The 15th handsomely red-black-and-white, thick-as-a-brick issue of one of the best magazines for weird music obsessives currently going, The Sound Projector out of the UK. As we always say, sort of an underground, 'zine-style counterpart to The Wire, but more diverse and genuinely enthused. And as always, this 148 page issue is made up mainly of record reviews (we know you love record reviews, you're reading our list after all!). Interesting stuff new and old sorted into a bewildering array of micro-genres and categories, from "Maladroit Rhythms Of Rock" to "The Crackling Ether" to "The Nordic Realms" to "The Droning Ones"... improv, folk, industrial, international, black metal, everything, There's hundreds of reviews here, with special attention this issue to "Noisy Rock, Evil Noise, and Black Noisy Music" alongside "marginal musics" of other sorts from around the world. On one page you'll be reading about Phill Niblock, on another Emit / Vrolok, on another Cellutron and the Invisible, on another Rehtaf Ruo, and on yet another Getatchew Mekurya...
And the SP's reviewers are perfectly willing to slag stuff they find lacking, no matter what the "received wisdom" about an artist is, and indeed, some of 'em we find a bit too harsh upon occasion. But that generally makes for good readin' and plenty of arguments. There's also a batch of interviews with music-makers on the fringes: Russ Waterhouse (The SB, Blues Control), Peter Strickland (Sonic Catering Band), Clay Ruby (Davenport Family), Mudboy, and UW Owl.
All in all, another essential slab of reading material for all dedicated AQ customer-types. We love it.

album cover SOUND PROJECTOR, THE 16th Issue magazine 14.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
Holy crap. This thing weighs a ton. 184 pages, a thicker even than usual A4 sized tome wrapped in their trademark red, black and white cover graphics. England's Sound Projector is back with its 16th issue, as always a must read for the sort of folks likely to be reading this review -- that is, if you're an avid AQ-list reader, you're gonna love Sound Projector, 'cause each enthused (yet sometimes scathingly critical) issue of this fanzine consists in large part of many, many music reviews, exploring the unusual, underground, avant-garde sonic territory that we at AQ love. And we usually learn a lot from each issue, from their obscure selections and thoughtful opinions. This time the 'zine is broken into five sections, starting with an international record review survey ranging the USA and UK to the "The Nordic Realms", where you'll find the "world music" likes of Getachew Mekurya and Raushan Orazbaeva right next to sundry "Free Folk" folks... Section two is also right up our alley, "Noisy Rock, Evil Noise, and Black Noisy Music", where you'll find reviews of the first three Earth albums (that's right, did we mention that the Sound Projector could care less about release dates, and just reviews whatever they want to from whenever it came out?) along with Darkspace, Forgotten Woods, Burning Star Core, and Darsombra among many more... Section three is all interviews rather than reviews (actually, there's reviews too), featuring talks with Japanese avant-guitarist Tetuzi Akiyama, UK experimentalist Philip Sanderson (of Storm Bugs and Snatch Tapes fame, among other things), German tape composer Frank Rothkamm, sound collagist Joe Frawley, and UK '80s "postpunk electronic ensemble" Cultural Amnesia. Then with Section four it's back to the reviews, of wide ranging "Art Music" from Annea Lockwood to Nurse With Wound... Finally there's section five, "Remainder", a miscellany of cassettes, drones, jazz, and much much more. Happily, page 184 of the magazine is an index, in very tiny type! Ackamoor, Idris right above Aethenor. Khlyst next to Kirchin, Basil. Softwar followed by Sombres Forets... nearly 400 reviews in all! A lot of things that we've listed too (now's your chance to get a second opinion) -and- lots of stuff we haven't even heard of at all! Recommended, even at the unavoidably steep import price (but it is the biggest Sound Projector yet).

album cover SOUND PROJECTOR, THE 17th Issue magazine 10.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
About every 7 and a half months or so, we get an email from Sound Projector publisher/editor Ed Pinsent over in England, informing us of the release of a new issue and politely inquiring as to whether we would like to perhaps order some copies. As if we would say no! Of course, his email elicits a "hell yeah!!" response from us, and some days or weeks later, depending on the vagaries of the international postal system, an exhausted mailman arrives bearing a heavy package stuffed with Sound Projectors, in this case, issue #17. And then we have hours of reading and mental note-taking ahead of us. Mental note-taking? That's 'cause aside from the odd interview or three (this issue: Sharon Kraus, Gen Ken Montgomery, Dead Letters Spell Out Dead Words) SP consists almost ENTIRELY of record reviews. And we LOVE record reviews. Sure, some are of things we already reviewed ourselves. But we find a lot of new (and old) stuff here, things we'd never heard of, or have in stock but hadn't yet gotten around to listing yet. So it's a great way to supplement your steady diet of Aquarius Records New Arrivals list reviews, that's for sure.
As per usual, this issue is broken into many "chapters" devoted to musics grouped either geographically ("The Nordic Realms") or by format ("Vinyl Viands 12-inch") or, mostly, by genre or should we say micro-genre ("Atoms Of Pure Noise", "The Droning Ones", "Utter Freakdom", "Shh - Quiet Music"). Literally hundreds and hundreds of albums discussed, in an opinionated and expert fashion. We definitely respect their reviewers, even if we don't always agree (though we often do, and in fact get name-checked in their thumbs up for the band Quest For Blood). And the wide range of music covered is right up our eclectic alley, from experimental field recordings to hippie folk to Norwegian black metal. We really can't imagine any regular AQ customer not wanting, nay, needing this magazine.
As big as ever (172 pages thick!), this issue is actually a bit less expensive than other recent Sound Projectors, as Ed found a cheaper (and faster, miracle of miracles) way to post 'em to us from across the pond. Yay!
Also, this comes with a special bonus, a free download of an album by Rhode Island synth-wizard Mudboy, exclusive to this issue of the Sound Projector.

