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IMPORTANT (Please read to avoid confusion):
Some items below may be tagged with a bold, red, all-caps "out of print/unavailable" notice. This does NOT mean that all other items not so tagged are, in fact, in stock -- or for that matter, in print and available, though there's a good chance they are. Some folks get confused on this point, and we can see why, so please read this for further clarification and other important before-you-order information. Unlike some mailorder websites, we don't have an electronic inventory system linked to our site, so you can't be sure of what we actually have or don't have in stock at any given moment without asking us -- please email our mailorder department for availability status -- or better yet, just go ahead and place your order using our shopping cart function and we'll get back to you with the status of each item. If you have general non-mailorder questions, email the store.


1990 I GUERRIERI DEL BRONX AKA 1990 THE BRONX WARRIORS (WALTER RIZZATI) OST (Death Waltz) lp 29.00
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.

album cover 24 HOUR PARTY PEOPLE (SOUNDTRACK) (London) cd 26.00
This is the companion disc to the film "24 Hour Party People" which is a narrative telling of the Factory Records saga and the Manchester sound, and which premiered at Cannes. Most of you are probably already familiar with the signature sound of the era (and if you aren't then this is a nice sampler to jumpstart with), so we'll skip the basics to ask the questions we're all thinking: "Who the heck is going to play Ian Curtis? Is there going to be a Mark E. Smith impersonator?"
With 17 classic tracks from Happy Mondays, Joy Division, New Order, 808 State, Durutti Column, Buzzcocks, and more. Besides the tried and true (which have all been released before, but still sound amazing!), there's also one new song by New Order (it's the first soundclip below) and a ill-advised Moby mix of a live version of Joy Division's "New Dawn Fades" played by New Order, the Chili Peppers' John Frusciante and Smashing Munchkins' Billy Corgan. Pages and pages of liner notes written by Factory co-founder / Hacienda club co-owner Tony Wilson himself.
The website for the film is pretty interesting, lots of interviews and articles exclusive to the site: http://217.204.45.80/main.php.
RealAudio clip: NEW ORDER "Here To Stay"
RealAudio clip: JOY DIVISION "Love Will Tear Us Apart Again"
RealAudio clip: DURUTTI COLUMN "Otis"

album cover 5,000 FINGERS OF DR. T, THE (MUSIC BY FREDERICK HOLLANDER) OST (Film Score Monthly) 3cd 32.00
We've never been much for musicals. Sure Jesus Christ Superstar had its moments. So did Godspell. And Hair. Hell, some of us even saw Annie and Evita when we were kids. But musicals definitely just seem to rub us the wrong way. Overly dramatic and hammy, the songs cloying and annoyingly earwormy. But then there's this. A live action motion picture musical, conceived of, and written by, none other than Dr. Seuss! A twisted Technicolor fantasy, the story of a young boy who hated practicing the piano, and the evil piano teacher who kidnaps him, and 499 other children, to play his insidious tune on a custom built 5000 key piano, and who also kidnaps and brainwashes the boy's mother, only to be rescued (spoiler alert) by a friendly sympathetic plumber! The movie was a only a middling success when it was first released in 1953, as it turned out to be a bit too scary for children (it's practically psychedelic as well), and thus ended up a cult classic, with viewings playing out like Rocky Horror screenings, the crowd singing along and reciting the dialogue along with the characters. The interesting thing is, that much of the music composed for the film was cut from the final edit, and when we originally carried the single disc version of this soundtrack way back when, it was woefully incomplete. But this right here is as about as complete as it gets, delivering not only the soundtrack as it's heard in the film, but also alternate versions, composer sketches, preproduction material, instrumental orchestral tracks, and most excitingly of all, the soundtrack as it was originally conceived and composed, with all the original cues, songs, ballets, and more. It's fantastical and over the top: sumptuous '50s orchestral arrangements meet soaring swoonsome strings meet marching band numbers and of course there are the various numbers sung in loopy Dr. Seussian rhymes, it's pretty far out, a twisted Seussian musical, that even removed from the incredible visuals, still sounds so fantastic.
Originally, the movie was planned to be a vehicle for Danny Kaye and Bing Crosby (as the evil Dr. T and the plumber, respectively... how crazy would that have been?!), but they ended up casting relative unknowns, and the story itself was both an anti-Hitler allegory and an all encompassing anti authoritarian manifesto (focused specifically on the looming threat of the atomic bomb), but all of that stuff was very subtle, hidden underneath clever wordplay, a fantastical plot, and incredible costumes and sets. If you haven't seen it, you should, it's fun and funny and freaky, often compared to The Wizard Of Oz too, for its whole "It was all just a dream... Or was it???" premise, but all told, it's definitely the music that seals the deal, composed by Frederick Hollander, it's creative and inventive and playful and occasionally over the top, occasionally sweeping and dramatic, but always totally mesmerizing and catchy, whether goofy and fun and frolicky, or ominous and sinister.
First check out "Ten Happy Fingers", that's the song Dr. T plans on having his kidnapped children play on the giant piano, it's super catchy, and that melody resurfaces throughout, but quickly, the soundtrack shifts, and the orchestra begins to weave gorgeous soundscapes of shimmery strings, and moaning horns, classic soundtrack stuff for sure, epic and majestic and darkly moody, sweeping and soaring, lovely and dreamy and mysterious, there are ballads, "Many Questions" is all torch songy, "Hypnotic Chant" sounds like a classic movie musical duet, but just a little bit twisted, it is the part where Dr. T is hypnotizing the mother after all! Then there's Dr. T's "Do Re Mi" where he sings about his favorite note, which is of course ME. Probably the most famous song is "Dungeon Shlim Shlam" also known as "The Dungeon Ballet", which is one of the best parts of the movie, where all the NON piano players are sent to a dungeon to play, well "What other instruments are there??", so they end up playing all sorts of fantastical made up instruments. "The Dressing Song" is one of the wackier tracks, and the one with the most obviously Seussian lyrics, "Get Together Weather" is another track with Seuss heavy wordplay, and so it goes.
We could go track by track by track, but it's all just so good. Old timey for sure, but a lot of this stuff definitely sounds timeless. And the extras, WOW. The alternate versions are definitely worthwhile, and the liner notes go into extraordinary detail about just how they differ, and why there are multiple versions. And then there are the orchestral tracks, which are gorgeous, so lush and lovely and beautifully orchestrated, but it's the composer sketches and pre production material that we find ourselves listening to more than we expected, low fidelity recordings, very scratchy, but so lovely, just solo piano versions of the various tracks, which speaks to their timelessness, even sans orchestra and vocalists, these songs are incredible, and those skeletal versions definitely offer a unique glimpse into the process. And then of course, for folks who just want to listen to the songs EXACTLY the way they are in the movie, there is a soundtrack cut, with all the extras and cut songs and alternate versions removed, so it plays just like the film.
So incredible, and incredibly curated. A true labor of love. The liner notes are extensive and super interesting, the story of the composer, of the film, and most impressively, track by track notes about each song's placement, and inspiration, and what scene it accompanies in the film. Tons of photos and anecdotes and pretty much anything and everything you could ever want to know about what is quite possibly one of the most enchantingly dreamy AND disturbingly nightmarish kids' films ever. And most definitely one of our all time faves!
MPEG Stream: "Main Title (Original)"
MPEG Stream: "Dungeon Shlim Shlam"
MPEG Stream: "Cut to T./Dressing Song"
MPEG Stream: "Enter Dr. T / Hypnotic Chant"
MPEG Stream: "Ten Happy Fingers"
MPEG Stream: "New Lead-In to Get Together Weather/Get Together Weather"
MPEG Stream: "Freckle On A Pygmy"

album cover 5000 FINGERS OF DR. T, THE OST (El / Cherry Red) cd 15.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
There's been a spurt of awesome old film soundtracks for awesome old films coming through our door in the last while -- Daisies, Valerie And Her Week Of Wonders, Blood On Satan's Claw, Bedazzled, The Hindenberg, and now this one! The 5000 Fingers Of Dr. T! Not MR. T, mind you, as one customer thought! Hahaha, that would be a whole 'nother bizarre thing, wouldn't it? Nope, this is a children's movie musical from 1953, but it's one of the most enchantingest dream AND disturbingest nightmare kids' films ever. Makes total sense when you discover that the man behind it was noneother than Theodor Geisel (aka Dr. Seuss!!!).
Quite prim and tame by today's standards, but there's still some stretches that are downright disturbing and bizarre. For those unfamiliar with it, long story short, the tale centers around a young boy learning to play piano. As one might expect, the soundtrack is quite heavy on the tickling of ivories, but you'll also be swept up in sumptuous '50s orchestral and marching band numbers as well as parts of the storyline sung in loopy Dr. Seussian rhymes. Don't miss the "Elevator Song" and "Dressing Song Do-Me-Do Duds" (you might recall The Simpsons' Mr. Burns doing a rendition of that one!). A deliriously twee delight that's not just for kids.
MPEG Stream: "Ten Happy Fingers"
MPEG Stream: "We Are Victorious"

album cover 8 MILE (OST) (Interscope) cd 19.98
Here's the soundtrack to 8 mile, Em's new hit, semiautobiographical movie. I have yet to see it, but even our pickiest friends liked it and it made something crazy like 54 million the first weekend at the boxoffice. Eminem donated three new songs to this soundtrack, Lose Yourself is the first on the disc and is already all over the radio, a totally great song. He also produced much of the album, which includes Gang Starr, Jay-Z, Rakim, Nas, Xzibit, D12 and Macy Gray. Em's Shady Records signees 50 Cent and Obie Trice are featured throughout. Obie was on Eminem's song "Drips," from The Eminem Show album. 50 cent is a New York artist who Dr. Dre and Eminem co signed to their labels. He's been self promoting with mix tapes, and apparently has cred in NY. Eminem says he wrote these three songs through his character "Rabbit's" voice. Comes with Shady / Aftermath artist sampler.
RealAudio clip: EMINEM "Lose Yourself"
RealAudio clip: EMINEM/OBIE TRICE/ 50 CENT "Love Me"

album cover A MIGHTY WIND: THE ALBUM (OST) (Sony) cd 17.98
Throughout their beloved mockumentary movies Spinal Tap, Waiting For Guffman, Best In Show and now A Mighty Wind, Christopher Guest, Michael McKean and co. have done a smashing job faithfully replicating musical styles right down to the most miniscule detail. You might even say that quite often it puts the 'real' thing to shame. Pssst... if you've yet to see AMW which focuses on three very different fictitious embodiments of folk music - the squaresville upstart New Main Street Singers, veteran trio The Folksmen and beloved duo Mitch & Mickey - what the heck are you waiting for?! Perhaps one of their most astute skills is in knowing when to apply humor (either subtle or over-the-top) and when to play things totally straight. They locate just the right moment to give your funny bone a wallop or tug gently at your heartstrings. The latter is so fully realized in Mitch & Mickey's bittersweet duet "A Kiss At The End Of The Rainbow". Eugene Levy and Catherine O'Hara's voices ring so clear and true as the former sweethearts. Sigh! It makes our ol' softie Ms Cup get all misty eyed. Of course, this is a must-have for those of you who've seen (and re-seen) the movie and/or the fabulous live production that came to the Warfield recently. Recommended!!!
MPEG Stream: "A Kiss At The End Of The Rainbow"
MPEG Stream: "Never Did No Wanderin'"

A TOWN CALLED HELL OST (Singular Soundtrack) 2cd 11.98

ABRIL & MARCELLO GIOMBINI, ANTON GARCIA ...4..3..2..1...MORTE (GDM) cd 16.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
The soundtrack to this 'lost classic' soft core space movie is separated into 2 different movements, sort of. The tracks entitled 'Seli' of which there are 5, are cheesy and hippy shimmery vocal workouts ala many sixties/seventies low budget fantasy films. But the tracks entitled '4.3.2.1...Morte! (seq 1-10)" of which there are 10 (obviously) are the reasons to pick this up. Haunting (but still hippy) and chilling and spooky and goofy sounds of love and space and terror and romance and space again. Weird. Definitely not essential, but if you like this sort of thing, it's definitely a keeper.
RealAudio clip: "Seli (Main Title)"
RealAudio clip: "4.3.2.1...MORTE! (Seq.3)"

ABRIL & MARCELLO GIOMBINI, ANTON GARCIA ...4..3..2..1...MORTE (GDM) lp 14.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
The soundtrack to this 'lost classic' soft core space movie is separated into 2 different movements, sort of. The tracks entitled 'Seli' of which there are 5, are cheesy and hippy shimmery vocal workouts ala many sixties/seventies low budget fantasy films. But the tracks entitled '4.3.2.1...Morte! (seq 1-10)" of which there are 10 (obviously) are the reasons to pick this up. Haunting (but still hippy) and chilling and spooky and goofy sounds of love and space and terror and romance and space again. Weird. Definitely not essential, but if you like this sort of thing, it's definitely a keeper.

ADAMSON, BARRY As Above So Below (Mute) cd 15.98
Adamson's previous records have intentionally been film scores for films that never existed, blueprints for him to explore the issues in his life, not the least of which is his biracial ethnicity. In his fifth solo album, the former bassist for the Bad Seeds and Magazine unveils his most song-oriented album. The trademark apocalyptic noir swing and murky production are present but with a sinister application of Leonard Cohen-style vocals. There's a point in the middle of the album (Here I Stand) where all of the ghosts and demons are scared up to intense peaks of aural chaos... and it sounds so good!