SOUND PROJECTOR, THE Eighth Issue magazine 10.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
Yay! A new issue of this great magazine. What we said about the last issue still holds true: Magazine of the week, month, etc. Any new issue of Ed Pinsent's music 'zine The Sound Projector is a cause for joy. Anyone who buys and enjoys fellow UK music mag The Wire MUST pick this up, as it covers more-or-less the same range of musics (from electronics to avant-classical to dub to krautrock to drone to urban hip hop and more...) and does it in a much more genuine, fannish way. It's not a slick mag with lots of ads and pretentious music journalists writing with hip, trendy agendas, faults The Wire sometimes falls prey to--although it's big (154 pages, squarebound, 30 pages more than last ish!) and nice looking (with a instantly recognizable and pleasant black-white-and-red design aesthetic).
In this issue: the Rev. Dwight Frizzell, Peter Blegvad of Slapp Happy, the Argentinian concept band (and AQ-fave) Reynols (interview conducted by AQ's own Jim Haynes), Pita Rehberg of the Austrian label Mego, the very amusing (and perverse) Donald Miller of Borbetomagus, John Gill of Big Stick, and tons of reviews, from Eminem and Dead Prez to Loren Chasse, Pimmon, and the (now sadly out of print) Jazz Actuel box.

SOUND PROJECTOR, THE Eleventh Issue 2003 magazine 8.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
Another hefty 170 pages of music-obsessed text from Ed Pinsent and crew! Yay. We love this UK-based magazine, it's kinda like a hyper-enthused homebrewed 'zine version of The Wire, packed solidly with intelligent reviews reviews reviews of cool sounds both new and old, whatever sonic weirdness strikes their fancy from "throaty roarage" to "punk synth" to "maladroit rhythms of rock" (some of the review section titles here). This issue is a Seattle experimental music special, featuring interviews with Climax Golden Twins, Matt Shoemaker, Scott Colburn and others from that scene. In addition, there's talks with the likes of Francisco Lopez, Mnortham, William Basinski, and others as well. An awesome read, essentially essential to all AQ-list devotees!

SOUND PROJECTOR, THE Seventh Issue magazine 6.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
Magazine of the week, month, etc. Any new issue of Ed Pinsent's music 'zine The Sound Projector is a cause for joy. Anyone who buys and enjoys fellow UK music mag The Wire MUST pick this up, as it covers more-or-less the same range of musics (from electronics to avant-classical to dub to krautrock to drone to urban hip hop and more--avoiding metal tho, just like The Wire, that's both mags one main blindspot) and does it in a much more genuine, fannish way. It's not a slick mag with lots of ads and pretentious music journalists writing with hip, trendy agendas, faults The Wire sometimes falls prey to--although it's big (124 pages, squarebound) and nice looking (with a instantly recognizable and pleasant black-white-and-red design aesthetic). The magazine usually consists of mostly record reviews, and this issue is no exception, there's 163-or-so of 'em, in 22 eclectic, esoteric catagories: from Very Special Nothing Music (ultra-minimalism, reviews include Francisco Lopez and Bernard Gunter, of course) to Music From Japan (reviews of Tabata, Ground Zero, etc.) to Soundbombing (with reviews of the likes of Company Flow, Master P, Hot Boys, and an epitaph for Big Pun). And if you're reading our list, then you must like to read record reviews, eh? And one fo the nice things about the reviews is that they're not all of new stuff. The writers will go ahead and review something that they've been enjoying for a long time, or maybe recently discovered, even if it's a few years old, which is great 'cause that spotlights some otherwise forgotten gems. In addtion to the reviews, there's some indepth writing and interviews dealing with Van Dyke Parks, Otomo Yoshihide, People Like Us, Godspeed You Black Emperor, and more. Basically, a great magazine that more people (in the States) should find out about. Highly, highly recommended.

album cover SOUND PROJECTOR, THE Thirteenth Issue magazine 12.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
Yay! As aways, a happy day when another hefty issue of the UK's Sound Projector makes an appearance. 170 pages this time, resplendent in red-and-black-and-white as usual. We mentioned in another review recently how much we like *reading* record reviews (as, hopefully you do too). Well that's precisely why we dig The Sound Projector so much, it's almost nothin' but! Handily divided into various idiosyncratic "genre" catagories, this ish we get reviews of everything from "Atoms Of Pure Noise" (noise, such as Wolf Eyes and Space Machine) to "The Droning Ones" (drone music, examples being Birchville Cat Motel and Rosy Parlane) to "Music From Japan" (what it says: Ex-Girl, LSD-march, KK Null, etc.) to "Utter Freakdom" (the likes of Simon Wickham-Smith and Anla Courtis). And more: field recordings, electronics, quiet improv, psych reissues, underground folk, etc. And Merzbow gets his own section. Surprises this time around (there always are) include sections devoted to "Pain!" (black and other metals, with reviews of such artists as Meads Of Asphodel, Abruptum, Esoteric, and even Striborg, a Tasmanian black metal band we've been wanting to list for a long time but never can get enough of to do so), and also a section devoted to pop chart toppers past and present like Justin Timberlake, Madonna, Destiny's Child, Kylie Minogue, and others. Seriously. Yup, Destiny's Child in the same magazine with Coelacanth and Burzum. Hmm, sounds like our list, eh? But we've not heard of some of this stuff ourselves which makes it all the better a resource for us. And aside from the many many reviews of records new and old, you'll also find articles on the Monkees and Brian Wilson and interviews with My Cat Is An Alien, Rob Millis, Ronnie Sundin, and others. All in all, kinda like a fanzine version of The Wire but definitely weirder and more irreverent, eclectic and enthused. Recommended readin' for sure.

album cover SOUND PROJECTOR, THE Twelfth Issue magazine 12.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
Lengthy, opinionated, informative, well-written, expert reviews of the totally obscure music? No we're not talking about the list/website you're reading right now, we're talking about the fantastic British 'zine The Sound Projector. But we figure if you dig reading the AQ-list, especially the reviews of the more experimental, droney, weird, noisy, fucked-up stuff, you'll absolutely have to pick up The Sound Projector whenever it comes out. And so here's the new 2004 installment, featuring about 280 or so reviews (!!!), segregated into such catagories as "Field Recordings Plus", "Swedish Sound Art" and "Smashings, Slicings and Mad Inventors". Certain artists come in for in-depth examination: we get overviews of the recent output from Reynols, Keith Rowe, William Basinski, and Sparks among others. This time around the Sound Projector's reviewers seem to be concentrating on newer releases (past issues had a larger percentage of old faves getting written up) and there's plenty here that even we at AQ haven't heard/heard of yet. And, besides all the reviews, there's also interviews, with Peter Stampfel of the Holy Modal Rounders, Japanese noisician Guilty Connector, noisy Norwegian Lasse Marhaug, and AQ-fave turntable dronologist Philip Jeck (and others). In sum, quite recommended! It's true, the US dollar/British pound exchange rate is killing us here...but it IS 158 A4-sized pages. A hefty, handsome item indeed -- and it's a bigger/better read than most music 'zines.

album cover SOUND, THE From The Lions Mouth (1972) cd 14.98
The story goes that The Sound *should* have been huge - as big as any number of successful post-punk outfits like The Cure or The Fall or Echo & The Bunnymen - but for reasons seem to baffle most everybody, they didn't find that success. Frontman Adrian Borland cut his teeth in the 1976 punk frenzy in a project called the Outsiders; but grew dissatisfied with the amphetamine trad-rock that punk was becoming. The Sound formed around Borland's increasingly complicated songwriting, following a similar art-punk route that Howard DeVoto took after leaving The Buzzcocks to start the equally adventurous Magazine.
From The Lions Mouth was The Sound's second album, released originally in 1981; and it displays a big leap toward a more theatrical atmosphere and away from the jittery two-step punk-pop of their debut. By this record, frontman Adrian Borland developed a voice that falls somewhere between a couple of Ians - Ian McCulloch's Scott Walker croon in Echo & The Bunnymen and Ian Astbury's snakebit yelp then of Southern Death Cult. From The Lions Mouth also benefits from the lush, layered production of Hugh Jones. The Sound maps out much longer, tracks that soar, billow, and collapse with more aplomb than The Chameleons, Comsat Angels, or Cripsy Ambulance, exemplified by the album's final number "New Dark Age." It makes for an epic, sprawling album that does raise a lot of questions as to why The Sound didn't propel themselves onto MTV and beyond like so many of their contemporaries.
MPEG Stream: "Winning"
MPEG Stream: "Sense Of Purpose"
MPEG Stream: "Contact The Fact"