ADAMSON, BARRY Moss Side Story (Mute) cd 15.98
Mute U.K. has finally seen fit to reissue this: hallelujah! This is his first soundtrack (of 4, 3 of which are for films that don't exist). Brilliant album from one of my favorite musicians in the whole world. The cd version adds 3 songs unavailable elsewhere, including the truly essential theme from the Sinatra-as-junkie film The Man With The Golden Arm. "In a black & white world, murder adds a touch of colour." Get this album first!

ADAMSON, BARRY Moss Side Story (Mute) lp 15.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
Mute U.K. Has finally seen fit to reissue this: hallelujah! This is his first soundtrack (of 4, 3 of which are for films that don't exist). Brilliant album from one of my favorite musicians in the whole world. The cd version adds 3 songs unavailable elsewhere, including the truly essential theme from the Sinatra-as-junkie film The Man With The Golden Arm. "In a black & white world, murder adds a touch of colour." Get this album first!

ADAMSON, BARRY The Murky World of... (Mute) cd 15.98
A "best of" collection from Barry Adamson's five solo albums outside of his work from the Bad Seeds and Magazine... filmic scores of very dark and moody jazz, rumble-ass basslines, brassy outbursts, and post-punk pop.

album cover ALESSANDRONI, ALESSANDRO I Cantori Moderni Di Alessandroni (Penny / Flipper Music) lp + cd 27.00
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
Another amazing Italian Library missive from the same folks who brought us the Daniela Casa we reviewed a while back. Alessandroni, most famously known for being the whistler for Ennio Morricone's Spaghetti Western soundtracks, was a fantastic composer in his own right as we heard previously on Prisma Sonoro, a haunting library score reissued on the Australian Roundtable label last year. On this 1970 release he created the vocal group, I Cantori Moderni Di Alessandroni, an eight to sixteen person choir, who have lent their talents to many soundtracks by Morricone, Piero Umiliani, and many other Italian composers of the 60's and 70's (and were also featured recently on Quentin Tarantino's Django Unchained soundtrack). This was the only full length the choir recorded. Through 12 original compositions by Alessandroni, the choir evoke a lilting cinematic pop sound of Italian Bossa vibes and moody themes, augmented by harpsichord, flutes and twangy guitars. The choir not only featured Alessandroni's first wife, Giulia De Mutiis, but also the incomparable Edda Dell'Orso whose wordless vocals epitomize many of Morricone's Italian western and horror scores. Fantastic and Limited!!
MPEG Stream: "Una Storia"
MPEG Stream: "Verso l'infinito"
MPEG Stream: "Insieme A Te"

ALESSANDRONI, ALESSANDRO Inchiesta (Sonor Music Editions) lp 26.00

album cover ALGUERO, AUGUSTO Todas Sus Grabaciones En Polydor 1968-1971 (Rama Lama Music) 2cd 25.00
A vibrant mix of early Serge Gainsbourg, Burt Bacharach, Ennio Morricone and Carl Stalling, Augusto Alguero was a Spanish composer for film and televison and this two disc survey is an incredible journey of his best output from 1968-1971. From space age bachelor pad music to ye ye pop with big lush orchestrations and swinging tunes. GROOOOOVY, baby!

album cover ALLAN, DAVIE & THE ARROWS Devil's Rumble: Anthology '64-'68 (Sundazed) 2cd 28.00
Awesome! You can always count on Sundazed to do retrospective compilations right! Here's a super comprehensive collection of Davie Allan's music. You might already be unknowingly familiar with him 'cuz he did countless songs for numerous '60s biker b-movie soundtracks. Some of them even treat you to a rumbling motorcycle intro. His fantastic guitar sound comes tearing outta your speakers with a fierce energy. Who can resist "Blue's Theme"? You can almost smell the gas fumes and feel the bad guys closin' in behind ya. Most of the tracks are pretty straightforward surf garage instrumentals, but there are a few that are more abstract and trippy (such as the piano-laced "The Ghost Story" that brings the first disc to a close) as well as one with vocals too (the woozy "Glory Stompers" on the second disc). Forty badass tracks in all! Killer!
MPEG Stream: "Blue's Theme"
MPEG Stream: "The Ghost Story"

album cover AMERICAN SPLENDOR (OST) (New Line Records) cd 16.98
Soundtrack to this great film about Harvey Pekar. Only two of the tracks here are what would be considered the "original score", composed by Mark Suozzo, the rest are the -- mostly -- jazz cuts featured throughout the film (undoubtedly some of Pekar's faves). Along with a couple tracks by close friend and collaborator Robert Crumb (with his Cheap Suit Serenaders) there are some rare and not-so-rare tracks by John Coltrane, Joe Maneri, Lester Young & Oscar Peterson, Dizzy Gillespie, Marvin Gaye and more. The collection is annotated with liner notes by Harvey himself -- how could it be otherwise, right? Also included on the disc, for those of you with computers (and I know one or two of you out there have one), is a collection of comic book covers, screen savers, instant messenger icons, desktop wallpaper, and an exclusive comic you can print out. Cool.
MPEG Stream: JOE MANERI "Paniots Nine"
MPEG Stream: MARK SUOZZO "Time Passes Strangely"

album cover AMORES PERROS (SOUNDTRACK) (Universal) 2cd 23.00
I was waiting to review this soundtrack until I had seen the movie, which finally happened last week, and all I have to say is MAN IS THAT FILM AWESOME OR WHAT. I'm not going to review the movie here or give too much away, but suffice to say that in the same way that the movie mixed up three quite different stories into one seamless whole, the soundtrack has been brilliantly compiled and tracked in such a way that many different kinds of music work so well together. There's Cypress-Hill-style hip hop (very sassy and hard hitting), traditional Latin stuff (Celia Cruz), super earnest man-with-acoustic-guitar songs, The Hollies (? but it works), weirdo electronic alt-rock, some contributions from the popular rock group Cafe Tacuba, and the whole thing is held together with interspersed soundscapey incidental interludes courtesy Gustavo Santaolalla. Very, very well done... and there's two whole discs! Well worth your money.
RealAudio clip: GUSTAVO SANTAOLALLA "Tema Amoera Perros"
RealAudio clip: CONTROL MACHETE "Si Senor"
RealAudio clip: LOS DEL GARROTE "La Cumbia del Garrote"
RealAudio clip: CONTROL MACHETE "de Perros Amores"
RealAudio clip: CAFE TACUBA "Avientame"

ANAND, VIJAYA Dance Raja Dance (Luaka Bop) cd 16.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
Stellar compilation of South Indian film music. A great, complex hybrid of western pop and Asian classical & pop. A barrage of genres meet in beautiful and confounding ways. Sweet, perfect voices singing love songs -- translations provided. This is an absolutely essential, ALL TIME FAVORITE here at Aquarius.

album cover AND GOD CREATED WOMAN (OST) OST (Cherry Red) cd 17.98
Bridget Bardot featured soundtrack!

album cover ANDREWS, MICHAEL Donnie Darko OST (Death Waltz ) lp 33.00
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
From the same label that just reissued John Carpenter's Escape From New York soundtrack, comes this deluxe, 140 gram vinyl version of Michael Andrews' score for the 2001 film Donnie Darko, which finds the score remastered, and re-packaged with original artwork by Tom French, along with an A2 sized poster, also with French's artwork. Here's a slightly altered/updated version of our review of cd version, when we first listed it way back in 2002:
Easily one of, if not THE, best movies of 2001. Dark and beautiful and sad and haunting and creepy as fuck. A gorgeously surreal, sort-of-horror film, sort-of-coming-of-age-film, with tender awkward teen romance, family tragedy, alienated youth, and with some time travel and a giant demon-faced bunny thrown in for good measure. So delicate and tender, but genuinely frightening at the same time. And much of the mood is owed to the amazing score. A dark mix of rumbling drones and melancholy piano, wispy minor key song fragments, atonal musique concrete, and a totally soul stirring, heartbreaking, and eerie version of Tears For Fears' eighties classic "Mad World" (you know the one: "...the dreams in which I'm dying are the best I ever had..."). Much of the soundtrack proper (separate from the score) is made up of songs by Tears For Fears, Joy Division and Echo And The Bunnymen, Duran Duran and others, but the score itself is something much darker, and is the perfect balance to those eighties pop tunes, and the reworked "Mad World" is sort of the perfect mix of the two. Also includes an alternate mix of "Mad World" with skittery lo-fi drum machine that actually works pretty well, giving it a sort of Portishead vibe. Like the movie, WAY recommended.
The lp version includes liner notes by director Richard Kelly and artist Tom French.
RealAudio clip: "Mad World "
RealAudio clip: "Gretchen Ross"
RealAudio clip: "Ensurance Trap"
RealAudio clip: "The Artifact and Living"

album cover ANDREWS, MICHAEL Me And You And Everyone We Know - Original Film Score (Everloving) cd 14.98
You loved the movie in the theater, now you can love the soundtrack in your car, living room or anywhere! Yup, here's the soundtrack to Miranda July's acclaimed film Me And You And Everyone We Know featuring a score composed by Michael Andrews (who also scored Donnie Darko and Freaks And Geeks!). Even without visual accompaniment it's a dreamily contemplative listen. Perfect if you're seeking something that will evoke a sense of calm in your surroundings. A spoken word piece by Ms July opens the proceedings, but from that point on it's primarily an instrumental work. Warm, smooth tones from a full spectrum of instruments drift, waft and float languidly for a spell, then dissipate. It's not until the sixth track that a human voice resurfaces. The mellow Cody Chesnutt sung "5 On A Joyride" could easily be mistaken for one of Money Mark's sensitive guy pop songs. After that, the soundtrack maintains the soothing pace with additional occasional verbal and non-verbal vocal interludes ("Peter And Sylvie" is particularly lovely!). Rounding off the album's sixteen tracks are a couple by Spiritualized (their very Jesus And Mary Chain-esque "Any Way That You Want Me") and Virginia Astley.
Psst, if you need more of Andrews' music, we've also just received his new solo album cd/book set Hand On String!
MPEG Stream: ANDREWS, MICHAEL "Peter And Sylvie"
MPEG Stream: CHESNUTT, CODY "5 On A Joyride"

album cover ANGELS FROM HELL (OST) (Reel Time) cd 17.98

album cover ANIMA MORTE Face The Sea Of Darkness (Dead Beat Media) cd 12.98
We're always talking about how much we love '70s Italian horror soundtrack prog maestros Goblin. If you share our passion, then we've got a(nother) band for you!
Not too long ago, we highlighted a cd-r by an artist called Umberto, who did a highly synth based, DIY take on the Goblin / giallo soundtrack sound. Everyone dug that one so much, we figured we'd also better list this, something else we just discovered, a band from England called Anima Morte who are obviously in love with Goblin too. Like Umberto, this is laced with plenty of buzzing, sinister synth. But unlike Umberto, Anima Morte are an "actual" band, a four-piece, and as such has a bit more of a proggy, rock sound, with guitars that are almost metal in parts. It's almost entirely all instrumental, with (synthesized?) vocal choirs wordlessly haunting the proceedings now and then. There's calm, delicate moments, with placid piano melodies and electronic drone, and other parts that are a lot more frantic, driven by busy bass and mathy yet grooving drums, getting almost into Magmoid, "Zeuhl" territory. Fans of the likes of Guapo, Zombi, and especially Crime In Choir - as well as Goblin - should be interested!
Now, anyone familiar with the sort of soundtrack music that this is inspired should know that there's often a grandiose & romantic, perhaps slightly cheesy element to it that's also part of the charm, and Anima Morte don't shy away from incorporating that aspect of their influences too. After all, Goblin wasn't really "scary" music all the time, or at least they demonstrated that '70s discofunk can be as suspenseful as more obvious atmospheres of gloom! But in any case, Anima Morte are more creepy than kitschy, though of course the two can go together.
While Anima Morte might not be making the most original music on this week's list, it's very enjoyable, if you're into the same spooky stuff they revere. It's done with plenty of verve and sincerity all right, and boy does it sound like the real deal, some lost soundtrack to a '70s Argento or Fulci flick.
MPEG Stream: "A Decay Of Mind And Flesh"
MPEG Stream: "He Who Dwells In Darkness"
MPEG Stream: "Devoid Of Soul"

album cover ANWORTH KIRK s/t (Pre-Cert Home Entertainment) lp 19.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
Demdike Stare fans listen up! There's a new dark mysterious stranger in town by the name of Anworth Kirk, and for fans of Demdike Stare's haunted dub sound paintings or that Broadcast and The Focus Group record we keep raving about, or any of the vintage horror soundtracks from Trunk Records, you will surely want to give this a listen. No, Anworth Kirk is not really a person, or a band, as far as we can tell, but it's the first release on the new archival imprint Pre-Cert Home Entertainment that will be devoted to releasing a series of limited vinyl missives of contemporary musical and non-musical strangeness. Most definitely associated with DJ Andy Votel and the B-Music crew as well as Demdike Stare themselves (in fact, we're pretty sure Anworth Kirk IS Andy Votel and Sean Canty of Demdike, who run the Pre-Cert label), the music presented here is a mind-bending collage of haunting creaking loops, far away noises of babies crying and dogs barking, slow motion creeping synths, library music, and eldritch incantations culled from dusty corners of British horror. So haunting and beautiful! Limited to 500 copies, it is basically already out of print, so grab one of the few we have while you can!

album cover AQUARIUS BUTTONS 2 x 1" buttons 1.00
Hey, we just got another batch of AQ buttons made up...
Spread the word! Show the world your true aQ colors! COOL COOL COOL aQ buttons, now in 6 different vibrant color combinations. 5 new color combos (blue on pink, red on dark grey, dark blue on blue, orange on black, and yellowish green on dark green) and a popular one we had previously (brown on yellow).
TWO FOR $1!!! Colors are random, but buy enough and you'll be guaranteed to get 'em all! And of course all feature our spiffy James Gang style logo!! So stylish!