album cover SOUND, THE From The Lions Mouth (1972) lp 15.98
NOW ON VINYL!!
The story goes that The Sound *should* have been huge - as big as any number of successful post-punk outfits like The Cure or The Fall or Echo & The Bunnymen - but for reasons seem to baffle most everybody, they didn't find that success. Frontman Adrian Borland cut his teeth in the 1976 punk frenzy in a project called the Outsiders; but grew dissatisfied with the amphetamine trad-rock that punk was becoming. The Sound formed around Borland's increasingly complicated songwriting, following a similar art-punk route that Howard DeVoto took after leaving The Buzzcocks to start the equally adventurous Magazine.
From The Lions Mouth was The Sound's second album, released originally in 1981; and it displays a big leap toward a more theatrical atmosphere and away from the jittery two-step punk-pop of their debut. By this record, frontman Adrian Borland developed a voice that falls somewhere between a couple of Ians - Ian McCulloch's Scott Walker croon in Echo & The Bunnymen and Ian Astbury's snakebit yelp then of Southern Death Cult. From The Lions Mouth also benefits from the lush, layered production of Hugh Jones. The Sound maps out much longer, tracks that soar, billow, and collapse with more aplomb than The Chameleons, Comsat Angels, or Cripsy Ambulance, exemplified by the album's final number "New Dark Age." It makes for an epic, sprawling album that does raise a lot of questions as to why The Sound didn't propel themselves onto MTV and beyond like so many of their contemporaries.
MPEG Stream: "Winning"
MPEG Stream: "Sense Of Purpose"
MPEG Stream: "Contact The Fact"

album cover SOUND, THE Jeopardy (1972) cd 14.98
The story goes that The Sound *should* have been huge - as big as any number of successful post-punk outfits like The Cure or The Fall or Echo & The Bunnymen - but for reasons seem to baffle most everybody, they didn't find that success. Frontman Adrian Borland cut his teeth in the 1976 punk frenzy in a project called the Outsiders; but grew dissatisfied with the amphetamine trad-rock that punk was becoming. The Sound formed around Borland's increasingly complicated songwriting, following a similar art-punk route that Howard DeVoto took after leaving The Buzzcocks to start the equally adventurous Magazine. Jeopardy was the first album for The Sound, whose complex pop-punk was built around Borland's nervously chiming guitars and engaging hooks that paralleled those from The Cure's mod-pop debut Three Imaginary Boys, the theatrical bellowings of Juilan Cope's The Teardrop Explodes, and of course Magazine. This album was recorded roughly, supposedly for less than 800 British pounds; and the urgency (or panic) of getting everything to tape quickly works well with these songs. The Sound embellish a number of their new wave / punk tunes with glammy synthesizer melodies that harken back to Roxy Music and an occasional sax blurt for good measure; but it's Borland who passionately drives this band, one that should have been heard back then... and right now.
MPEG Stream: "I Can't Escape Myself"
MPEG Stream: "Heartland"
MPEG Stream: "Hour Of Need"

album cover SOUND, THE Jeopardy (1972) lp 15.98
NOW ON VINYL!!
The story goes that The Sound *should* have been huge - as big as any number of successful post-punk outfits like The Cure or The Fall or Echo & The Bunnymen - but for reasons seem to baffle most everybody, they didn't find that success. Frontman Adrian Borland cut his teeth in the 1976 punk frenzy in a project called the Outsiders; but grew dissatisfied with the amphetamine trad-rock that punk was becoming. The Sound formed around Borland's increasingly complicated songwriting, following a similar art-punk route that Howard DeVoto took after leaving The Buzzcocks to start the equally adventurous Magazine. Jeopardy was the first album for The Sound, whose complex pop-punk was built around Borland's nervously chiming guitars and engaging hooks that paralleled those from The Cure's mod-pop debut Three Imaginary Boys, the theatrical bellowings of Juilan Cope's The Teardrop Explodes, and of course Magazine. This album was recorded roughly, supposedly for less than 800 British pounds; and the urgency (or panic) of getting everything to tape quickly works well with these songs. The Sound embellish a number of their new wave / punk tunes with glammy synthesizer melodies that harken back to Roxy Music and an occasional sax blurt for good measure; but it's Borland who passionately drives this band, one that should have been heard back then... and right now.
MPEG Stream: "I Can't Escape Myself"
MPEG Stream: "Heartland"
MPEG Stream: "Hour Of Need"

album cover SOUNDCARRIERS, THE Celeste (Melodic) cd 16.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
Not sure how this great UK band has manages to remain so far under the radar here in the States, as they create such bright and fully realized pop songs played with major chops and such immaculately crafted precision. They explore similar sonic landscape as folks like Stereolab, in the way they tap into the best of light psych-pop from years past while creating songs that have such a driving force and are filled with swirling melodies and kaleidoscope vision. Every element in their sound is so top notch. From the perfect soft and dreamy vocal delivery, to versatile instrumentation that is beholden to the best kind of sugary pop as it is to the power of krautrock like repetition and gliding psych excursions. Sounds sort of Saint Etienne and Broadcast coming together to make songs in the spirit of some awesome combination of the most catchy and poppy side of Can along with the carefree groovy '60s pastoral pop of The Free Design!!
MPEG Stream: "Last Broadcast"
MPEG Stream: "Morning Haze"
MPEG Stream: "Rolling On"