album cover ARTEMIEV, EDUARD Solaris (Superior Viaduct) lp 23.00
We are so excited to see this incredible score to one of our all time favorite films finally issued on vinyl. Long unavailable in any format, the electronic scores that Eduard Artemiev created for Russian director Andrei Tarkovsky's fantastic and meditative seventies sci-fi films Solaris, Mirror and Stalker are some of the most incredibly moving and brooding soundtracks we have ever heard. So much so, that the movies would not have had such a deep emotional impact without them. This original 1972 Solaris score (not to be confused with the later eighties re-recording, also being reissued on another label) in particular is eerily contemplative, full of chilling electro-acoustic drones, romantic Bach organ fugues and dreamily ponderous passages wrought with field recordings, gongs, and ghostly choruses, that are both beautiful and terrifying in equal measure.
Solaris can be seen as the Eastern European counterpart to Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey, as both films are meditative existential ruminations on the metaphysical schism that divides human and alien understanding. Based on Stanislaw Lem's 1961 novel, the film centers on a space psychologist Kris Kelvin who is sent to investigate the mysteriously stalled progress of a space expedition sent from Earth to study the strange planet Solaris. When he arrives, he finds the three person crew oddly isolated from each other and the station in disarray. The mystery deepens when he awakens the following morning and sees his late wife (who killed herself years ago) asleep beside him. It seems that the planet Solaris is actually a sentient life-form that is using the passengers' past memories as a means of communicating with them. However, not understanding what consequences may come about when confronted with uncanny manifestations of painful memories from the past, the planet's attempt at making contact with the expedition causes the crew to become emotionally dysfunctional and self-destructive. In Tarkovsky's multi-layered narrative, no amount of space travel can separate us far enough from the past that continually haunts us.
In 17 movements, Artemiev's score is centered on Bach's "Choral Prelude for Organ in F Minor" as a recurring theme. The mix of classical and electro-acoustic music underlies the visual set design of the space station which also features oddly enough, reproductions of Old Master paintings, in particular the 16th century series "The Months" by Pieter Bruegel The Elder. The confluence of past and future motifs in the film as well as the score is startling effective allowing for an uneasy ruminative moodiness on the nature of time. The frigid electronic passages give voice to an oceanic planetary presence that is absolutely awe-inspiring beset in harrowing timbres that calm and intensify in subtle slow-moving waves. Only Tarkovsky can make windy wild meadows, foggy woods and tumultuous oceans feel so unfamiliar and freakishly alien. The second side opens up to more dreamier and stranger sonic passages, including a theme based on Kelvin's dead wife Hari that is beautifully haunting with a short choir interlude. From there, that leads into a snippet of Russian folk-song, and field recordings of birds, dogs, voices and gongs, with eventually both the Bach organ pieces and the cavernous electronics intermixing more and more intensely together with epic results.
Comes beautifully packaged with 3 variant covers featuring different film stills (sorry, we can't guarantee which one you will get!), and a full color booket of static shots from the film. Another win for the increasingly amazing Superior Viaduct label. Essential!
MPEG Stream: "Movement 3"
MPEG Stream: "Movement 9"
MPEG Stream: "Movement 16"

album cover ARTEMIEV, EDUARD Solaris (Music From The Motion Picture) (Mirumir) lp 36.00
We were admittedly confused by the simultaneous releases of Russian composer Eduard Artemiev's scores for Andrey Tarkovsky's iconic film Solaris on both the Miurimir and Superior Viaduct labels (not to mention Invada's upcoming lp release of Cliff Martinez's score for the Soderbergh remake). We made the Superior Viaduct reissue Record of The Week a few weeks ago, and that record was from the original score, recorded in 1973. We understood the Russian label Muirimir's reissues (which also include a separate Stalker/Mirror soundtrack release also reviewed here), to be Artemiev's late eighties re-recordings of the original scores. Artemiev wanted to have his soundtrack music available and the original tapes were supposedly lost, so he re-recorded the scores using modern equipment, as the original synths used for the film scores were no longer available. We usually tend to frown on such re-workings, as often the new recordings pale in comparison to the original, but in this case, particularly with the Solaris score, these are tracks that have never before been released on vinyl and they sound amazing. While there is some crossover between the Muirimir and Superior Viaduct releases, the Muirimir focuses mainly on music in the original Solaris film that was not included on the Superior Viaduct release. These tracks have a much more pulsating sci-fi quality to them that differs from the alien concrete droniness of the original score, and paints a more complete picture of the film than just the Superior Viaduct release alone.
Music from Tarkovsky's later films, Stalker and Mirror also get a conjoined release with re-recorded tracks from each film filling up an lp side. The Stalker score might just be our favorite of Artemiev's recordings. A mix of epic alien ambiance and pastoral psych melodies of flutes, and guitars. It evokes a more intense version of Popol Vuh's iconic scores for Werner Herzog. A perfect accompaniment to Tarkovsy's existential and brutalist spiritual journey that seemingly borrows from The Wizard of Oz's dual worlds of black and white and color, but suggests a more creepy pre-Chernobyl vision of a toxic colorized environment. The two long tracks that cover the music from Mirror, (a film we can't even begin to explain, you must see it for yourself) are collages of themes that mix nostalgic classical melodies with intense squalls of industrial ambient noise. The sound ebbing and flowing in dreamy, hazy patches like beautiful yet painful memories. Both scores come highly recommended!

album cover ARTEMIEV, EDUARD Stalker / Mirror (Mirumir) lp 36.00
We were admittedly confused by the simultaneous releases of Russian composer Eduard Artemiev's scores for Andrey Tarkovsky's iconic film Solaris on both the Miurimir and Superior Viaduct labels (not to mention Invada's upcoming lp release of Cliff Martinez's score for the Soderbergh remake). We made the Superior Viaduct reissue Record of The Week a few weeks ago, and that record was from the original score, recorded in 1973. We understood the Russian label Muirimir's reissues (which also include a separate Stalker/Mirror soundtrack release also reviewed here), to be Artemiev's late eighties re-recordings of the original scores. Artemiev wanted to have his soundtrack music available and the original tapes were supposedly lost, so he re-recorded the scores using modern equipment, as the original synths used for the film scores were no longer available. We usually tend to frown on such re-workings, as often the new recordings pale in comparison to the original, but in this case, particularly with the Solaris score, these are tracks that have never before been released on vinyl and they sound amazing. While there is some crossover between the Muirimir and Superior Viaduct releases, the Muirimir focuses mainly on music in the original Solaris film that was not included on the Superior Viaduct release. These tracks have a much more pulsating sci-fi quality to them that differs from the alien concrete droniness of the original score, and paints a more complete picture of the film than just the Superior Viaduct release alone.
Music from Tarkovsky's later films, Stalker and Mirror also get a conjoined release with re-recorded tracks from each film filling up an lp side. The Stalker score might just be our favorite of Artemiev's recordings. A mix of epic alien ambiance and pastoral psych melodies of flutes, and guitars. It evokes a more intense version of Popol Vuh's iconic scores for Werner Herzog. A perfect accompaniment to Tarkovsy's existential and brutalist spiritual journey that seemingly borrows from The Wizard of Oz's dual worlds of black and white and color, but suggests a more creepy pre-Chernobyl vision of a toxic colorized environment. The two long tracks that cover the music from Mirror, (a film we can't even begin to explain, you must see it for yourself) are collages of themes that mix nostalgic classical melodies with intense squalls of industrial ambient noise. The sound ebbing and flowing in dreamy, hazy patches like beautiful yet painful memories. Both scores come highly recommended!