album cover SOUNDCARRIERS, THE Harmonium (Melodic) cd 16.98
We're always up for really well executed and super engaging psych-pop. The UK's Soundcarriers are hitting the spot so perfectly this summer, updating '60s psych-pop (a la Stereolab) and creating new sounds with a totally timeless feel. Everything about this album is so flawlessly executed. Recorded with such deep flowing warmth we wouldn't be surprised if these songs were all captured to analog tape, as each instrument sounds so rich and full. Armed with a strong pop sensibility, the Soundcarriers remind us of a bit more muscular Belle & Sebastian, with nice doses of pastoral psychedelic undertones that bring to mind a more pop minded version of Dungen. They also know how to tap into a slight groove with just the right touches of breezy effervescence and have us hearing hints of a wide range of folks like Sergio Mendes, Alceu Valenca, Galaxie 500, American Analog Set, The Free Design, and The Elephant's Memory who some of you might remember from their role as the stand-in-band for the Velvet Underground in Midnight Cowboy. There is a fluidity to these songs and a flow to this album that proves that The Soundcarriers have found a way to bring strong influences of the past to create something modern, yet timeless, of their own. So nice!
MPEG Stream: "Time Will Come"
MPEG Stream: "On That Line"
MPEG Stream: "Harmonium"

album cover SOUNDCARRIERS, THE Harmonium (Melodic) lp 22.00
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
Now available on vinyl!
We're always up for really well executed and super engaging psych-pop. The UK's Soundcarriers are hitting the spot so perfectly this summer, updating '60s psych-pop (a la Stereolab) and creating new sounds with a totally timeless feel. Everything about this album is so flawlessly executed. Recorded with such deep flowing warmth we wouldn't be surprised if these songs were all captured to analog tape, as each instrument sounds so rich and full. Armed with a strong pop sensibility, the Soundcarriers remind us of a bit more muscular Belle & Sebastian, with nice doses of pastoral psychedelic undertones that bring to mind a more pop minded version of Dungen. They also know how to tap into a slight groove with just the right touches of breezy effervescence and have us hearing hints of a wide range of folks like Sergio Mendes, Alceu Valenca, Galaxie 500, American Analog Set, The Free Design, and The Elephant's Memory who some of you might remember from their role as the stand-in-band for the Velvet Underground in Midnight Cowboy. There is a fluidity to these songs and a flow to this album that proves that The Soundcarriers have found a way to bring strong influences of the past to create something modern, yet timeless, of their own. So nice!
MPEG Stream: "Time Will Come"
MPEG Stream: "On That Line"
MPEG Stream: "Harmonium"

SOUNDGARDEN Hunted Down (Sub Pop) 7" 5.50
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.

album cover SOUNDGARDEN King Animal (Universal Republic) cd 15.98

album cover SOUNDING THE DEEP Glacier (Sonic Meditations) cassette 5.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
This one should be a no brainer. Any one into space rock krautdrone a la Expo 70, might as well just stop reading and grab this right now.
Recorded by Expo 70's Justin Wright, and released on his Sonic Meditations label, Sounding The Deep definitely sounds like it could have been Wright under a different name, the same sort of brooding psychedelic drift, the same blissed out ambience, the same minimal blurred dronescapes, the same occasional forays into something slightly heavier and Sunn-ier, but it's actually the work of a fellow named David Williams. And don't assume that Sounding The Deep are a rip off of Expo 70, they just happen to tread the same sonic territory. Imagine the furthest reaches of space, Wright's Expo 70 is drifting aimlessly through the stars, coordinates set for the heart of some distant sun, when who should drift into view, Sounding The Deep, their trajectory an entirely different far off sun, a wholly different destination, but with a shared journey.
Sounding The Deep to our ears sounds a bit more droney, and abstract, not as heavy or space-y, instead, more contemplative, minimal and abstract, tendrils of guitar melody drift in a haze of deep low end tones, occasionally thickening into something a bit more dense and blackened, but retaining a proper amount of bliss and shimmer, the resulting overall sound is more like slowcore or shoegaze, but slowed waaaaaaaaay down, to a crawl, what once might have been a dirge, is transformed into something much more ephemeral and ethereal, chords and melodies are spread out over minutes rather than seconds, tones are allowed to ring out, and dissipate, chords sprawl spaceward, almost disappearing completely before the next one is sent in its wake. Hushed, minimal, dark and lovely, definitely essential listening for folks into the dreamier side of spacedrone, could be your new favorite late night chill out drift off soundtrack... it's fast becoming ours!
MPEG Stream: "Cosmic Shore"
MPEG Stream: "Glacier"