album cover ARTEMIEV, EDUARD The Mirror / Stalker (Superior Viaduct) lp 23.00
Finally, the original scores of Andrei Tarkovsky's films Mirror and Stalker get a proper reissue. We previously listed the eighties re-recordings of this soundtrack music on Mirumir a while back, but this Superior Viaduct reissue is, dare we say it, far superior, filling out the Mirror score with some of the nostalgic Russian folk music and classical elements that the other reissue lacked.
The Stalker score, short as it is, might just be our favorite of Artemiev's recordings. A mix of epic alien ambiance and pastoral psych melodies of flutes, and guitars in metallic acidic washes. It evokes a more intense version of Popol Vuh's iconic scores for Werner Herzog. A perfect accompaniment to Tarkovsky's existential and brutalist spiritual journey that seemingly borrows from The Wizard of Oz's dual worlds of black and white and color, but suggests a more creepy pre-Chernobyl vision of the transformative magic of a toxically-charged colorized environment. Mirror on the other hand is an uncompromising headlong dive into a darkly magical past of longing, regret and the unreconcilable effects of memory. The music, brooding and intense, full of liturgical ambiance and an unsettling sense of nostalgia, punctuated by old world folk tropes and romantically distant classical fugues weighs heavy. Both scores, as well as the films they accompany are beautifully powerful and deep, and come highly recommended!
MPEG Stream: "Stalker (excerpt)"
MPEG Stream: "Mirror (excerpt)"

ARTEMIEV, EDWARD Solaris, The Mirror, Stalker (Electroshock) cd 18.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
Russian electronic music composer Edward Artemiev is certainly best known for his film soundtrack work, especially his scores for famed director Andrei Tarkovskiy's weird and beautiful, avant-garde sci-fi films like Stalker and Solaris from the 1970s. Artemiev's synth music & orchestrations are appropriately moody, ranging from blissful and serene to the quite eerie and ominous... Previously his soundtracks were available as very expensive Japanese imports (now super hard to find, if not entirely out of print), so we were happy to be able to finally track down and stock this Russian disc compiling music from three of Artemiev/Tarkovskiy's most sought-after scores. Four tracks from Stalker, seven from Solaris (including a Bach piece arranged by Artemiev), and one from Mirror. Plus, the composer's grandiose 1989 "Dedication to Andrei Tarkovskiy" is the final, nine-minute track on this disc. Late news: Byram is convinced that these are re-recordings of the original film scores done by Artemiev in the late '80s, not the original (presumably lost) tapes. Still, quite nice.
RealAudio clip: "Stalker - Theme"
RealAudio clip: "Stalker - Train"
RealAudio clip: "Solaris - Station"

album cover BADLY DRAWN BOY About A Boy (Original Soundtrack) (XL Recordings) cd 16.98
Once Byram brought it to our attention that Mr. Damon Gough sounds remarkably like a rather chipper Elliott Smith, we couldn't hear these songs as being sung by anyone but! Check out the songs "Something To Talk About" or "River Sea Ocean" if you wanna hear for yourself what we're talking about. So if you've been craving something new from either of these gifted songcraftsmen, this soundtrack might be calling your name. It's all here! Rollicking do-do-dododo's, sweeping string and horn swirliness, sweetly strolling acoustic guitar melodies, lush female backing vocals... oh yes, and of course, his scruffy, knit-capped, sensitive guy voice. He *is* a lot more happy then Elliot Smith, though, and the music sounds that way too. Oh and one more lil' observation, the second track sort of swerves in and out of Sanford and Son tv show theme song-ness. Strange, but aside from that oddness, this impressive soundtrack will certainly not disappoint Mr. Gough's many admirers, will certainly win him a batch of new ones, and will tide everyone over until the next BDB album proper.
RealAudio clip: "Something To Talk About"
RealAudio clip: "River Sea Ocean"
RealAudio clip: "Walking Out Of Stride"

album cover BANGS Call And Response (Kill Rock Stars) cd 11.98
Ahhh. The Bangs are back with this cd ep of high energy, guitar riffin, punk rockin', high pitched yipping, sweet and sweaty Sleater Kinney-ish RAWK! The Bangs definitely sound like Olympia girl rock, big time. And Sleater Kinney comparisons are unavoidable; they also remind us of the Go-Go's but with a '70s rock edge. Cool stuff.
RealAudio clip: "Call And Response"
RealAudio clip: "Kinda Good"

album cover BARDOT, BRIGITTE Love Is My Profession (El Records) cd 16.98
Not actually a Brigitte Bardot record...it's just music from films she was in...kind of so-so.

BARGELD, BLIXA Recycled (Rough Trade) cd 16.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
I'd really like the press kit to say "Blixa Bargeld, the frontman and singer of Einsturzende Neubauten, is well acquainted with the music of film and theater, having seen numerous films himself." But it doesn't.

BARIGOZZI GROUP Optical Sound (Easy Tempo) cd 16.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
Smooth jazzy guitar, horn and keyboard melodies float over a sexy, Italian Charlie's Angels soundtrack.

BARRY, JOHN The EMI Years Volume One: 1957-1960 (Scamp) cd 14.98
John Barry's pioneering rock'n'roll and instrumental music recorded prior to his James Bond film scores. The Wire says: "John Barry is the toast of the Easy Listening revival...[His music] has inspired a generation of musicians, from Portishead to John Zorn...In-your-face electric guitar, surging big band swing and cool minor key 'anxiety' harmonies." 37 tracks, over 75 minutes of music, illustrated booklet.

album cover BARRY, JOHN The Lion In Winter OST (Columbia/Legacy) cd 8.98
To be honest, we never paid this classic 1968 film that much attention because we always thought it was some treacley long-winded historical romance, but boy we're we wrong. It's actually more like a fucked-up dysfunctional family drama disguised in medieval garb, and it even takes place at Christmas! Plus the soundtrack is fantastic.
Starring Peter O'Toole and Katherine Hepburn with young Anthony Hopkins and Timothy Dalton in their first screen appearances, this is the story of King Henry II (O'Toole) having to deal with his indecisiveness of whom amongst his three unworthy sons shall inherit the throne. Complicating his decision is his imprisoned Queen, Eleanor of Aquitaine (Hepburn), who once a year is released from her tower prison to celebrate Christmas with the family. She has her own ideas of which son should inherit the kingdom, and bitter rivalries, intrigue and underhanded political maneuvering ensue. The chemistry between O'Toole and Hepburn is as sharp and acidic as Liz and Dick In Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf, making their flirtatious hatred towards one another so engaging to watch. Originally a play, the movie is fleshed out cinematically with an atmospheric quality of pastoral England, and enhancing the vibe is this beautiful soundtrack by John Barry, mixing classic sixties film orchestration with ethereal psychfolk-tinged medieval plainsong in a haunting alluring score. The theme marking Eleanor's arrival is one of our favorite John Barry tracks ever, and this score is highly underrated and in our opinion amongst his best. And a nice price to boot!
MPEG Stream: "Chignon / Eleanor's Arrival"
MPEG Stream: "God Damn You"
MPEG Stream: "How Beautiful You Make Me"
MPEG Stream: "In the Midst of Life We Are Death"

album cover BASTIEN, PIERRE Visions Of Doing (Western Vinyl) cd 14.98
Oooh. We're always excited about any new releases from French automated-instrument builder and trumpeter Pierre Bastien. How often do we get records featuring music made (in part) by robots? Not often enough. And such lovely music too. All these tracks were originally composed as soundtracks to projects by a Dutch experimental filmmaker by the name of Karel Doing (hence the title). But Bastien's music so readily stokes the imagination than Doing's cinematic visions are not necessary accompaniment.
We said 'automated-instrument builder', those instruments being what Bastien calls his 'Meccano', simple sound-making robots or kinetic sound sculptures, that make looping music box melodies and provide a backing of slow, steady mechanical clank for Bastien's own wheezing, muted trumpet. Bastien plays in a smokey jazz mode, breathy, beautiful, oh so melancholic, that in the this context reminds us of Chet Baker in some sort of Tom Waits-ish instrumental junkyard. The gamelan or thumb piano like plinkings of Bastien's Meccano - exotica for scrappy homebuilt robots - are rendered somehow more human by the sweet sighs of Bastien's trumpet. He also makes use of field recordings, unidentified underwater warblings, and other mysterious textures in constructing these tracks. Wonderful stuff, so languid and relaxed and full of life, animated indeed by Bastien's Visions Of Doing. Bastien's previous discs for Rephlex, and others, have all been 'late night faves' here at AQ, and this latest gentle gem from Bastien joins them for sure.
MPEG Stream: "The American On The Highway"
MPEG Stream: "Visions Of Shanghai"
MPEG Stream: "The Thermodynamic Orchestra"

album cover BATES, TYLER The Devil's Rejects - Original Motion Picture Score (La-La Land / Lion's Gate) cd 16.98
Some of you may be tired of us going on and on about that Devil's Rejects movie (we listed the Banjo And Sullivan and the killer soundtrack recently). Well tough luck! We finally got the score in and it's amazing, even if you didn't see the movie. A dark and droney, rumbling creep fest, that if you weren't paying attention you might just mistake for a Lustmord record! We kid you not. Don't know too much about Tyler Bates, other than he has a deft hand at composing a scary score, albeit a hand dripping with viscera and blood! Slow building stretches of rumbling shimmering drones, creaking and crackling, splintering into shards of high end, slow heart beat like pulses, all ominous and oozing with dread, occasionally interrupted by blasts of pulsing teutonic crunch, chaotic rhythms stumbling wildly over tangles of atonal melody and swirls of keening noise. There are moments of obvious soundtrack-ness, where the music was required to dictate some on screen action, a snippet of bump and grind funk, a brief passage of dizzy goofy circus music, but for the most part, each track is a dense black hole of musical misery and dark drones, that should totally hit the spot for all you dark ambient doom drone creatures of the night.
MPEG Stream: "Tiny And His Girl / Police"
MPEG Stream: "Official Clown Business"
MPEG Stream: "Staples"

BATTIATO, FRANCO ZA (Artis) cd 16.98
Minimalist avant piano and voice from 1970s Italy. This composer, we've been told, is much beloved by the Chicago Tortoise crowd. We will also soon be restocking his Jukebox which is a lovely, soaring soundtrack to an older Italian TV movie.

album cover BATTLESTAR GALACTICA 25th Anniversary Edition Original Soundtrack (Geffen) cd 14.98
25 years? Oh my god. Well, if you're at least that old you'll remember the movie/TV show Battlestar Galactica, a Mormons-in-space allegory that gave the world those Cylon baddies and inspired George Lucas' even more successful Star Wars cycle of films. Oh, ok, maybe it was the other way around. Ahem. Anyway, here (at last) is a remastered cd reissue of the soundtrack, which proves to be a pretty fine faux-classical bit of work composed by Stu Phillips and performed by the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra. Play it for your hoity-toity symphony goin' friends and tell 'em it's a rare 20th century classical thing from Russia or a new Jonathan Bepler Cremaster score or something... then see what they think when the bonus track, the *Disco Version* of the main theme, comes on at the end! Lotsa fun. And the cover art bears mentioning: it's hard to believe this was the actual movie poster, but it was -- it looks so much like you'd imagine the Mad magazine parody to look like. I mean, that's a caricature of Lorne Greene, not a proper portrait, right?
MPEG Stream: "The Cylon Trap"
MPEG Stream: "Theme From Battlestar Galactica (Disco Version)"

BAXTER, LES Hell's Belles OST (La-La Land) cd 8.98

BAXTER, LES The Lost Episode (Dionysus) cd 13.98
Previously unreleased. From an old tv show.

BAXTER, LES The Lost Episode (Dionysus) 10" 10.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
Previously unreleased. From an old tv show.