album cover SOUNDING THE DEEP Glacier (Sonic Meditations) cd-r 5.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
This one should be a no brainer. Any one into space rock krautdrone a la Expo 70, might as well just stop reading and grab this right now.
Recorded by Expo 70's Justin Wright, and released on his Sonic Meditations label, Sounding The Deep definitely sounds like it could have been Wright under a different name, the same sort of brooding psychedelic drift, the same blissed out ambience, the same minimal blurred dronescapes, the same occasional forays into something slightly heavier and Sunn-ier, but it's actually the work of a fellow named David Williams. And don't assume that Sounding The Deep are a rip off of Expo 70, they just happen to tread the same sonic territory. Imagine the furthest reaches of space, Wright's Expo 70 is drifting aimlessly through the stars, coordinates set for the heart of some distant sun, when who should drift into view, Sounding The Deep, their trajectory an entirely different far off sun, a wholly different destination, but with a shared journey.
Sounding The Deep to our ears sounds a bit more droney, and abstract, not as heavy or space-y, instead, more contemplative, minimal and abstract, tendrils of guitar melody drift in a haze of deep low end tones, occasionally thickening into something a bit more dense and blackened, but retaining a proper amount of bliss and shimmer, the resulting overall sound is more like slowcore or shoegaze, but slowed waaaaaaaaay down, to a crawl, what once might have been a dirge, is transformed into something much more ephemeral and ethereal, chords and melodies are spread out over minutes rather than seconds, tones are allowed to ring out, and dissipate, chords sprawl spaceward, almost disappearing completely before the next one is sent in its wake. Hushed, minimal, dark and lovely, definitely essential listening for folks into the dreamier side of spacedrone, could be your new favorite late night chill out drift off soundtrack... it's fast becoming ours!
MPEG Stream: "Cosmic Shore"
MPEG Stream: "Glacier"

album cover SOUNDMURDERER Wired For Sound (Violent Turd) cd 10.98
Man, have I been waiting for something like this for years. A massive mega mix of classic drum and bass / jungle / dancehall. Takes me back quite a few years when jungle was brand new (to us at least). When finding jungle 12"s was a challenge and even finding clubs that played jungle was practically impossible. A bunch of us (often with AQ pal Lesser in tow) would go to local bars and just sit in the corner, luxuriating in the stuttery staccato beats, waiting for the bass to drop and huge swells of thunderous sub-bass synths to wash over us. And for me, even though jungle is supposedly 'played out', it remains as fierce and heavy and raw as it ever was. This mega mix has all the great 12"s from the early days of jungle, tracks by Cobra, Remarc, Cutty Ranks, Krome & Time, Shy FX, Tek 9, DJ Hype, Barrington Levy, Squarepusher, Ninjaman, Decoder, Plug and tons more!. No diva vocals, no syrupy melodic dance crap, just monstrous Amen breaks (the drum loop du jour of jungle) everywhere, skittery and frenetic, pitched up and down and all around, stuttering and hiccupping and pounding, with throbbing basslines and rib cage rattling synth stabs. And as a bonus for all of you dancehall heads, there's plenty of toasting and junglized reggae tunes. I remember most of my friends at the time, ESPECIALLY my drummer friends, being totally skeptical and dismissive, saying stuff like "It's just a drum machine" and "the beats are so repetitive". But that's the point. The rhythms -are- repetitive, I mean, they were made to dance to right? But they are SO complex, inhumanly so, and the buzz and stutter of beats swirling wildly from speaker to speaker makes the repetitive nature of the music all the more hypnotic and trance-y. And how could anyone obsessed with rhythm, especially drummers, not be totally mesmerised by these hyperspeed/convoluted beats? I've found myself driving around in my housemate's truck (which has a booming system) just blasting this comp, trying to replicate the feeling of the big bass bins pounding me into the corner of that dingy club years ago, and at the same time, have lulled myself to sleep with this comp buzzing and skittering in my ears. Even if you were on the scene and have a lot of these 12"s, there may be a bunch you don't have, and it's nice to have all this stuff on one convenient disc, although the tracks are split into three 20+ minute megamixes which makes finding particular songs a bit of a chore. But odds are, you'll just listen to this whole thing over and over and over. Folks who picked up the Bug cd from the last list should really check this out as should anyone into crazy fucked up elctronica/dancehall/digital hardcore. Fucking great!
MPEG Stream: "Track 01"
MPEG Stream: "Track 03"

album cover SOUNDMURDERER & SK-1 Toronto V.I.P. (Planet Mu) 12" 8.98
We've long been complaining about the dearth of "grime" in the States, so we were psyched to discover that the folks at Planet Mu decided to do something about it. They've been re-issuing UK grime releases for the states, but this latest batch of 12"s offers up some grime / jungle hybrids as well as their own twisted take on dubstep and grime. And it kills!
We absolutely loved the Soundmurderer comp from a ways back, a killer mix of classic drum and bass and ragga jungle, that sound we can never get enough of, so it's kind of cool to hear these guys take on some of this new fangled dubstep business sort of blending it into their already killer techstep sound. Super fucked up and weirdly funky, jump up jungle (with a hint of grime) a bit of toasting over the top, and then halfway through the A-side, the jungle drops and completely destroys. The B-side is super repetitive with ultra distorted bass and blown out synth melodies.

SOUNDMURDERER & SK-1 Whowasseekwar (Shockout / Tigerbeat 6) 12" 7.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.

SOUNDS FOR LITTLE ONES s/t (Dish Records) cd 12.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.

album cover SOUNDS OF AMERICAN DOOMSDAY CULTS The Church Universal and Triumphant Inc. feat. Elizabeth Clare Prophet (Faithways International) cd 17.98
Here's some of what what we wrote about this gem way back when it first came out as a vinyl release:
It's hard to believe this is real. In fact, it took a lot to convince Andee, who was sure this was some sort of elaborate prank. But it's one of those things that just makes you proud / embarrassed to be an American. Elizabeth Clare Prophet purchased 24,000 acres in Paradise Valley, Montana and started The Church Universal and Triumphant, a creepy new age doomsday cult in which Prophet channeled spirits such as Jesus, Buddha, K-17, Morya, Quan Yin, Afra, Hercules, Mighty Victory, Astrea, Shiva, Pope John XXIII, and more. (Sort of like J.Z. Knight of Yelm, Washington and her channelling of "Ramtha" except even more scary.) Prophet and her husband stockpiled arms, built giant bomb shelters, and coerced their devotees to purchase their own survival equipment at exorbitant prices. Throughout its existence various members of CUT were indicted for kidnapping, lost custody of the children who belonged to the church and were investigated for tax exempt status and firearms violations. In 1995 former member Joseph Pietrangelo Jr wrote a book condemning CUT entitled "Lambs to Slaughter: My Fourteen Years with Elizabeth Clare Prophet and Church Universal Triumphant".
But the thing that really puts CUT on the map for us is their way of conducting their religious services. The tapes of these services have been floating around for years already. Those of you familiar with Negativland's 1989 album "Escape From Noise" will already be familiar with an excerpt of one of the tracks on this album, as they used it for the track "Michael Jackson", and Steve Fisk has been using these tapes for years as well. This record features live recordings of Clare Prophet 'speaking' out against the evils of rock music. She sounds perfectly normal as she introduces her 'psalms' or 'songs' or 'speeches' or whatever they are. But when she gets going, it's amazing. And so goddamn insane sounding. Her rapid fire high pitched testifying sounds a bit like an impossible mix of an auctioneer, a yodeller, the guy who sings the directions at a square dance, Neil Hamburger huffing helium and variations of baseball's 'hey batter batter' chant only faster. It's like that sound you make when you sort of hum/breathe out and move your finger up and down between your lips making a sort of 'bebubebubebubebubebubebubebubebu' sound. It's one of the most amazing things we've ever heard! Cup's group I Am Spoonbender even performed a cover version of it live in concert a few years ago! A must for all cult fanatics, new age withdrawal victims, seekers of the truly strange, and fans of extended, trancelike vocal techniques. Ever so highly recommended! We'd almost have made this cd edition our Record of the Week if we weren't certain that it would probably bug the heck out of more people than (like us) would love it!!
MPEG Stream: "Dedication To The Of The Beast And The Dragon - The Momentum Of Rock 'N' Roll"
MPEG Stream: "Call For Protection"

album cover SOUNDS OF AMERICAN DOOMSDAY CULTS VOL. 14 The Church Universal and Triumphant Inc. feat. Elizabeth Clare Prophet (Faithways International) lp 17.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
It's hard to believe this is real. In fact, it took a lot to convince Andee, who was sure this was some sort of elaborate prank. But it's one of those things that just makes you proud / embarassed to be an American. Elizabeth Clare Prophet purchased 24,000 acres in Paradise Valley, Montana and started The Church Universal and Triumphant, a creepy new age doomsday cult in which Prophet channeled spirits such as Jesus, Buddha, K-17, Morya, Quan Yin, Afra, Hercules, Mighty Victory, Astrea, Shiva, Pope John XXIII, and more. (Sort of like J.Z. Knight of Yelm, Washington and her channelling of "Ramtha" except even more scary.) Prophet and her husband stockpiled arms, built giant bomb shelters, and coerced their devotees to purchase their own survival equipment at exorbitant prices. Throughout its existence various members of CUT were indicted for kidnapping, lost custody of the children who belonged to the church and were investigated for tax exempt status and firearms violations. In 1995 former member Joeseph Pietrangelo Jr wrote a book condemning CUT entitled "Lambs to Slaughter: My Fourteen Years with Elizabeth Clare Prophet and Church Universal Triumphant".
But the thing that really puts CUT on the map for us is their way of conducting their religious services. The tapes of these services have been floating around for years already. Those of you familiar with Negativland's 1989 album "Escape From Noise" will already be familiar with an excerpt of one of the tracks on this album, as they used it for the track "Michael Jackson", and Steve Fisk has been using these tapes for years as well. This record features live recordings of Clare Prophet 'speaking' out against the evils of rock music. She sounds perfectly normal as she introduces her 'psalms' or 'songs' or 'speeches' or whatever they are. But when she gets going, it's amazing. And so goddamn insane sounding. Her rapid fire high pitched testifying sounds a bit like an impossible mix of an auctioneer, a yodeller, the guy who sings the directions at a square dance, Neil Hamburger huffing helium and variations of baseball's 'hey batter batter' chant only faster. It's like that sound you make when you sort of hum/breathe out and move your finger up and down between your lips making a sort of 'bebubebubebubebubebubebubebubebu' sound. It's one of the most amazing things we've ever heard! Cup's group I Am Spoonbender even performed a cover version of it live in concert a few years ago! A must for all cult fanatics, new age withdrawal victims, seekers of the truly strange, and fans of extended, trancelike vocal techniques. Ever so highly recommended! We'd almost have made this cd edition our Record of the Week if we weren't certain that it would probably bug the heck out of more people than (like us) would love it!!
RealAudio clip: "Invocation For Judgement Against And Destruction of Rock Music"
RealAudio clip: "Decree"
RealAudio clip: "Dedication To The Tackling Of The Beast And The Dragon-The Momentum Of Rock And Roll"