album cover BEAUSOLEIL, BOBBY Lucifer Rising Original Soundtrack (White Dog Music) cd-r 12.98
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
Yes, it's a cd-r, but we're stoked to have it -- it's the only way to get a hold of this, the rare soundtrack to cult underground director and Crowley-ite Kenneth Anger's film Lucifer Rising (begun in the mid-'60s, completed in 1980). Originally Jimmy Page was supposed to do the score, but he bowed out and the music was instead handled by another cult figure, the musical visionary and imprisoned killer Bobby Beausoliel, who composed and performed this spacey psychedelic opus with his Freedom Orchestra (presumably all fellow prisoners with Bobby).
Bobby and the Freedom Orchestra play electric guitars, Fender Rhodes electric pianos, some synths and bass...there's two drummers, and a trumpet player. The result is a sometimes sinister, sometimes blissful, always beautiful and "cosmic" drifting soundscape. Gurgling old-school electronics blend with propulsive rock drumming, while psychedelic guitar soloing tears across the sunset horizon created by the synths...The combination results in what you might imagine an early '70s Tangerine Dream/Ennio Morricone collaboration might have sounded like. It's indeed a lost classic. And the composer's life story is at least as weird and interesting as the music...
In the late Sixties, Bobby was a rising star in the LA rock-pop scene, hanging with Zappa, the Beach Boys, and Love. But then a drug deal went bad and he was sent to death row for murder, arrested 3 days before the Manson killing spree. Fortunately for him, his sentence was eventually commuted, but he's spent like the last 30 years in jail. He's been a model prisoner, pursuing his talents in music and art despite his incarceration, and you'd think that the parole board would have let him out by now (he's been paying his debt to society longer than anybody else has for a similar crime, we're told) but sadly for Bobby, he's got to deal with his association with the notorious Charles Manson. While never a member of Manson's Family (a common misconception), he did play in a band with Manson, and the media hype surrounding anything to do with Manson hasn't helped Bobby's case, as you might imagine! (At least that's the way Beausoleil tells it. But the more one delves into the story of "Lucifer Rising", the weirder things get -- for instance, apparently Bobby was supposed to PLAY the role of Lucifer in the original 1966 version of Anger's film, but the two had a falling out and Bobby allegedly stole the footage and buried it in Death Valley! How this jibes with him later writing this soundtrack, we don't know.)
Yet, not being one to simply sit in his cell and rot, Bobby has, as we said, kept quite busy within the clutches of the California Penal system.
And now, with his wife Barbara dealing with business on the "outside", he's started the White Dog label to release his music. So far they've put out this soundtrack and also a couple of Bobby's newer compositions, stuff more in the New Age vein. They haven't yet made the jump to "real" cds, but their cd-rs are professionally duplicated and printed, with computer art by Bobby himself.
Although for obvious reasons Bobby wouldn't probably approve of the use of the word to describe himself and this soundtrack, in the Aquarius Records' musical context it's quite appropriate: Cult!
RealAudio clip: "track 1"
RealAudio clip: "track 5"

album cover BEAUSOLEIL, BOBBY Lucifer Rising Sessions (Qbico) picture disc 25.00
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
We were able to get Bobby Beausoleil's legendary Lucifer Rising soundtrack on cd for a brief time, but it seems to be unavailable again, so for now, this super limited picture disc may be your only chance to hear this awesomely freaked out music. Side A was recorded live in San Francisco in 1967, and features a killer live version of "The Magick Powerhouse of Oz". The B side is a different version recorded a decade later, in Tracy State Prison where Bobby and and least one other Manson family member was doing time. Here's a truncated version of our review for the now out of print cd version to give you more background on Beausoleil and the Lucifer Rising soundtrack:
The rare soundtrack to cult underground director and Crowley-ite Kenneth Anger's film Lucifer Rising (begun in the mid-'60s, completed in 1980). Originally Jimmy Page was supposed to do the score, but he bowed out and the music was instead handled by another cult figure, the musical visionary and imprisoned killer Bobby Beausoliel, who composed and performed this spacey psychedelic opus with his Freedom Orchestra (presumably all fellow prisoners with Bobby).
Bobby and the Freedom Orchestra play electric guitars, Fender Rhodes electric pianos, some synths and bass...there's two drummers, and a trumpet player. The result is a sometimes sinister, sometimes blissful, always beautiful and "cosmic" drifting soundscape. Gurgling old-school electronics blend with propulsive rock drumming, while psychedelic guitar soloing tears across the sunset horizon created by the synths...The combination results in what you might imagine an early '70s Tangerine Dream/Ennio Morricone collaboration might have sounded like. It's indeed a lost classic. And the composer's life story is at least as weird and interesting as the music...
In the late Sixties, Bobby was a rising star in the LA rock-pop scene, hanging with Zappa, the Beach Boys, and Love. But then a drug deal went bad and he was sent to death row for murder, arrested 3 days before the Manson killing spree. Fortunately for him, his sentence was eventually commuted, but he's spent like the last 30 years in jail. He's been a model prisoner, pursuing his talents in music and art despite his incarceration, and you'd think that the parole board would have let him out by now (he's been paying his debt to society longer than anybody else has for a similar crime, we're told) but sadly for Bobby, he's got to deal with his association with the notorious Charles Manson. While never a member of Manson's Family (a common misconception), he did play in a band with Manson, and the media hype surrounding anything to do with Manson hasn't helped Bobby's case, as you might imagine! (At least that's the way Beausoleil tells it. But the more one delves into the story of "Lucifer Rising", the weirder things get -- for instance, apparently Bobby was supposed to PLAY the role of Lucifer in the original 1966 version of Anger's film, but the two had a falling out and Bobby allegedly stole the footage and buried it in Death Valley! How this jibes with him later writing this soundtrack, we don't know.)
Although for obvious reasons Bobby wouldn't probably approve of the use of the word to describe himself and this soundtrack, in the Aquarius Records' musical context it's quite appropriate: Cult!

album cover BECKER, JIM & COLLEEN BURKE Interkosmos: A Film By Jim Finn (Shrug) lp 14.00
THIS IS CURRENTLY OUT OF PRINT OR OTHERWISE UNAVAILABLE TO US AT THE MOMENT, SO PLEASE DO NOT ORDER IT. SORRY.
**SALE **SALE* *SALE**
Awesome soundtrack to some strange low budget film about the failed East German space program. Haven't seen the movie yet, but the soundtrack definitely has us curious. Especially considering the players, Jim Becker of Califone, Jim White from the Dirty Three, and lots of other folks who have backed up indie luminaries like Smog, Bright Eyes and more...
Beginning with some creepy shortwave radio, and some spoken German (Conet Project anyone?) the record quickly switches gear and launches into some awesome (Turkish style?) fuzz psych, blown out and wildly rocking, but with the strange addition of mandolin over the top. Ends up sounding like Calexico meets Erkin Koray!!
But like any soundtrack, the music is dictated by the scenes on the screen, so the sound are all over the place. That said, they gel surprisingly well on their own, it helps that many of the tracks are linked by strange radio broadcasts, mysterious German voices, and other distressed broadcast sounds. The rest of the music is a blast, from soft rock big band jams with horns, albeit imbued with a strange buzzy steel string element, to lonesome strings and wheezing accordion, shuffling percussion, a full on free-jazz drum solo that gives way to a primitive Logan's Run space rock synth drone, laid back blues rock, weird off kilter pop, and near the end, that opening blast of fuzzy psych gets revisited, this time with vocals, and it's even cooler.
Pressed on 180 gram swirled pink cotton candy vinyl, housed in an amazing jacket, an oversized matchbook style sleeve, screen printed and letter pressed, black and metallic silver ink on thick brown paper, liner notes printed on the attached inner sleeve, quite striking.
LIMITED TO 500 COPIES!!!

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