album cover SOUNDS OF FROGS AND TOADS OF BOLIVIA (R. MARQUEZ, I. DE LA RIVA, J. BOSCH & E. MATHEU) Sounds Of Frogs And Toads Of Bolivia (Guia Sonora De Las Ranas Y Sapos De Bolivia) (Alosa / Fonoteca Zoologica) 2cd 37.00
We love frogs!!! Although the AQ website only offers two records of frogs (not counting the awesome and problematic musical group the Frogs), both HIGHLY RECOMMENDED, our personal collections seem to be bursting at the seams with field recordings of frogs. Never has there been a creature capable of producing so many impossibly unanimal like sounds. This gorgeously packaged and super deluxe collection comes from the wonderful Sittelle (it's not on their label, but they do distribute it) who in the past have brought us the sounds of rutting red deer, hillsides of pastoral cowbells and recordings of bats! So we knew this was going to be good. We were just a little unprepared for how good! It comes in a massive oversized jewel case with a 50 page booklet with extremely extensive liner notes, both in English and in Spanish, the amazing thing is there are almost 200 tracks, each one a different frog, and each track has specific liner notes as well as a full color photo of the frog! WOW!
But it's the sounds that have us all smitten with the world of frogs, and they don't get much more wild and weird and incrdibly varied than this collection right here.
There are of course a few of instantly recognizable 'croaking frogs', sort of nature tape style, but the majority here are completely bizarre and otherworldly (but without being aggravating). The frog calls typically sound nothing like frogs, here's a random sampling of what some of these frog call sound like to us: metal ping pong balls clinking together, a rapid fire mechanical woodblock like on one of those crazy pizza joint one man band player piano thingies, high pitched metallic scrapes and squeals, clinks and clanks like a broken music box, a barking seal, chirping birds, the sound of a stick hitting a tin can, a rusted hinge, a creaking door, a quacking duck, a strange looped industrial rhythm, a crying child, a bicycle horn orchestra, Tuvan throat singing, shortwave interference and it just goes on and on. It's almost like listening to some avant music concrete sound artist. But just to prove this is indeed the sound of nature, you also get the surrounding ambient sounds, rushing water, children playing, wind blowing, birds chirping, crickets, rustling leaves, it's quite a gorgeous and perplexing musical journey through nature. And quite possibly our favorite frog record yet!!!!
MPEG Stream: "Bufo Castaneoticus"
MPEG Stream: "Bufo Granulosus Major"
MPEG Stream: "Bufo Paracnemis"
MPEG Stream: "Melanophryniscus Rubiventris"
MPEG Stream: "Hyla Andina"
MPEG Stream: "Hyla Boans"
MPEG Stream: "Hyla Lanciformis"
MPEG Stream: "Hyla Leali"
MPEG Stream: "Osteocephalus Sp."

album cover SOUNDS OF JAPANESE DOOMSDAY CULTS Music By Aum Shinri Kyo Leader Shoko Asahara (Faithways International) 7" 6.50
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
This all time favorite, a primo slab of WTF weirdness, available again, and a bit cheaper too, but who knows for how long...
From Faithways, the label what brought us that extreme example of American religious fuckery The Church Universal And Triumphant, comes two songs from the leader of the Japanese Cult Aum Shinri Kyo. The cult made history in 1995 when they set off sarin nerve-gas in a crowded Tokyo subway, killing 11 people and injuring 5000 (they were later charged for the murder of another 14 people -- some quite gruesomely, as described within the accompanying booklet.) The nearly blind leader Shoko Asahara fancied himself a bit of a singer / songwriter, much like fellow cult leaders Charles Manson, David Koresh (whose rock band is featured on the label's first release) and even the lovable Anton LaVey. Musically, Shoko's songs most resemble the latter cultist's works, but with an even greater whimsy that he could be jokingly referred to as Casiotone For The Pathologically Deranged. Better yet, take Nagisa Ni Te, drop the vocals a couple octaves, change the instrumental accompaniment to casio keyboards, throw in melodic hints to "It's A Small World After All" and you can almost hear the weird world of Shoko Asahara.
Comes with a 6 page booklet detailing the cult's history.
RealAudio clip: "Sonshi's March"
RealAudio clip: "Lord Death's Counting Song"

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